Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 14 to 26 of 32

Thread: Heros

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    3,910
    So would he justify as being a hero ?

    http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor..._re_enlistment

    Paratrooper Who Lost Leg in War Re-Enlists

    FORT BRAGG, N.C. - George Perez lost his leg to a roadside bomb in Iraq (news - web sites) more than a year ago, but despite the phantom pains that haunt him, he says he is determined to prove to the Army that he is no less of a man and no less of a soldier.

    "I'm not ready to get out yet," he says. "I'm not going to let this little injury stop me from what I want to do."

    Perez, 21, still feels the sweat between his toes when he exercises. He's still plagued with nagging cramps in his calf muscle. And sometimes, when he gets out of bed at night without thinking, he topples over.

    He is one of at least four amputees from the 82nd Airborne Division to re-enlist. With a new carbon-fiber prosthetic leg, Perez intends to show a medical board he can run an eight-minute mile, jump out of airplanes and pass all the other paratrooper tests that will allow him to go with his regiment to Afghanistan (news - web sites) next year.

    On Sept. 14, 2003, Perez, of Carteret, N.J., and seven other members of his squad were rumbling down a road outside Fallujah when a bomb blast rocked their Humvee. Perez recalls flying through the air and hitting the ground hard.

    The blast killed one of Perez's comrades. Perez felt surprisingly little pain, but when he tried to get up, he couldn't. He saw that his left foot was folded backward onto his knee. His size 12 1/2 combat boot stood in the dusty road a few feet away, still laced.

    A photograph of Perez's lonely boot transmitted around the world and spread across two pages of Time magazine became a stark reminder that the war in Iraq was far from over.

    Doctors initially tried to save part of Perez's foot. But an infection crept up his leg, and Perez agreed to allow the amputation below the knee joint.

    "I was going to stay in no matter what," he recalls telling the surgeons. "Do whatever would get me back fastest."

    Perez was left with a rounded stump that fits into the suction cup of the black carbon-fiber prosthetic leg.

    When he arrived at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., for his rehabilitation, Perez asked a pair of generals who visited his bedside if it was possible for him to stay in the Army.

    "They told me, 'It's all up to you, how much you want it,'" he says. "If I could do everything like a regular soldier, I could stay in."

    He wasted little time getting started. At one point, a visitor found him doing push-ups in bed. He trained himself to walk normally with his new leg, and then run with it.

    Perez has to rise at least an hour earlier than his fellow soldiers to allow swelling from the previous day's training to subside enough for his stump to fit into the prosthetic.

    But it is a comfort for Perez to know he's not alone.

    At least three other paratroopers in the 82nd have lost limbs in combat during the past two years and re-enlisted. One of them, Staff Sgt. Daniel Metzdorf, lost his right leg above the knee in a Jan. 27 blast. He appealed three times before the fitness board allowed him to stay on.

    "I think it's a testimony to today's professional Army," says division commander Maj. Gen. Bill Caldwell. "I also think, deep down, it is a love for their other paratroopers."



    In July, amputee program manager Chuck Scoville of Walter Reed told a congressional committee that amputations accounted for 2.4 percent of all wounded in action in the Iraq war twice the rate in World Wars I and II.

    Perez is one of about 160 service members who have fought in Iraq and Afghanistan who have passed through Walter Reed's amputee patient program. The military says it does not track the number who choose to stay in the service.

    "It isn't something that historically we've had to deal with a whole lot," says Lt. Col. Frank Christopher, the surgeon for the 82nd Airborne.

    Today, Perez looks every bit the part of paratrooper tall, in ripped-ab shape and serious-looking. His uniform is sharply creased, his maroon beret sits at an exact angle above one eye and the black leather boot on his good leg gleams with a mirror shine. The only thing that sets him apart at a glance is the white running shoe on his prosthetic leg.

    Perez has to go before another medical fitness board to determine whether he will be allowed to jump again. He also must pass the fitness test for his age run two miles in just under 16 minutes and do at least 42 push-ups and 53 sit-ups in two-minute stretches.

    For now, he must content himself with a job maintaining M-16s and M-4s, machine guns and grenade launchers in his company's armory. But his dream is to attend the grueling Ranger school at Fort Benning, Ga., a serious challenge to even the most able-bodied soldier.

    "I got a lot of things to do," he said. "I want to do as much as I can, as much as they'll let me."

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    bobby7388, afsc was 545, SEI's I carried were 035, 037 and 023. Were you in the military? For your information I do put my life on the line every day. When I pull out in my truck, I could be hit by an inattetive or drunk driver. I could be shot or stabbed by a mad homeowner because they think I am ripping them off. I could be a random target of a drive by. I could be killed performing my job because some stationary engineer thought they knew HVAC and did an install as a side job and mislabeled the high voltage. Hell a meteror could fall out of the sky and mash me. If any of the above happened, whould that make me a hero? AS someone else stated, a hero is the person that, day-to-day, is out there, providing and doing what they can for their family. Bootlin, thank you for serving too. I spent my first 7 years in mobile tactical recon. Got a chance to see a lot. Been retired for 11 years now. I guess you are right about clarifying the definition of hero. I just get tired of hearing the term hero used so much it's meaning has become lost. As for the young soldier who lost his leg; I consider him a courageous young man trying to overcome his loss. Not a hero though.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,739
    Maybe a hero is defined by the person who calls him that. The media overplays and blows up everything that will sell. Its a disgrace. We all know of individuals who are heroes and we also know a much larger group of people who are called heroes and are BS artists.
    there but for the grace of god, go all of us

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Buffalo N.Y.
    Posts
    1,571
    Yes troy, I was in the Air Force(81150).

    By the way, what is a afsc 545?

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    AFSC 545X0 was Refrigeration and Air Conditioning. It was combined with Cryogenics production and later Heating was included. The AF changed the numeric designators so I couldn't tell you what the 545 changed to.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    91

    He Rows

    I am a veteran of SEA and SWA campaigns as an infantryman and artilleryman, respectively, in the USA (CIB) and TNARNG. I volunteered both times.
    I was a hero to my children until their mother divorced me and I didn't fight back. She has sole custody.
    I think the term works as a definition of one who voluntarily takes the heat for another with little regard for his own safety.
    Two female EMTs roared in a screaming ambulance to my rooming house yesterday and administered first aid to an old resident who had suffered a stroke.
    I thanked them as they took him to the public hospital for being first responders on the firing line for Homeland Security.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    Fight back, don't roll over and take it.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    290
    All firefighters, police and military personnel may not deserve hero statis, but they certainly deserve our thanks for the job they do and one heck of a lot more money for doing it!

  9. #22
    Originally posted by bobby7388
    Originally posted by acmanko
    Anybody that makes a living off tax payers money is not a hero


    Were you born an idiot, or is it something you had to work at?
    Now that wasnt very nice.

    Consider the source. If boot said it, I would have figured he'd lost his mind. But that's only because I kinda know the guy. And he's level headed.

    And all of us can have an off day. Hell, I'd love to come inhere and just say exactely what's on my mind.

    But that would not be "me". And it would not do anyone any good.


    The Bible clearly says that to speak to a fool like he is a regular person ... is in itself foolishness.


    I'm not sugesting you apologise to acman ... I'm just sharing my opinion that what you said to him was not very nice.

  10. #23
    Are you guys serious. Someone goes and fights for our country and pays the ultimate price is a hero in my book anyday. To give your life for someone else is the most selfless act there is. Police officers die everyday protecting our rights as individuals and firemen and women rush into burning buildings that everyone else tries to escape. If we did not have these people would any of you rush into a burning building to make sure there is no one inside or would you just stay safe and look after yourselves.

    We never meet these people and we take them for granted. We think that they will always be there. They are our little angles that sit on our shoulders watching our backs. Whithout our "HEROS" to watch over us we would all be speaking German or Japaneese right now. The word "HERO" might be used to liberally but in the cases of our armed forces, police and fire fighters we do not say that enough.

    Let me make one thing clear there are some bad apples but do not them spoil the bunch. I know there are bad cops, fire fighters and military personal but to do want they do so I can sleep under a free and safe sky ..... They are my HEROS!!!!!!!! God Bless Them and Keep Them Safe.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    forney texas
    Posts
    17,890
    I'm sorry, but a hero would not go on strike for more pay and better benifits

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    20,677
    Originally posted by acmanko
    I'm sorry, but a hero would not go on strike for more pay and better benifits
    ================================================== =========

    In other words, he wouldn't belong to a union?
    No reserve. No retreat. No regrets.

    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

    http://www.airwarvietnam.com/16thSOSGunners2.jpg

    Proud member of KA Club

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Buffalo N.Y.
    Posts
    1,571
    Originally posted by acmanko
    I'm sorry, but a hero would not go on strike for more pay and better benifits
    Well! i'd have to agree with you here, you are sorry, and very cynical.

    BC explained heroism very well and still you find a way to belittle them, question their sacrifice by questioning their motive.
    And also, the military cannot go on strike, so scratch that one.

    Some people are just angry at the world.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event