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  1. #79
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,376
    Originally posted by sigma
    Originally posted by snipe70e
    [ So with out a city licience I use the tital Stationary Engineer.
    Len


    Former boiler operators from the Navy should not have to need a license. [/B]
    Hmmm. I disagree.

    For one, if you know your stuff, what's the big deal in obtaining the license?

    When I retired from the Navy, actually about a year before that, I simply got copies of all my relevant service jacket pages to show my time and training and experience. Got a senior officer to sign and certify copies as being true ones. Picked up a study guide and looked thru it. Didn't need to learn about boilers and such. No simple study guide or text was gonna teach me anything I didn't already know about the machinery. I did need however to learn what various civilian terms and definitions for things were. What the civilian rules and laws said.

    Then I took the test. Piece of cake. The technical equipment questions were a breeze for me. BUT I needed to know the civilian rules, laws, etc.

    I don't know how it works elsewhere, but in Minnesota they wanted some sort of proof that your claim that you knew such and such was true. Thus the requirement for proving experience and training, and the test.

    Also, copies of the license are required to be posted on site, if you're the in-house operator or person responsible. So that AHJs, insurance inspectors, fire marshall's, etc when making inspection can see if in fact there is someone qualified taking care of that boiler. Also, so they know who to hammer if there is a problem.

    <Shrug> If a fellow knows what he's doing and talking about, I don't see why a test and licensing requirement is such a big deal.

  2. #80
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    956
    Where I am they have on site electricians, contracted plumbers and hvac companies that do most of the work unfortunately. Motor needs changing, call sparky, RTU down call...

    This building is mainly Pm's on the equipment(filters and belts), testing fire safety equipment as per code, and making sure everyone is comfortable in the building.

    Other buildings we are responsible for changing out the pumps, motors and .....

    I am classified as a building operator, keep things running day to day.

    I think what the title encompasses is different for each building and what company you work for.

    I dont have alot of experience as a building operator but I am constantly learning here and picking the brains of the contractors that are in, mainly because my supervisor can't answer my questions, but keeps telling me "I'm an engineer"


  3. #81
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Buffalo N.Y.
    Posts
    1,571
    Originally posted by snipe70e
    Originally posted by bobby7388
    [.
    But a stationary engineer will always be licensed in some form from a AHJ, if someone doesn't have the license then they should'nt use the name or title
    Bobby,
    Not all S/E hava a licience. California does not require one, I wish they did but they don't.
    At one time I had a Coast Guard's Thirds Licience and that test would make any cities test a walk in the park. So with out a city licience I use the tital Stationary Engineer.
    Len

    PS I agree there are a lot of people using the title that do not have a clue. I work for one.
    [/B]

    Alot of states don't have specific licensing requirements to cover their municipalities, only on state jobs does the state use discretion.
    Cities that don't have licensing requirements usually will have a insurance carrier requirement for a license. Most bigger and older cities will require a license issued by a municipality.

    Are you saying that in your area a license isn't required on hi-pressure boilers?

  4. #82
    Originally posted by coolh2o
    Originally posted by Diceman
    The difference is good service techs can go into any bldg and work on it based on past years of experience.
    Typically PO's, even very good ones, are usually lost once they leave their own bldg.
    Come on Dice.... I have read enough intelligent things you have written for me to think you actually believe this.
    I was mainly responding to the guy who called the outside contractors, chumps....some are, but if they didn't need them, they wouldn't have to call them in.
    Hey cockroach, don't bug me!

    www.AskTheDiceman.com

    www.TheColdConspiracy.com

    www.Pennwood-HVAC.Com

    Bring Em Home....

  5. #83
    Originally posted by Diceman
    Originally posted by coolh2o
    Originally posted by Diceman
    The difference is good service techs can go into any bldg and work on it based on past years of experience.
    Typically PO's, even very good ones, are usually lost once they leave their own bldg.
    Come on Dice.... I have read enough intelligent things you have written for me to think you actually believe this.
    I was mainly responding to the guy who called the outside contractors, chumps....some are, but if they didn't need them, they wouldn't have to call them in.
    He shouldn't have said that, but don't fool yourself about building operators either. I have operated large facilities in Dallas and I have spent time doing start up and operations training in Taiwan and Hong Kong and I can tell you for sure... If you are a real operator it doesn't matter what equipment, what plant, what time zone or hemisphere, cold water, steam, ice or R-22 liquid overfeed... equipment is equipment. Likewise if you are a real service tech... well DITTO!

  6. #84
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    2,089
    Bobby,
    The city of San Jose as far as I know was the last city to require a licience. And when Eldridge (fire inspector) died in the 70's the city's ttesting program died. So no California does not require a licience.
    State law states "a compedent operator shall be on duty at all times", but there is no definition of what a compedent operator is.
    Len
    Old snipes don't die they just loose their steam

  7. #85
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    2,089
    Bobby,
    The city of San Jose as far as I know was the last city to require a licience. And when Eldridge (fire inspector) died in the 70's the city's ttesting program died. So no California does not require a licience.
    State law states "a compedent operator shall be on duty at all times", but there is no definition of what a compedent operator is.
    Len
    Old snipes don't die they just loose their steam

  8. #86
    Wow, I never knew you PO's were so touchy.......
    Hey cockroach, don't bug me!

    www.AskTheDiceman.com

    www.TheColdConspiracy.com

    www.Pennwood-HVAC.Com

    Bring Em Home....

  9. #87
    Originally posted by Diceman
    Wow, I never knew you PO's were so touchy.......
    Not much different than a service tech.... Pride runs deep.

  10. #88
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    London, ON
    Posts
    497
    This has been an interesting thread. I've worked on both sides of "the fence" as well. Perhaps you can be a little more "rounded" when you have done both, but whatever you do, there is always more to learn.

  11. #89
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    2,089
    Originally posted by deanmech
    This has been an interesting thread. I've worked on both sides of "the fence" as well. Perhaps you can be a little more "rounded" when you have done both, but whatever you do, there is always more to learn.
    There are only a few conditions where you can not learn. When you retire and are no longer in the field. And when you becomew useless.
    Len
    Old snipes don't die they just loose their steam

  12. #90


    Learning is limited by ones desire not by the situation he works in.

  13. #91
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ft Worth Tx ( North Richland Hills)
    Posts
    2,143
    Originally posted by newtradesman


    Learning is limited by ones desire not by the situation he works in.
    You thought you were asking a simple question. 7 pages, 90 posts and 1,560 views later...here we are. Wait till you see what happens when you ask something really controversial....like Dice's 9 milimeter thread.
    How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

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