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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Florida Panhandle
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    'When We Came Back They
    Had Destroyed All The Houses'
    By Chris McGreal at Jabaliya refugee camp
    The Guardian - UK
    10-18-4

    The Israeli general who commanded the destruction of the only Jewish settlement in the Sinai before it was returned to Egypt recently offered Ariel Sharon advice on how to carry out his pledge to remove settlers from the Gaza strip.

    "Evicting someone from the home they've lived in for 20 years isn't a simple matter," wrote Brigadier General Obed Tira. "To remove a family from its home is embarrassing and difficult, and that is why the removal needs to be done with a lot of love and a lot of wisdom."

    The soldiers who arrived outside the home of Ghalia Abu Radwan, her octogenarian parents, blind siblings and assortment of children in Khan Yunis in the middle of the night showed no love, and, if they were embarrassed, there was no way to know it because they were hidden behind the armour of their bulldozers and tanks.

    As the loudspeakers on the tanks ordered the families out, and bursts of gunfire sharpened the terror, Mrs Abu Radwan shepherded her blind brother and sister to safety.

    "I grabbed them by the hand and shouted to my mother to follow us," said Mrs Abu Radwan. "Think of it - 25 children, two blind adults and my parents who cannot run. My sister-in-law left her three year-old behind in the chaos and had to go back to get him. When we came back they had destroyed all the houses."

    Mrs Abu Radwan's mother, Ommuhammed, said she thought she would also die.

    "I kept imagining a piece of shrapnel hitting my head. I was so exhausted I had to crawl in the sand sometimes or put my hand on Ghalia's shoulder and let her pull me," she said.

    "Since 1948, the Israelis have demolished three of my homes. This is the most difficult because before others helped us rebuild but now everyone needs help and I don't know who will help us."

    While Mr Sharon agonises over how to draw 7,500 Jewish settlers out of Israel's Gaza colonies - offering hundreds of thousands of dollars in compensation to each family - the army has already bulldozed close to 9,000 Palestinians from their homes in the Gaza strip this year alone.

    Most got no more than a few minutes notice to get out and lost all but the possessions they could hurriedly bundle together.

    The latest target was Jabaliya refugee camp near Gaza city. From dawn on Saturday the people came, trying to find their bearings amid the rubble and then scrambling across the sand where once there was an asphalt road.

    A man ripped at the remains of his shattered home in search of anything that could be saved, burrowing out a picture, some clothes, a schoolbook. Another collapsed on to the wreckage, stunned and silent.

    The tide began as soon as it was clear that Israeli tanks had pulled out of Jabaliya after 17 days of destruction and killing. The bulldozers left behind dozens of flattened homes and hundreds homeless.

    The remains of the mosque were marked by its twisted steel minaret and loudspeakers. A sewage line torn from the ground spewed filth as people attempted to jump it. The only clue to the existence of a small orange grove was a few of the scattered fruits.

    The scale of the destruction - about 20 acres of homes, shops and roads razed or ground into the sand - matched the Israelis' controversial assault on Jenin refugee camp two years ago. But the death toll in Jabaliya was double that with about 130 people killed, one in six of them children 15 or younger.

    Within hours of pulling out of Jabaliya, the army's bulldozers were at work again in another Gaza refugee camp, Rafah.

    "One would have thought that the Israeli withdrawal from the Gaza strip would decrease house demolitions," said Kenneth Ross, director of Human Rights Watch, after visiting Jabaliya.

    "In fact, house demolitions have risen dramatically. This seems to reflect on the one hand a political show of force and Sharon's desire not to be seen to withdraw under fire, but also part of his vision to create a buffer zone along the Egyptian border. It is also part of a wider pattern of punishing civilians."

    A United Nations human rights report on the Israeli occupation to be presented to the general assembly this month accuses Israel of "massive and wanton destruction of property" in the Gaza strip.

    "Bulldozers have destroyed homes in a purposeless manner and have savagely dug up roads, including electricity, sewage and water lines," it says.

    Most of the destruction is focused on Rafah, along Gaza's border with Egypt, and neighbouring Khan Yunis refugee camp.

    But in recent weeks there has also been widespread destruction of homes as the army widened the "security zone" around Netzarim Jewish settlement, and in the Palestinian towns of Beit Hanoun and Beit Lehia.

    The pummelling of Rafah in May left about 4,000 people homeless. Four years ago, buildings in the refugee camp ran right up to the military area on the border, known as the Philadelphi road. Half of Rafah's Block O neighbourhood has since been destroyed.

    Even after Israel pulls its settlers and soldiers out of the Gaza strip, it will remain the occupying power under international law, and it intends to strengthen its grip on the territory's borders. The disengagement plan speaks of "widening the area" along the Philadelphi road.

    "So far about 10% of Rafah is destroyed and if Israeli plans are carried through, approximately a third of Rafah will be destroyed," said Mr Ross.

    With the destruction comes death. In July, a 75 year-old man in a wheelchair, Ibrahim Halfalla, was crushed to death under the rubble of his Khan Yunis home by an army bulldozer because he did not get out in time.

    As Mrs Abu Radwan and her family fled, the army shot dead a 60-year-old neighbour, Ahmad Abu-Nimer, as he fled. Two other men were wounded by gunfire.

    Israel says the demolitions meet the international legal requirement of military necessity because homes are destroyed in the hunt for weapons smuggling tunnels or because they are used by Palestinian combatants to attack Israeli forces.

    The UN and Human Rights Watch say that is merely an excuse. They say it would be more efficient, and safer for Israeli troops, to detect and close off the tunnels behind the protective wall the military has built along the border by using listening devices and ground penetrating radar.

    They add that the number of tunnels found is relatively small in comparison to the number of buildings destroyed.

    The army claims to have uncovered 90, but that number includes several entrances to the same tunnel and the beginnings of wells.

    Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2004

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/israel
    /Story/0,2763,1329830,00.html



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    20,677
    Originally posted by royc
    'When We Came Back They
    Had Destroyed All The Houses'
    By Chris McGreal at Jabaliya refugee camp
    The Guardian - UK
    10-18-4

    The Israeli general who commanded the destruction of the only Jewish settlement in the Sinai before it was returned to Egypt recently offered Ariel Sharon advice on how to carry out his pledge to remove settlers from the Gaza strip.

    "Evicting someone from the home they've lived in for 20 years isn't a simple matter," wrote Brigadier General Obed Tira. "To remove a family from its home is embarrassing and difficult, and that is why the removal needs to be done with a lot of love and a lot of wisdom."

    The soldiers who arrived outside the home of Ghalia Abu Radwan, her octogenarian parents, blind siblings and assortment of children in Khan Yunis in the middle of the night showed no love, and, if they were embarrassed, there was no way to know it because they were hidden behind the armour of their bulldozers and tanks.

    As the loudspeakers on the tanks ordered the families out, and bursts of gunfire sharpened the terror, Mrs Abu Radwan shepherded her blind brother and sister to safety.

    "I grabbed them by the hand and shouted to my mother to follow us," said Mrs Abu Radwan. "Think of it - 25 children, two blind adults and my parents who cannot run. My sister-in-law left her three year-old behind in the chaos and had to go back to get him. When we came back they had destroyed all the houses."

    Mrs Abu Radwan's mother, Ommuhammed, said she thought she would also die.

    "I kept imagining a piece of shrapnel hitting my head. I was so exhausted I had to crawl in the sand sometimes or put my hand on Ghalia's shoulder and let her pull me," she said.

    "Since 1948, the Israelis have demolished three of my homes. This is the most difficult because before others helped us rebuild but now everyone needs help and I don't know who will help us."

    While Mr Sharon agonises over how to draw 7,500 Jewish settlers out of Israel's Gaza colonies - offering hundreds of thousands of dollars in compensation to each family - the army has already bulldozed close to 9,000 Palestinians from their homes in the Gaza strip this year alone.

    Most got no more than a few minutes notice to get out and lost all but the possessions they could hurriedly bundle together.

    The latest target was Jabaliya refugee camp near Gaza city. From dawn on Saturday the people came, trying to find their bearings amid the rubble and then scrambling across the sand where once there was an asphalt road.

    A man ripped at the remains of his shattered home in search of anything that could be saved, burrowing out a picture, some clothes, a schoolbook. Another collapsed on to the wreckage, stunned and silent.

    The tide began as soon as it was clear that Israeli tanks had pulled out of Jabaliya after 17 days of destruction and killing. The bulldozers left behind dozens of flattened homes and hundreds homeless.

    The remains of the mosque were marked by its twisted steel minaret and loudspeakers. A sewage line torn from the ground spewed filth as people attempted to jump it. The only clue to the existence of a small orange grove was a few of the scattered fruits.

    The scale of the destruction - about 20 acres of homes, shops and roads razed or ground into the sand - matched the Israelis' controversial assault on Jenin refugee camp two years ago. But the death toll in Jabaliya was double that with about 130 people killed, one in six of them children 15 or younger.

    Within hours of pulling out of Jabaliya, the army's bulldozers were at work again in another Gaza refugee camp, Rafah.

    "One would have thought that the Israeli withdrawal from the Gaza strip would decrease house demolitions," said Kenneth Ross, director of Human Rights Watch, after visiting Jabaliya.

    "In fact, house demolitions have risen dramatically. This seems to reflect on the one hand a political show of force and Sharon's desire not to be seen to withdraw under fire, but also part of his vision to create a buffer zone along the Egyptian border. It is also part of a wider pattern of punishing civilians."

    A United Nations human rights report on the Israeli occupation to be presented to the general assembly this month accuses Israel of "massive and wanton destruction of property" in the Gaza strip.

    "Bulldozers have destroyed homes in a purposeless manner and have savagely dug up roads, including electricity, sewage and water lines," it says.

    Most of the destruction is focused on Rafah, along Gaza's border with Egypt, and neighbouring Khan Yunis refugee camp.

    But in recent weeks there has also been widespread destruction of homes as the army widened the "security zone" around Netzarim Jewish settlement, and in the Palestinian towns of Beit Hanoun and Beit Lehia.

    The pummelling of Rafah in May left about 4,000 people homeless. Four years ago, buildings in the refugee camp ran right up to the military area on the border, known as the Philadelphi road. Half of Rafah's Block O neighbourhood has since been destroyed.

    Even after Israel pulls its settlers and soldiers out of the Gaza strip, it will remain the occupying power under international law, and it intends to strengthen its grip on the territory's borders. The disengagement plan speaks of "widening the area" along the Philadelphi road.

    "So far about 10% of Rafah is destroyed and if Israeli plans are carried through, approximately a third of Rafah will be destroyed," said Mr Ross.

    With the destruction comes death. In July, a 75 year-old man in a wheelchair, Ibrahim Halfalla, was crushed to death under the rubble of his Khan Yunis home by an army bulldozer because he did not get out in time.

    As Mrs Abu Radwan and her family fled, the army shot dead a 60-year-old neighbour, Ahmad Abu-Nimer, as he fled. Two other men were wounded by gunfire.

    Israel says the demolitions meet the international legal requirement of military necessity because homes are destroyed in the hunt for weapons smuggling tunnels or because they are used by Palestinian combatants to attack Israeli forces.

    The UN and Human Rights Watch say that is merely an excuse. They say it would be more efficient, and safer for Israeli troops, to detect and close off the tunnels behind the protective wall the military has built along the border by using listening devices and ground penetrating radar.

    They add that the number of tunnels found is relatively small in comparison to the number of buildings destroyed.

    The army claims to have uncovered 90, but that number includes several entrances to the same tunnel and the beginnings of wells.

    Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2004

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/israel
    /Story/0,2763,1329830,00.html


    ================================================== ==========

    Now who is Hitleresque? Now who is anti-semitic? Same people as always...the dems/libs.
    No reserve. No retreat. No regrets.

    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

    http://www.airwarvietnam.com/16thSOSGunners2.jpg

    Proud member of KA Club

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Florida Panhandle
    Posts
    4,363
    I dont like wasting my time replying to your rants. Your replies are so predictable. Your one liners have no substance other then to degrade others that you percieve to not hold the same ideology you have, whatever that may be.

    I have told you before, and I'm going to tell you again. I'm not a DEMOCRAT or a REPUPLICAN. And I'm not ANT-JEWISH in any sense, for I left my country of birth because I could not stomach what had happend there.

    We have millions of people in this country with all kinds of different ideologys, opinions and religious persuation, to pidgenhole them may satisfy your narrow mindedness but is not what this country is, or should be about.

    How many islamics are in this country, do you realy think they want the destruction of this country? I can tell you from personal experience they came here because of the guarantees that this constitution of ours provides. Such guarantees can not be found anywhere else on this planet. You and others who were born here take such rights for granted, for you have not experienced desptotic rulers and the conditions that bring such rule in to existance.

    All I can tell you, what I see today is looking more and more familiar, and it scares the hell out of me. Now you may dismiss me, and I know you will, for your replies are predictable. But the fact remains that poltical factions in this country are rocking the boat, and unless all of us work together, this boat will sink.

    Roy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    20,677
    Roy, I commend you on having left whatever horrble place you left to find a better life for yourself and your family.

    But when you see articles like the one posted above, look closely at the wording for embellishments which will reveal the lack of veracity.

    The author talks about a sewage line "spewing" filth. For something to "spew" requires pressure. Since the guy must be a writer, he should know that simple little fact.

    Sewage lines are not under pressure except at lift stations. That pressure is a relatively low pressure and would not "spew". The author is obviously embellishing to make a picture that is inaccurate in truth. Once there sre any inaccuracies, the whole story loses veracity. I have very serious doubts as to anything this author wrote.

    No reserve. No retreat. No regrets.

    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

    http://www.airwarvietnam.com/16thSOSGunners2.jpg

    Proud member of KA Club

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Buffalo N.Y.
    Posts
    1,571
    Originally posted by royc

    How many islamics are in this country, do you realy think they want the destruction of this country? I can tell you from personal experience they came here because of the guarantees that this constitution of ours provides. Such guarantees can not be found anywhere else on this planet. You and others who were born here take such rights for granted, for you have not experienced desptotic rulers and the conditions that bring such rule in to existance.
    Roy

    The problem here is that the freedoms that are given us by the constitution will and can be used against us, what do we do?
    These issues could not or were not foreseen by our founding fathers who crafted the constitution.

    We are, as Americans, suppose to accept any nationalities that want a better life from any country that surpressed them, but what about the ones that want us harm within our society?

    Sometimes you have to be blantently realistic, islamics, muslims, arabs cannot be trusted at this time, in the world we live, including our own. On the surface they all look inocent, but deep inside they hold their own loyalties.




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    110
    Originally posted by bootlen
    Roy, I commend you on having left whatever horrble place you left to find a better life for yourself and your family.

    But when you see articles like the one posted above, look closely at the wording for embellishments which will reveal the lack of veracity.

    The author talks about a sewage line "spewing" filth. For something to "spew" requires pressure. Since the guy must be a writer, he should know that simple little fact.

    Sewage lines are not under pressure except at lift stations. That pressure is a relatively low pressure and would not "spew". The author is obviously embellishing to make a picture that is inaccurate in truth. Once there sre any inaccuracies, the whole story loses veracity. I have very serious doubts as to anything this author wrote.

    Bollocks! Ever heard of a "forced main"? Believe me, they'll spew. Ever seen a main blockage in a high rise? Pull the cleanout plug. Ga 'head. See if it doesn't surpass "spew" as an adjective, or even verb.

    Your narrowminded one line attacks are old. We get it. You're gonna vote for W. That speaks volumes....

    And Pat Tillman is the Right Wing version of Michael Moore. At least Moore hires his own cameramen....

    Don't be a sheep. Rock the vote. It's a pretty sad state of affairs, when the very men we elect to run our country are so wealthy they're out of touch with the common reality.

    And for someone berating literature for the "embellishments" contained within, why are you so loudly spouting for an administration that has so unabashedly put spin on everything from the EPA (Governor of Jersey????), to Enron (Kenny Boy), to recreating the word "nuclear". If you want to cinch on facts, don't be selective. It's time for truth in American politics, and the truth is that a couple of rich, elitist, good ole boys have risen to the top. Sadly, one of them is an intellectual elitist, the other is wealthy by proxy, and probably burnt down his frat house lighting his intestinal vapors.

    The milk of American politics is curdled, and this is the cream that rises to the top.

    Bush,Kerry, whatever, but we need to try somebody else's way. The Bush doctrine of "lie to invade first, justify at all costs later" is not working. The sad part is, regardless of who goes into office, a vast amount of their energy is going to be expended on a massive PR campaign just to get the world to listen to us. Respect? Out of the question for the next generation or so, thanks to the great crusaders Bush, Rumsfeld, and Rove.

    Besides, if he's afraid of a homosexual, he's too much of a chickensh*t for me. Bottom line, if you're gay, a minority, poor, or non-Christian, then Bush is not an option unless you're a masochist.

    My choice? Colin Powell, hands down. He won't take the job. Apparently, he doesn't want to lower his standards to enter the political arena.

    Open your mind. Examine the facts. Think for yourself.

    Don't be a "sheeple".

    Anybody but Bush in '04

    cdp3

    ps...think of the look on everyones face if *Hillary* won on a write in vote....


  7. #7
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    Jun 2001
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    3,910
    <<<< Awaits Implosion

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Pekin, IL USA
    Posts
    700
    Originally posted by bb
    <<<< Awaits Implosion
    You may implode now, no need to wait. Please hurry!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    3,910
    Not Me numbnuts.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Pekin, IL USA
    Posts
    700
    Originally posted by bb
    Not Me numbnuts.
    I know what you meant. And I still await your implosion. Bonehead.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    Great URBAN RENEWAL

    Originally posted by royc
    'When We Came Back They
    Had Destroyed All The Houses'
    By Chris McGreal at Jabaliya refugee camp
    The Guardian - UK
    10-18-4

    The Israeli general who commanded the destruction of the only Jewish settlement in the Sinai before it was returned to Egypt recently offered Ariel Sharon advice on how to carry out his pledge to remove settlers from the Gaza strip.

    "Evicting someone from the home they've lived in for 20 years isn't a simple matter," wrote Brigadier General Obed Tira. "To remove a family from its home is embarrassing and difficult, and that is why the removal needs to be done with a lot of love and a lot of wisdom."

    The soldiers who arrived outside the home of Ghalia Abu Radwan, her octogenarian parents, blind siblings and assortment of children in Khan Yunis in the middle of the night showed no love, and, if they were embarrassed, there was no way to know it because they were hidden behind the armour of their bulldozers and tanks.

    As the loudspeakers on the tanks ordered the families out, and bursts of gunfire sharpened the terror, Mrs Abu Radwan shepherded her blind brother and sister to safety.

    "I grabbed them by the hand and shouted to my mother to follow us," said Mrs Abu Radwan. "Think of it - 25 children, two blind adults and my parents who cannot run. My sister-in-law left her three year-old behind in the chaos and had to go back to get him. When we came back they had destroyed all the houses."

    Mrs Abu Radwan's mother, Ommuhammed, said she thought she would also die.

    "I kept imagining a piece of shrapnel hitting my head. I was so exhausted I had to crawl in the sand sometimes or put my hand on Ghalia's shoulder and let her pull me," she said.

    "Since 1948, the Israelis have demolished three of my homes. This is the most difficult because before others helped us rebuild but now everyone needs help and I don't know who will help us."

    While Mr Sharon agonises over how to draw 7,500 Jewish settlers out of Israel's Gaza colonies - offering hundreds of thousands of dollars in compensation to each family - the army has already bulldozed close to 9,000 Palestinians from their homes in the Gaza strip this year alone.

    Most got no more than a few minutes notice to get out and lost all but the possessions they could hurriedly bundle together.

    The latest target was Jabaliya refugee camp near Gaza city. From dawn on Saturday the people came, trying to find their bearings amid the rubble and then scrambling across the sand where once there was an asphalt road.

    A man ripped at the remains of his shattered home in search of anything that could be saved, burrowing out a picture, some clothes, a schoolbook. Another collapsed on to the wreckage, stunned and silent.

    The tide began as soon as it was clear that Israeli tanks had pulled out of Jabaliya after 17 days of destruction and killing. The bulldozers left behind dozens of flattened homes and hundreds homeless.

    The remains of the mosque were marked by its twisted steel minaret and loudspeakers. A sewage line torn from the ground spewed filth as people attempted to jump it. The only clue to the existence of a small orange grove was a few of the scattered fruits.

    The scale of the destruction - about 20 acres of homes, shops and roads razed or ground into the sand - matched the Israelis' controversial assault on Jenin refugee camp two years ago. But the death toll in Jabaliya was double that with about 130 people killed, one in six of them children 15 or younger.

    Within hours of pulling out of Jabaliya, the army's bulldozers were at work again in another Gaza refugee camp, Rafah.

    "One would have thought that the Israeli withdrawal from the Gaza strip would decrease house demolitions," said Kenneth Ross, director of Human Rights Watch, after visiting Jabaliya.

    "In fact, house demolitions have risen dramatically. This seems to reflect on the one hand a political show of force and Sharon's desire not to be seen to withdraw under fire, but also part of his vision to create a buffer zone along the Egyptian border. It is also part of a wider pattern of punishing civilians."

    A United Nations human rights report on the Israeli occupation to be presented to the general assembly this month accuses Israel of "massive and wanton destruction of property" in the Gaza strip.

    "Bulldozers have destroyed homes in a purposeless manner and have savagely dug up roads, including electricity, sewage and water lines," it says.

    Most of the destruction is focused on Rafah, along Gaza's border with Egypt, and neighbouring Khan Yunis refugee camp.

    But in recent weeks there has also been widespread destruction of homes as the army widened the "security zone" around Netzarim Jewish settlement, and in the Palestinian towns of Beit Hanoun and Beit Lehia.

    The pummelling of Rafah in May left about 4,000 people homeless. Four years ago, buildings in the refugee camp ran right up to the military area on the border, known as the Philadelphi road. Half of Rafah's Block O neighbourhood has since been destroyed.

    Even after Israel pulls its settlers and soldiers out of the Gaza strip, it will remain the occupying power under international law, and it intends to strengthen its grip on the territory's borders. The disengagement plan speaks of "widening the area" along the Philadelphi road.

    "So far about 10% of Rafah is destroyed and if Israeli plans are carried through, approximately a third of Rafah will be destroyed," said Mr Ross.

    With the destruction comes death. In July, a 75 year-old man in a wheelchair, Ibrahim Halfalla, was crushed to death under the rubble of his Khan Yunis home by an army bulldozer because he did not get out in time.

    As Mrs Abu Radwan and her family fled, the army shot dead a 60-year-old neighbour, Ahmad Abu-Nimer, as he fled. Two other men were wounded by gunfire.

    Israel says the demolitions meet the international legal requirement of military necessity because homes are destroyed in the hunt for weapons smuggling tunnels or because they are used by Palestinian combatants to attack Israeli forces.

    The UN and Human Rights Watch say that is merely an excuse. They say it would be more efficient, and safer for Israeli troops, to detect and close off the tunnels behind the protective wall the military has built along the border by using listening devices and ground penetrating radar.

    They add that the number of tunnels found is relatively small in comparison to the number of buildings destroyed.

    The army claims to have uncovered 90, but that number includes several entrances to the same tunnel and the beginnings of wells.

    Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2004

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/israel
    /Story/0,2763,1329830,00.html


    As the one and only superpower, the US could do well in using Israel as a role model in handling terrorism.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    southeast
    Posts
    1,477
    first off ;rob,

    isreal is no god example of how to handle terrorism.

    for all their "effectiveness", shooting kids that are throwing rocks at them,and bull dozing neighborhoods so they don't have to rocket individual apartment houses; they have been under a constant state of attack for a generation now. and the old timers in isreal remember when is was them(the isreali's) who were the terrorists.like the king david hotel massacre in 1946? or 48?.ask the british,palestine was under their discretion,then. they were losing several soldiers to isreali terrorist , a week ,back then.

    now the zionists are also looking to be wanna-be fascists.like the germans and the catholics that kept them in ghettos for hundreds of years, they are building a wall around the palestinians.
    all because they think "god" gave them that land. talk about mass hysteria,mass deception,and religous nuts. they are like bush and hitler, they think god talks to them and uses them. those stories almost always turn out bad.

    the devil seems to morph, who was once righteous,becomes the inquisitor.watch out america.

    the power of pride...
    pride goeth before a fall...
    pride is a sin.......

    ....so who has that sticker on their car?...you got that one ,bootlen?it is right up your alley.


    bootlen , I was going to add to the pile being heaped on your idiocy,but, CDP3 , said it well.(and spewing sh&t is something you and a pipe running down the hill have in common.)


    and bobby,
    it is easy to pick on arabs,there are many that don't like us for who we are. they think you, me and bootlen are the same thing.sounds ignorant on their part ,doesn't it?that is how people in this country sound about those "arabs",being dangerous.

    but after oklahoma city, did you think we should have profiled whitebread ex-servicemen,and said"we gotta watch out for them, our freedoms make us vulnerable."?






  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    20,677
    Man, I thought someone fixed that stink problem but it's back.





    Ppphhhheeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwwwwww!
    No reserve. No retreat. No regrets.

    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

    http://www.airwarvietnam.com/16thSOSGunners2.jpg

    Proud member of KA Club

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