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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    North Central Ohio
    Posts
    230

    Hmm

    I have an interview with a company that sells and installs building management systems as a field engineer. My current employer is sending me out of state to training on a new line of equipment that we are currently selling on the 2nd week in November. My question is should I inform my current employer about this possibility. I really do not want to burn any bridge, but may have the job offer when I come back. It does not seem to be right to do this as I do not have the other offer at this time. I really don't see the logic of informing of this at this time. I would advise him to send someone else in my spot should this opportunity come my way before I leave for the training. This potential postion in one of a great deal of money and furthering my carreer goals. Nothing personal. Please advise any opinions to help in my quest for the truth.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    110
    How about not saying anything, going to the training. When you return, if you change companies, be a stand up guy and arrange for re-imbursement to your current employer. Talk it over with your prospective employer. Maybe *he* will pick up the tab if you come on board.

    No bridges burnt. If you are a valuable employee (as we assume you are) your employer is going to be dismayed to lose you, but he's gonna be PIST if he has to foot a large training bill for a guy that's gonna leave in 2 weeks.

    Just try to be fair to both, and the right thing for yourself.

    If that doesn't work, then there's probably nothing you could have done.

    Good luck,

    cdp3

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,027
    I have been an employer for 20+ years. I don’t know your boss but if you were one of my techs this is what I hope would happen.

    I would expect to have everything on the table and out in the open. I would give my tech the days off he needs to find his place. If he returns with bad news, then he is welcome to come back if things don’t work out.


    A few things that I have learned in business:

    “Money can’t buy happiness, but it sure can buy a better brand of misery”

    "The grass is greener on the other side of the fence when they fertilize with bull****"

    “Honest men are only as honest as the situation they put themselves in”

    "Only an Idiot can burn a bridge when everyone is honest about their intentions"


    You know your situation better than you can possibly make us understand. Good luck in making the right decision.


    .

  4. #4
    I used to be an employer ... does that count?

    When you lay your cards on the table, you are opening yourself up for the other person to either respond in like manner or to react in anger.

    The last time I was in a simular position to your own, I laid my plans on the table.
    I felt better for the action.

    I felt I was being truthful and up front with the man.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    110
    Originally posted by lusker
    I have been an employer for 20+ years. I don’t know your boss but if you were one of my techs this is what I hope would happen.

    I would expect to have everything on the table and out in the open. I would give my tech the days off he needs to find his place. If he returns with bad news, then he is welcome to come back if things don’t work out.

    >snip rest of quote<

    Lusker,

    You are a man among men. Unfortunately, not all employers are as easy going and thoughtful as you are. My last employer, I could not give him notice without covering my arse. He had been burnt by a previous disgruntled employee who tried to blow the Xmission in a service van intentionally after he had given his notice.

    His policy was (and still is): Leave now. I don't want to run the risk of you damaging the company or it's assets, and I should concentrate on providing work to the techs that will remain here.

    Slimy, eh? But that's typical for this area in the Non Union shops. Can't speak of the Union here-never been involved, but I'm looking....

    I hope the men you've trained will retain some of the "esprit de corps" that you seem to practice.

    Good on ya!

    cdp3

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,027
    You are right about that... I am too easy going. I have had bosses that would make the Wolfman look tame. It is just not my way but I have my moments too.

    Drinking and drugs, you do'em, I find out, your history without a discussion. You get ugly with a customer for no reason but your own or just plain do things that are not honest your tools and junk will be in the road and you along with it no matter where you are.

    I have had my share of fires but most good bosses have as well as bad. Other guys that have been trained by me have their own businesses now and we work together to cover our area. I don't except a notice for the reasons you stated. You say you found another job, go start it today.

    It is just nice to be nice. But... when I am bad, I am really bad!

    Thanks cdp, but I have a wilted halo.





  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    crestview,florida
    Posts
    52
    i wouldnt tell him crap until i was sure about the other job.you may decide you have it better there.or you may say why did i not move sooner.either way the employer is for them not you.we are just shots in a gun when we are fired another waits in line my advice worry about you first.this comes from a24 year tech hvacr.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    delaware
    Posts
    102
    I agree with worrie about yourself first i recently changed companies and i checked the little box that said it was okay to contact my current employer, Well when they did i had a meeting the next day and it was him telling me that after two years and plenty of customers who were happy with my skills, That now i needed to do things different ala i am free to pursue other options before i had the other job......He did send me to school often i can see his point but on the other hand i know i made him alot of money and a few payments on his new pick up truck..But all is well make about $3/hr more and i now live by the beach with no on call. So yes cover your own butt on this matter if you have skills no need to worry....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lady Lake, Florida
    Posts
    799
    I concur. Take care of your family and self first. I can say by the fact of the position I'm currently in. Looking around for better employment also. I learned the hard way that just short of 8 years of loyalty my current employer isn't what he seems. But that's my hard luck.

  10. #10

    cdp3 has the best advice

    I currently employee 5 people at a small company in Virginia,
    And as an employer no matter how much I want to look out for my employees, I must put the best interest of the company first. You as an employee should not be expected to be any different; as much as you would love to be upfront about the situation it may cause you problems to do so.
    Even if you decide not to take the other position your current boss may always be a little leery if he knows you could leave at any time.
    If you follow the advice of cdp3 and offer to reimburse your boss if you take the other position, and give him the notice he requires he will respect you for character and you will always be welcome to come back if the need arises.
    A woman has the last word in any argument
    Anything a man says after that is the beginning of a new argument.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    This is my opinion. And it's probably mine alone. There is such a distorted veiw on this situation. First of all. Training is something I would only allow for trusted long term proven loyal employees. Second to that. An employer owes nothing to an employee other than a desirable, respectfull atmosphere and a payroll check for doing the job. Somewhere in there, though, most employees somehow think that a companies success or failure equates to their performance alone and expects something for the daring dutifull work.

    I look at it this way. I hire you, I will pay you well, I will do my part to give you every reason to do that job succesfully, bearing in mind some reasonable understanding that not every day is a bucket of roses. But in return, you need to come to work and step up and bat every day too. The employee and employer only owe that to one another and nothing more.

    So what if you make a lot of money for the company. After all, if your doing the job your paid to do, it should make money for the company.

    Please don't misunderstand me. I am a seflish guy too. But I did something about it and went and did my own thing. My previous employer owed me nothing for making his company money. That was my job. I got paid to do it.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Beaufort, SC
    Posts
    2,821
    Good Point Dow.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    s.c.
    Posts
    287
    I think thats why many employers will never find employee's willing to put the same effort as a owner will into building a company & making profit. Its my opinion that you have to share. I started my own gig cause I was tired of a owner getting rich off of my back & brains. To a certain extent I agree with dow. Then again when I was employed by someone the following math just doesnt add up to me: work all week turn enough profit to pay exspences, my salary , the owner's salary & in the process secure a future for him & his kids & in return all that is owed to me is a check . I just think more should be shared with emplyee's weather it be profit sharing, a yearly performance bonus, or stock in the co. Of coarse thats just my opinion I could be wrong
    I can do all things...

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