Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 26

Thread: A/C overheating

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    suburbs outside New York City
    Posts
    71

    Arrow A/C overheating

    Here is the history:
    First season the system was installed, it started blowing warm air. Installer came & told us "central a/c can freeze up sometimes so next time turn it off for 1/2 hour then turn it back on". We didn't know any better, did what he suggested and it always came back on. This has been going on for years. Some seasons it worked with no problem. Other seasons it may have turned off once. Last year worked all season. This summer was as follows: June - suddenly was blowing warm air. We turned it off for two hours then it came back on. Service tech came out & could not find a problem but put in a new capacitor anyway. We had a heat wave for two weeks 99 -105 - system never turned off but the inside temperature on my first floor would not go below 73 and the upstairs would not get cooler than 76 until the evenings when it was about 80 outside. After heat wave, it worked well then last weekend; outside temp was 85 with low humidity. Started blowing warm air. Turned it off for an hour and it went back on and has worked perfectly since. I have had a service contract with the same company for 8 years now. Two years ago during annual check-up needed to add 1/2lb freon, last year none was required but beginning of this season put in 1 lb. Had a new Service company come to look at it today. Said no freon needed, compressor working and checked out. I don't know what he checked outside but told me to set thermostat low so compressor stayed on. Never looked at unit "inside" the house just outside but used a device to check temperature of air coming from my vents indoors. Following is his diagnosis today: right now a/c working like a charm, no fluid needed, but amp (think that is the word used) was twice what it should be indicating that the compressor struggling to keep up. Said it was never freezing up (as I was told by original installer) instead it was overheating and by turning it off for 1/2 - 1 hour cooled off the compressor and got the system going again. Said this usually occurs when compressor is getting old. (my home is 10 years old). I asked, then way has it been doing this on and off since house was built? His reply was that compressor was defective. Does any of this make sense? Something doesn't sound right to us but we are not the experts. Is there something I should say to them or ask if they checked? Please help!!!! He was at my home for 20 minutes and never checked the inside unit. He told me we may want to think about getting a new compressor R22 (which he said there are none around) or put in an brand new everything!!! I need your opinions please. Oh, and I think these guys talk to the service company I have been using for the past 8 years.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Saint Augustine, Florida, United States
    Posts
    1,149
    Something is wrong. Neither are telling you the whole story. You shouldn't have to turn your unit off for 1/2 an hour to make it work. That is my opinion....for all that it is worth. 2nd company was an ad running a "tune-up" special?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    suburbs outside New York City
    Posts
    71
    Let me explain that the company the builder used for installation is "not" the same company that I have had an 8 year contract with. Its the new company that came in yesterday and company I have the 8 yr contract with, I later heard, send each other customers. Both of them told me that I should never have had to turn system off/on - that it sounded like I had a defective compressor from the very beginning. Do you still think they are hiding something? or are they just too lazy to find the problem and would rather try and get us to buy a new compressor or whole new system?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Quesnel, BC Canada
    Posts
    28
    I tend to believe the best about people so I think perhaps they are really jus missing your diagnosis. If you a/c blows warm air (ever) there is a problem. If your compressor runs, chances are that it's ok, tho I have seen the run but have faulty valves. But if it overheats there is deffenitely a problem. You really need to find someone who will get the proper information eg. Subcooling, superheat discharge temp amperage airflow etc. I think it would be better to get someone else even if they do change it out as these guys seem to be confused a bit - lol
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day.
    But if you set him on fire he'll be warm for the rest
    of his life!"

    My wife says i never finish anyth

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,152
    Quote Originally Posted by NewYorkMinute View Post
    He told me we may want to think about getting a new compressor R22 (which he said there are none around)
    This is simply not true. There may be shortages occasionally but R22 compressors are still in major production.

    I'd find someone else to service the equipment. Find a friend or neighbor who will refer you a qualified licensed contractor.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Milwaukee Wisconsin
    Posts
    984
    It all sounds like BS! (from your posts - not replies)

    If these were your first 2 opinions. Get a third!

    From what your saying, (shooting from the hip) it sounds like an air flow problem. Any restriction? filter, zone dampers, or bypass ...

    Does not sound at all like a compressor.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,881
    Quote Originally Posted by NewYorkMinute View Post
    Here is the history:
    (Clipped...) This summer was as follows: June - suddenly was blowing warm air. We turned it off for two hours then it came back on. Service tech came out & could not find a problem, but put in a new capacitor anyway. We had a heat wave for two weeks 99 -105 - system never turned off but the inside temperature on my first floor would not go below 73 and the upstairs would not get cooler than 76 until the evenings when it was about 80 outside. After heat wave, it worked well then last weekend; outside temp was 85 with low humidity. Started blowing warm air. Turned it off for an hour and it went back on and has worked perfectly since.

    I have had a service contract with the same company for 8 years now. Two years ago during annual check-up needed to add 1/2lb freon, last year none was required but beginning of this season put in 1 lb. Had a new Service company come to look at it today. Said no freon needed, compressor working and checked out. I don't know what he checked outside but told me to set thermostat low so compressor stayed on.

    Never looked at unit "inside" the house just outside but used a device to check temperature of air coming from my vents indoors.

    Following is his diagnosis today: right now a/c working like a charm, no fluid needed, but amp (think that is the word used) was "twice" what it should be indicating that the compressor struggling to keep up.

    Said it was never freezing up (as I was told by original installer) instead it was overheating and by turning it off for 1/2 - 1 hour cooled off the compressor and got the system going again. Said this usually occurs when compressor is getting old. (my home is 10 years old). I asked, then way has it been doing this on and off since house was built? His reply was that compressor was defective.

    Does any of this make sense? Something doesn't sound right to us but we are not the experts. Is there something I should say to them or ask if they checked? Please help!!!! He was at my home for 20 minutes and never checked the inside unit. He told me we may want to think about getting a new compressor R22 (which he said there are none around) or put in an brand new everything!!! I need your opinions please. Oh, and I think these guys talk to the service company I have been using for the past 8 years..
    - but amp (think that is the word used) was "twice" what it should be indicating that the compressor struggling to keep up.
    They need to troubleshoot until they find out why the compressor is over amping! Could be high resistance somewhere in the circuit. Could also be problems in the refrigerant system. A hot gas discharge line restriction, or partially plugged muffler, can cause very high amp draw.

    Any electric heat elements cycling on?
    Heat pump or A/C?

    Just curious, - what refrigerant control does it have?
    Last edited by udarrell; 08-12-2010 at 01:36 PM. Reason: Quote... hot gas restriction...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas,NV
    Posts
    744
    Quote Originally Posted by powell View Post
    This is simply not true. There may be shortages occasionally but R22 compressors are still in major production.

    I'd find someone else to service the equipment. Find a friend or neighbor who will refer you a qualified licensed contractor.
    The tech was probably refering to condensing units and the HO is mistaking it for compressors.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    suburbs outside New York City
    Posts
    71
    Being a homeowner, I don't understand your question. One of the professional members on this site provided me with a Checklist for Troubleshooting. There are about 20 things/readings that he said they should be checking and once they have all that info should immediately be able to figure it out. I called the service company this morning and told them I was not paying them until the came back and provided me with a diagnosis instead of a symptom. I also emailed the check list. They told me they would not charge me for yesterday then called back and said the owner wanted to come tomorrow, go through my list and figure out what is wrong. I told them to come hoping the owner knows what he is doing.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    suburbs outside New York City
    Posts
    71
    Udarrell, I have natural gas heating (if that is of any help). Can you suggest a few things I should ask him - to make sure he checked. the following is the check list I am giving him: Is this enough?

    1. Establish airflow over the indoor coil.
    a. Return Static Pressure
    b. Supply Static Pressure
    c. Total External Static Pressure
    d. Use of fan curve or V/S CFM Counter
    2. Determine what the metering device is.
    3. Get all refrigerant readings:
    a. Hi side pressure/temp
    b. Hi side LLT
    c. Sub-cooling
    d. Lo side pressure/temp
    e. Lo side SLT
    f. Lo side Super-heat
    g. Outdoor temperature
    h. Outdoor unit discharge temperature
    i. Indoor dry bulb temperature
    j. Return air dry bulb temperature (they could be different if there's air leaks in the return duct)
    k. Return air wet bulb temperature
    l. System primary line voltage
    m. System operating load voltage (compare to data plate requirements)
    n. Outdoor unit total amps (compare to data plate requirements)
    o. Outdoor fan amps (compare to data plate requirements)
    p. Compressor amps running (compare to data plate requirements)
    q. Compressor amps starting
    r. Repeat voltage/amps for indoor blower motor

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,152
    Quote Originally Posted by sammy37 View Post
    The tech was probably refering to condensing units and the HO is mistaking it for compressors.
    I thought about that also but his next comment was "or put in an brand new everything!!!"

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    suburbs outside New York City
    Posts
    71
    Sorry I realize I don't know anything about this business but the tech said at the very least I should replace the "entire" outside unit (thought that was called the compressor) but would probably not be able to find any R22's. So his final suggestion was to replace "everything" both inside and out and get a tax write-off.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,881
    Quote Originally Posted by NewYorkMinute View Post
    Udarrell, I have natural gas heating (if that is of any help). Can you suggest a few things I should ask him - to make sure he checked. the following is the check list I am giving him: Is this enough?

    1. Establish airflow over the indoor coil.
    a. Return Static Pressure
    b. Supply Static Pressure
    c. Total External Static Pressure
    d. Use of fan curve or V/S CFM Counter
    2. Determine what the metering device is.
    3. Get all refrigerant readings:
    a. Hi side pressure/temp
    b. Hi side LLT
    c. Sub-cooling
    d. Lo side pressure/temp
    e. Lo side SLT
    f. Lo side Super-heat
    g. Outdoor temperature
    h. Outdoor unit discharge temperature
    i. Indoor dry bulb temperature
    j. Return air dry bulb temperature (they could be different if there's air leaks in the return duct)
    k. Return air wet bulb temperature
    l. System primary line voltage
    m. System operating load voltage (compare to data plate requirements)
    n. Outdoor unit total amps (compare to data plate requirements)
    o. Outdoor fan amps (compare to data plate requirements)
    p. Compressor amps running (compare to data plate requirements)
    q. Compressor amps starting
    r. Repeat voltage/amps for indoor blower motor
    Since a restricted hot discharge-gas-line or muffler could cause the high amp draw, check the discharge line temp for large variations with an infrared TH could indicate a problem. It may or may not have a muffler installed on the hot discharge line.

    The condenser fan motor maybe switching to its low speed, or it is delivering low RPM.

    Look for bad electrical circuitry, - cut all power & feel for hot places, also use volt meter & ohm meter.


    All Capacitors wired correctly?

    It sounds like this condenser may have had a problem when it came off the production line...(?) However, the problem(s) could be elsewhere.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event