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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    North of Boston, MA
    Posts
    270

    Originator

    Looks like we lost the originator, daver back on page one. Daver, change to EE (they are more valuable (they get more money and better job security). I hope you are going to a good school. My school started with over 300 freshman but I graduated with only 90. Even though I was in the bottom third at graduation I was in the top 1/10 as a frosh!

    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"--Wayne Gretzky

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    150
    Thought I would add my 2 cents. I'm an ME by education - got involved with HVAC controls right out of school (10 yrs now). My experience is (as far as controls go) - better to be an ME than EE. Better still - someone with trade experience in HVAC, too. Perfect world = HVAC tech w/ engineering degree. Easier to train HVAC guy (understands equipment) than electrician (knows code and how to wire). Almost any engineering degree will give you the basics (heat transfer, control theory, electrical, etc).

    BTW - Many controls companies (Siemens, JCI, etc) want BSME grads for technician jobs (startup, commissioning, etc) - installation work subbed to electrical contractor. My advice to thread starter - if you like knowing how/why things work - ME is a good choice. Get your degree and get a job with a controls contractor - you will learn HVAC systems, soup-to-nuts, and job security is high for good controls guys. Trades can be tempting, especially union work, but you may not want to be in the field anymore when you are 50+. Your degree allows for upward mobility once you pay your dues. JMHO.

  3. #42
    Even if you get a ME degree and have to take a job as a tech for awhile, you will have a bright fucture, just keep your eyes open for oppourtunity, it is out there.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Memphis TN USA
    Posts
    6,945
    I have my ME. It seems like everything we studied in school, there is a canned program to do that job. There still has to be somebody to double check the computer output.

    I started in the mechanical trades and could not wait to get out of school to put all that dirty work behind me. I found out that I did not like being a desk jockey either. AutoCAD was ruining my eyes. I got back into HVAC because I was doing closer to what I thought engineers do.

    One thing about it. Nobody can ever take your education away from you. If you like fixing things or even breaking things, take an engineering class. You might just be about to find a more fun way to break stuff.


    As far as jobs go, I am one of the most employable persons on this board. If one part of the industry heads south, I will be OK. If I mangle my body so I can't get on a roof anymore, I will be OK. I can just step right into a different job. I am looking at several different sides of this field to get into next.
    If the superheat ain't right it ain't charged right.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    North of Boston, MA
    Posts
    270

    Over-Employable

    Kim,
    Good luck with your job search. I am a BSME, a HVAC Service Tech with Universal and Oil Heat License, AutoCAD ability, manufacturing background, proficient with several computer languages, etc... Its not that easy to get a job.
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"--Wayne Gretzky

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,071

    Re: Mechanical Engineer

    Originally posted by hockey
    I am a former cubicle-dwelling engineer who got frustrated because I prefer hands-on field work. The current facts are that there is a GREATER need for talented technicians than there are for engineers. Don't believe your college counselors and their statistics. Engineers are considererd "Overhead" (like a tool) by accountants and there is alot of incentive to outsource these jobs (India, Asia, others). A technician who can troubleshoot is more valuable (and has better job security) than ANY engineer.
    My experience allows me to offer this advice: If you've completed some college classes, go to a tech school (you can get the basics in HVAC in a 6 month program; no need to go more than that), and become a tech. Continue your education by signing up for one-two day seminars.
    To this, I cry BULL****!

    Having been a service technician for 15 years, and now being an engnieer with almost 4 years experience, and desperately needing to hire 40 degreed engineers right now, I can tell you there is a MUCH greater need for degreed engineers than for competent service techs, and you make TONS more money being an engineer.
    Hindsight is NOT a plan!

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Ottawa, Ont. Canada
    Posts
    1,729
    Originally posted by BamaCracker

    To this, I cry BULL****!

    Having been a service technician for 15 years, and now being an engnieer with almost 4 years experience, and desperately needing to hire 40 degreed engineers right now, I can tell you there is a MUCH greater need for degreed engineers than for competent service techs, and you make TONS more money being an engineer.
    Hey, Mr. Cracker! Good to hear your voice!

    don
    don sleeth - HVAC-Talk Founder
    HVAC Computer Systems
    Heat Load Calculation Software

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    Well this is a good day indeed..A blast from the past.
    Welcome back Bama.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    1,642
    Welcome back Bama....

    Since when did Purina require its dog food testers to have a degree...

    Good to see you back..
    I remember many of your posts from way back when... You have been gone way to long.. We need your help to clean up these newbies attitudes..

    Great to see you post
    J

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    150
    Bama - I know FLA is booming but how is it that you could have a need for 40 engineers all of a sudden? Is this a MEP engineering firm or strictly HVAC design? I have plenty of friends up here in Boston who would love a job (any job) in the HVAC engineering field?

    BTW - I can't dispute the $ disparity between engineer and tech, although a tech with years seniority can make more than your average engineer - it all depends where you are located and supply/demand. Hours are better for engineers - fact!

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Does it snow there Cracker?
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  12. #51

    Re: HVAC Work

    Originally posted by hockey
    Yes, That's correct. Like I said, manufacturing. A degree opens the door to many fields. I don't see alot of HVAC engineering jobs on Monster.com or elsewhere. In fact, I am rubbing elbows with unemployed/laid off HVAC engineers.
    Then let us hire them. There are headhunter companies that center around finding and placing MEP engineers. If they were unemployable/laid off, then they must have sucked at engineering. There have been a few that I know that should be kicked out of the profession for sloppy work, little follow up and/or no communication.

    Stick with the ME degree. If you do EE you will get better pay but you won't be in the HVAC industry. Those higher paying EE jobs are with companies doing circuit boards and manufacturing, not MEP engineering.

    As a Penn State AE with a degree specialized for the industry, I would have to say get your degree, your EIT, then do your 4 years and take the PE exam. That will be the last test you will ever have to take in your life, and it will make you permanently employable.

    Avoid the talk about no jobs on 'Monster' or 'Hotjobs' or whatever. MEP design is a niche industry. You are not bound to find the job you want by sifting through the want ads or browsing the internet. What you will start to learn is who the major players are in the USA and beyond, and know the major architecture firms as well. If you stay in one area you will likely hear about and see the same people year to year. When you know this you will learn which companies you want to submit your resume to and which you want to pass on. If you don't know anything about them, an interview will likely tell you want you want to know.

    As a side note, I have learned a lot from this site. I deal primarily with the commercial & government design industry, and reading feedback on everything from commissioning to controls has been helpful. Also it helps with the occasional question from an architect on residential, and the people here are a resource to be respected.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    North of Boston, MA
    Posts
    270

    Employability

    Talk is cheap. Contact us and "we'll" send you a resume.
    hockey
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"--Wayne Gretzky

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