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Thread: Trane chiller

  1. #1

    Trane chiller

    I just looked at a Trane chiller and feel too lost to know where to begin.
    TRANE: Model:CGABC306AE10BFK13, Serial: J85E81414
    I have the basic ideas for chillers but am unfamilar with sequence of operations and perameters for settings. I have photos. Where to start?
    To start unit the FREEZE STAT needs reset.
    Unit runs for 1 to 2 minutes with only 1 of 3 Condenser fan motors running then trips off (i'm guessing from high head because the condenser coil is supper hot {140*f} )
    While reading wiring diagram the system started on its own and ran for about 10 minutes with the cooling contactor chattering loud and the control board relay chattering also. The hot gas bypass solenoid chattered the loadest.

    Can anyone help with manuals or what to start with?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    you better get the service manual's and start reading, i work on new or unkown equipment all the time and need this information, but i have used the same methods for yrs., i break the system down into sections and start with what i know, theroy and basic knowledge usually gets me thru any call, and i basicly use the same systematic procedures on every call

  3. #3
    I've tried online service manual search but have not found anything. Thanks for the encouragement.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Location
    Vancouver BC
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    Just head to the trane comfortsite and download the IOMs www.comfortsite.com once you are logged in go to "tech support" then "Model Lookup by Serial Number" when I punch in your serial # I see KANAB HIGH SCHOOL ADDN. 7/31/1985, that they have an extended warranty on compressors and all of the associated literature for the unit.
    ___________________________________________
    These Are The Good Old Days

  5. #5
    Thanks for the info update. I did call a Trane salemen and received 2 seperate manuals through email. They must have the same information you found. I have some reading to do (12 page and 226 page documents). Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    San Jose, CA
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    Call a contractor

  7. #7
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    Tampa, FL
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    First thing I do on air cooled is all check fuses. Then manually push in fan contactors and make sure all fans run. Check fan amps at the same time. Listen for bad fan bearings. Check suction superheat and cond subcool for loss of charge or failed TXV power head. Rusted power head is common on these. I'm guessing that in '85 these were still recips with all mechanical control. If scrolls with micro control, double check LP cutouts or replace. Check freeze stat in ice water. The control panel on these older models were quite a challenge. Good Luck

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    If it's not too late I'd like to change my vote to call a contractor as well.

    I would also caution that if you have fewer condenser fan motors operating than you should, high head pressure and at some point everything starts chattering that you may have some burnt condenser fans that are partially shorted to ground and causing havoc when power is applied. Trane was (is)big on those condenser fan motors with vented bottoms and terminals at the bottom where they can get wet. Manually pushing in a contactor on one of these may see it blow up in your face.
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  9. #9
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    manually push in fan contactor, u think could blow up in ur face?

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    I do, I have seen it happen several times and warn people about it when I see them taking shortcuts like pushing in contactors. Especially with condenser fans that operate on full line voltage, sit out in the elements and often burn to charcoal when they fail. Compressors often fail with a solid short as well. An arc flash releases a huge amount of energy and can easily injure you or others in the area. If you suspect a short on 120v and up use your megger to find it before you apply power.
    ___________________________________________
    These Are The Good Old Days

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by seascott View Post
    ...megger...
    uh oh! you said a bad word! (to some anyway). now you're gonna get it.
    When I am late for work, I usually make up for it by leaving early.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by seascott View Post
    I do, I have seen it happen several times and warn people about it when I see them taking shortcuts like pushing in contactors. Especially with condenser fans that operate on full line voltage, sit out in the elements and often burn to charcoal when they fail. Compressors often fail with a solid short as well. An arc flash releases a huge amount of energy and can easily injure you or others in the area. If you suspect a short on 120v and up use your megger to find it before you apply power.
    So when u go to an annual or maintenance / instead of manually push in each fan u would go ahead and che k each with a megger huh. Do u and would u check each to ground also. I guess I can see where manually closing contacts could be a short cut. But yea, a short is a short. Boom

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