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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
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    2,089
    Anybody know why the term stationary engineer?
    Len
    Old snipes don't die they just loose their steam

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Buffalo N.Y.
    Posts
    1,571
    Originally posted by snipe70e
    Anybody know why the term stationary engineer?
    Len

    Originally, a locomotive boiler was operated by an Engineer, then when licensure was deemed necessary for non-locomotive boilers due to the the large increase in boiler explosions we became known as stationary engineers.

    Locomotive engine boilers are not to be confused with locomotive type stationary boilers, or known in some areas as porkchop style boilers.


    Hey snipe, notice I said we?, this doesn't include you dice, so there!!!!



  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Buffalo N.Y.
    Posts
    1,571
    Originally posted by coolh2o
    Bobby.... You are right about high pressure applications. A license is required to operate them down south also. Speaking of big boilers up north.... I saw one in downton St. Paul for the central heating loop that was freakin' huge. We only see something like that down here in a power plant.
    District Central Steam Heating was first used in America up here in Lockport, N.Y. Though a long forgotton fact we are proud to be known for something besides snow.


  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,377
    Originally posted by bobby7388
    Originally posted by Diceman
    How about stationary engineer?
    Big word for a maint guy or what.
    Sound important though.

    Oh!!! dice, that cuts deep, yet funny in some ways.

    There is a big difference between the two, and all depending on your industry and or location there is an extreme difference.
    Even though both maintenance and stationary engineers may be part of "Plant Operations" their respective duties may or may not cross lines.
    Up here in these parts a licensed engineer is required at any plant that runs hi pressure boilers, and then a certain class level is required depending on boiler HP. A testing process to advance is required to move up the class levels, A Chiefs test is difficult to say the least, you have to sleep, eat, dream boilers to attain the knowledge to pass.

    Anyone can destroy a lo pressure boiler if they so desire, no license needed.
    Try to tend to a 1500 psi watertube boiler that spans 3 stories and generates well over million pounds at full generating capacity, try to feed coal at the proper rates or set up the auto hopper feeder, sootblow the tubes without eating them up in quick time, I thought so.

    I've seen some questionable guys who should not have been licensed to operate boilers, but on the other hand, I've seen some service techs who should not have been allowed to operate a screwdriver, it goes both ways.
    Knowledge is power, but so is common sense.
    Chuckle, agreed. There are no true, nationwide standardized use of the terms.

    Even within one state, usage varies. And qualifications and job performance expectations vary. I'm in the automation and controls end of the business these days, as a contractor putting in new control systems. So meet a LOT of various guys and gals holding, variously, titles as Plant Operators or Stationary Engineers. Runs the gamut from being a janitor who has the added responsibility of checking water levels and doing a daily blowdown on a small, low pressure boiler. To the guys with own offices who spend most of the day with feet up on a desk. To some very highly qualified sorts, who're as knowledgeable as anyone.

    Generally speaking, a stationary engineer around this part of the country (Minnesota)is gonna have at least a low pressure boiler license and some basic familiarity with other equipment. A few of the tech colleges even have certification courses. Teach low pressure boiler operation and -basic- maintenance and repair. Basic air handlers, how to tell if they're working right. Basic electricity. How to replace fuses and reset breakers. Etc.

    Not the same as a full tech course in one of the specialties. A basic familiarization with most building utilities, however. Then they move up, with experience, to hopefully be a Building Engineer. (Head stationary engineer)

    Plant Engineer tends to be (but not always) reserved for folks getting into operation and maintenance of major equipment facilities. The big boilers, big A/C plants, and so forth. For the most part, usually far more qualified types. And many, while they may not get hands on in repairs any more, used to be top notch techs.

    Chuckle, know what yah mean about 3 story boilers, etc. Kind of a small one, tho, isn't it? <G>

    Osiyo --- ex- MMCS, USN, retired.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
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    1,377
    Originally posted by osiyo

    Chuckle, know what yah mean about 3 story boilers, etc. Kind of a small one, tho, isn't it? <G>

    Osiyo --- ex- MMCS, USN, retired.
    Oh, and BTW, licensed Chief-A (unlimited)Boiler Operator, Refrigerant license - unlimited, licensed electrician. Factory and/or formal tech training in fire alarms, door access systems, hydraulics, AC&R, industrial pneumatics; and Andover, Honeywell, TAC, and Automatrix DDC systems.

    I left several things out, but the list gets long.

    One of these days I'm gonna figure out what I want to be when I grow up. <G>

    I still remember visiting an old friend, also an ex-MM and his showing me his power plant where he works since retiring from the Navy. He got my attention when he mentioned taking a look up at the top, then said we'd better take an elevator as it was some 11 floors up.

    Oh my, that was a wonderful place for an old black shoe to visit. I was near slobbering all over myself.


  6. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400

    engineer?

    A few years ago, my wife noticed the toilet didn't flush properly in a "nice" hotel we had just checked into.
    I called the desk clerk.
    She told me she would send up an engineer right away...
    I was pretty sure all I needed was a maintenance guy with a plunger, but I didn't argue.

    Sure enough, she sent a guy with a plunger, but his nametag said "engineer".

    I wonder if he laughed when they gave him that title to go with his plunger?

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Eastern Washington
    Posts
    2,990
    A good plant operator dosen't look busy because he maintains his equipment, and schedules maintenance before it breaks down. Thats what he's paid for, and he earns his money. Same with a Stationery engineer.
    TB
    Everyone knows something I don't.

    2 Chronicles 7:14
    14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and will heal their land.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    Thats all good. I have met many a proffesional guy who has worked as an onsite dude in larger applications. But.

    They don't make the coin you would expect they should. I might have been or even into my future be inclined to go for that kind of inside job. Because I am certain it has some advantages over working for an outside contractor as a service guru. But they don't make good money.

    Before I went on my own I was trying to decide what to do. I was at the time doing light commercial. Resturaunts and small office buildings. I was going after a job that was for to be an in house guy. I did not have the skills needed but I tried to apply anyway. They were looking for a dude with deep deep knowledge of some 1000 tons of centrifical absorbers, JCI controls, VAV's, Towers, water treatment. The whole ball of wax. And they were serious about the fact that they were looking for someone who was very capable and not a gig where this fellow would be calling for help. All for like $21 bucks an hour. I was making like 80 a year doing nothing over 25 tons. I laughed at them.

    Lots of jobs available for in house guys. And they need to know what there doing thats for sure. But I honestly can't see how these sorts of jobs attract the kind of talent really needed with what they seem to pay. So they always end up getting the kinds of guys who think they know, and tell you they know, but they still don't know.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ft Worth Tx ( North Richland Hills)
    Posts
    2,143
    Originally posted by Dowadudda
    So they always end up getting the kinds of guys who think they know, and tell you they know, but they still don't know. [/B]
    Always?....So what's the proof that we do know? I've been here 3 years and never had to call in Carrier for my chillers or Johnson Controls for my automation system. I overhaul my own pumps (40 h.p. split case)You made 80 grand a year? How many hours overtime did that require?

    Maybe some people don't see the almighty dollar as THE bottom line. Maybe not having to fight rush hour traffic and a 2 hour drive for 50 miles across the metroplex is worth something. Maybe getting health insurance for the whole family for $50 bucks a month total is worth something.
    How about 11 holidays and your birthday off with pay and 12 sick days /year and 3 weeks paid vacation after only 2 years. How about when the company matches 5% to the 401k? Maybe spending some time with the family is worth something. I'm doing okay on my 55 grand and The next time you're in the Dallas/Ft Worth area I'll show you my facility and you can ask my bosses or co-workers...how much I've had to call in contractors.
    How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

  10. #23
    Drone....

    I would like to know more about your operation. I spent 15 years in the Dallas market as a plant operator/chief engineer. Drop me an email if you don't mind.

  11. #24

    Talking

    An engineer with a plunger, yeah, that's what I mean, some carry mops and are knowledgeble in incadescant lighting maintenance as well. As if.
    You hear engineer and ya think of someone that actually has a degree in engineering, knows physics or quantum mechanics, can design buildings or build bridges.
    Like a guy who has a PHD in say English, and wants to be called Doctor.
    Hey I am a CEO, CFO, and all kinds of FO's too.
    Don't take it personal........well........only if it applies I mean.
    Hey cockroach, don't bug me!

    www.AskTheDiceman.com

    www.TheColdConspiracy.com

    www.Pennwood-HVAC.Com

    Bring Em Home....

  12. #25
    Don't take it wrong, some of you guys who post here put me to shame, like Bobby who possibly knows more about boilers than anyone I have ever met.
    I learn a lot from yinz.
    I am referring to the schmuck who thinks because his job title has engineer or some other big sounding term in it, he really is smart and important.
    Hey cockroach, don't bug me!

    www.AskTheDiceman.com

    www.TheColdConspiracy.com

    www.Pennwood-HVAC.Com

    Bring Em Home....

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400
    Originally posted by Diceman
    ...Like a guy who has a PHD in say English, and wants to be called Doctor.
    Gotta love the English language.
    We got 40 words that mean the same thing, and one word that we use for 40 different things.

    No wonder immigrants have a hard time learning English.

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