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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    564
    Amen to 'Bama's comments.

    If your are both a competent technician and a degreed engineer and get in over 30 years experience, $100K a year is on the low end.

    There are a lot of 30 year experienced engineers I know that would have no idea how often to change the oil on a vacuum pump -- thus, make only $60k a year - they get to write specifications and push only paper. The 55 YO+ engineers I am acquainted with that know how to hook everything up plus the theory are the $150K/year plus guys that got to design the space station.

  2. #54
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Hockey

    Was your out-sourced engineering job HVAC related?
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  3. #55
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,071
    Jobs that I know are begging to be filled in HVAC engineering:

    Tampa Florida, design engineering for HVAC company (2 or more)
    Aaon, four to six HVAC design engineers
    Trane, 17 positions in design engineering across the U.S.


    I hope it is OK to post this link, but go to http://www.hvacsearch.com and send them your resume. My friend Gary, who has helped me get every engineering job I ever had, has called me more than once recently telling me he is "dying" for HVAC engineers.

    Even more than my last job, I am NOT allowed to admit where I work, so I can't tell you how or why we need 40 degreed engineers, but you can e-mail me and I can tell you, or you can contact Gary at the link above and he can tell you.

    $70-120K annually is NOT out of the question. Many companies pay premium wages to an engineer with field experience.

    A someone implied, BS walks. Send your resume and Gary will tell you why you got canned, or he'll find you a job.

    Carnak, No, it has not snowed here in about 20 years, and then it was less than a measurable amount! Not like the Purina job, where 6 inches at a time was the norm, not the exception, and NEGATIVE digits actually got used on the thermometer!
    Hindsight is NOT a plan!

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,071
    Originally posted by Don Sleeth
    Hey, Mr. Cracker! Good to hear your voice!

    don
    It's great to be here. The place has changed a lot, gotten bigger, and changed formats, but still the same cocky upstarts needing to be upbraided here and there, huh?

    How's things in the Great White North?
    Hindsight is NOT a plan!

  5. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579

    So Bama, I believe I am now working for a company you once worked for. I think you even called me on the phone once. All is going very well for me and I hope the same is true for you.

    Yes, there is a demand for good mechanical engineers who also know HVAC. Former technicians with experience actually troubleshooting and repairing equipment who then go on to obtain an ME degree have the most value.

    Norm

  6. #58
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,071
    Yeah Norm, I saw your boss at ASHRAE, and asked about you. He said you were not there, although every other swinging _ick from your company was there. I told him to tell you I said "Hey!"

    I loved working there, I just hated living there. Some of those former co-workers are still my best friends. In fact, if you would go around to the engineering area and find the bald headed guy named "Don" and give him a big hug from me, I'd appreciate it more than you know.

    If you like What-A-Burger, they still go on Fridays, from what I hear. Wish I could be there with them.
    Hindsight is NOT a plan!

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579
    Originally posted by BamaCracker
    Yeah Norm, I saw your boss at ASHRAE, and asked about you. He said you were not there, although every other swinging _ick from your company was there. I told him to tell you I said "Hey!"

    I loved working there, I just hated living there. Some of those former co-workers are still my best friends. In fact, if you would go around to the engineering area and find the bald headed guy named "Don" and give him a big hug from me, I'd appreciate it more than you know.

    If you like What-A-Burger, they still go on Fridays, from what I hear. Wish I could be there with them.

    As much as I respect Don and the others I am not about to give hugs to any of them. Jack is a great guy to work for by the way. We have a great team here! Lots of cooperation.

    Not aware of What A Burger. Where is that? I'll give it a try.

  8. #60
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    North of Boston, MA
    Posts
    270

    Bama

    Thanks for the info. I got downsized from defense work, medical devices, and semiconductors (all manufacturing, all outsourced). I left 2 jobs due to integrity issues.
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"--Wayne Gretzky

  9. #61
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    119

    Smile got a question?

    My boss is a electrical engineer.He runs the company his
    dad started.He graduated top of his class so asked him
    why didnt he pursue being an engineer full time?He gave
    me a couple of simple answers he could be boss at the
    shop stay in his home town but most of all he said that
    he took trip to India been about 12 years ago and
    was realy shocked with the unreal amount of ready to work
    labor plus a social system that lets them work people all
    hours for no money.He says that 10 -15 years from now nearly all engineering will be overseas.What do you think?
    I got a nephew thinking engineer he is 17.Im thinking maybe not so good an idea as it used to be.

  10. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    North of Boston, MA
    Posts
    270

    Maxair Career Decision

    Max,
    I think it depends on the discipline and the area of the country for your nephew. Engineers used to design with slide rules, then calculators. Now "canned" programs do all the design work. ALL manufacturers are going overseas for design (India) and cheap labor (S.E. Asia). Even military components are being made in Mexico, China (yes, Communist China), and elsewhere. Software is dead. Manufacturing is going elsewhere. Civil Engineering is slow.
    By the way, I heard the same great advice about teaching (Math & science) as I did about engineering. I have BOTH credentials. Today's REAL technical need is in medical (nursing, etc.). I see that first-hand.
    If you guys have read this far, New England is a little slow right now for HVAC engineers.
    Where is your nephew, Max?
    hockey
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"--Wayne Gretzky

  11. #63
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    I can see your sore spot hockey, but the bad taste in your mouth against engineering is not really hvac or construction based and you are only talking from an EIT point of view and not as a disgruntled PE.

    So as long as there is construction there is a need.

    If it is slow for HVAC engineers in NE right now then construction must be slowing down.
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  12. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    North of Boston, MA
    Posts
    270

    Engineering

    You are correct, Carnak. In fact, there's alot of vacant commercial property right now (in Boston). As far as jobs go, my philosophy has always been, "Apply where they are hiring." I will always have my BSME, my technician credentials and my teaching certification. That should be enough, huh? How about someone who is 17? What would be prudent advice for him? I certainly wouldn't recommend NASA, computer science, or retail. But I would recommend learning a trade while pursuing something else. It still depends on your location. Manufacturing is better in the south than the north. Here, medical and banking seem to be "in".
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"--Wayne Gretzky

  13. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    With your BSME and your tech experience you already know that you are a natural to work for an HVAC OEM.

    "Apply where they are hiring" will keep you fed and if you like the work all the better.

    I think you are successful if you can earn a living doing something you like doing.

    A 17 year old kid, hmmmm would do him a world of good to go out in the world and work for a living to see what it is like. Nothing wrong whatsoever with trades, I started in sheet metal.

    I think a young kid out in the work force for a while would make a better college student than one straight from high school.

    There is a thriving financial industry here, and what seems to be in demand is IT Guys.

    But as long as there is construction there will be a demand for engineers.
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

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