Air handler in garage sweats a lot - Page 2
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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    406
    Stop right there. Hands up. Step away from the unit

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    11
    Originally posted by ham&egger
    Stop right there. Hands up. Step away from the unit
    WHY? are comming to help the widow? or me? for free?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Niceville,Fl.
    Posts
    65
    Where in Florida?I'm here too. Sorry to hear you have a Rheem But they will work and last as long as there installed correctly and charged right.Rheem has reduced the size of thier equiptment so as to fit in more places this cause a rise in static pressure. If you don't have a large enough return the air flow acrossed the coil will be reduced and the unit will runn colder causeing the unit to sweat like a pig.It may also be something as simple as the screws in the center and the top of the face not being tight.but more likely the ducting was not resized to accomadate the new airhandler.Rheem is know to have this problem.the flang thing is a concern but you should have a pro go into that if it's not been looked into already.I'm in Ft.myers by the way.
    Too Old to be doing this

  4. #17
    If you have a variable speed air handler and it wasn't wired to the tstat correctly then that could happen. Also, yes you do need to have a pro measure your static pressure. It sounds to me like it could either have too small of a return or some other sort of air restriction.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    11

    It is over ,

    sorry guys, especially Dash, thanks a lot, the only way to find out for me was to wait for the season, so I follow advice, resized the takeoff to 12 by 18 by 18 high instead of the typical wraparound the unit, and now the unit looks funny with that "neck" but 80% of the sweat is GONE!!!!! I love you guys (non gay way)the remaining 20% I is a combination of: we live in a imperfect world, has been raining non stop for 40 days(humidity levels way high), bill(kilowatts) drop dramatically, Happy camper here, etc etc. Thanks again.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Great,gald it worked out for you.Thanks for the followup.

    I've been looking at old equipment that we replace,seldom find a Rheem with the flanges bent up,and all had a plenum the size of the air handler.Really makes you wonder how the customer put up with the problems and what it cost them over the years.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Hmm why did it work????

    Allow me to take a stab at it.

    You had a 2.5 ton air handler in there before which probably had duct for 2 or 2.5 tons on it. Now you have a 3 ton air handler on 2-2.5 tons worth of duct. This would be a marginal or slightly undersized duct system.

    If you have a marginal duct system the airflow will be limited. The instructions show that you can lose as much as .1" if a static regain collar is not used. Now, to make this clear, on a GOOD duct system you will gain nothing and it is a non issue. On a marginal or slightly poor duct that .1" can mean as much as 150 cfm. On a bad duct system, you need to fix the duct. 150 cfm can increase the coil temperature and the temperature of the air as well. That 100-150 cfm probably saved you more than a little sweat on the unit, it probably saved your compressor also. You were probably close to freezing your coil.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    BTW if your garage conditions are that bad you may want to insulate the airhandler to eliminate the additional 20% of losses.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Originally posted by dash
    Great,gald it worked out for you.Thanks for the followup.

    I've been looking at old equipment that we replace,seldom find a Rheem with the flanges bent up,and all had a plenum the size of the air handler.Really makes you wonder how the customer put up with the problems and what it cost them over the years.
    The flanges alone can cause a 20-25% airflow loss if not folded up.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Doc,

    No regain collar ,it losses .1 ,so if we measure the ESP and it .5,where on the fan chart would we find the correct cfms that are really being delivered,at .6?

    Tabs left down,loses 20 to 25% of cfms,what effect will we see when testing the ESP and using the fan data chart?


    Thanks ,dash






  11. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Yes and no....

    .5 is really on even tonage units about all you can make. maybe .6. So if you read .6 " you could lower it to .5" by adding the collar and looking at the chart you can see the potential difference.

    At a lower total of say .4 or .3 you would not gain anything.

    The tabs on the otherhand eat the available static. If you left them down at a total of say .3 you would still have nominal airflow. if your duct was designed at .5 you might see ,5 or ,6 but the chart would not reflect the true airflow because the fan has passed its limit and the fan curve falls becuase the RPM has maxed out.

    1/2 ton models still have another speed available (low for 2.5 ton high for 3 ton in this example is generally used) you could, on a 2.5 ton go to high to recover some but with the 3 you're already on high.

    the ECM model of course will overcome most of these issues but it doesnt make sense to handicap the machines efficiency because one would be too lazy to install a proper duct system.

    You have to realize, many of the static regain issues came up with the RBHA air handler which was admittadly weak and were resolved with the RBHC air handler. The instructions we not modified much from one to the other. Both really require a proper duct system as all systems should have, the equipment is only as good as the installation as we all know. Poor duct systems should be fixed non the less.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    11
    Originally posted by docholiday
    BTW if your garage conditions are that bad you may want to insulate the airhandler to eliminate the additional 20% of losses.
    This is not my turf, just to help you separate the tech from the "facts" my garage is like any other garage in south Florida, the 80% "solution" increases to 90% if let the unit ON instead of AUTO and goes to 100% (bone dry) if use ultra cheap filter instead of an expensive, more restrictive I guess, one. There is no loses in this case, all gain, unless you call 120 dollars for 30 days of Power bill in brutal summer losses.(74F) Hope this help you.

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