Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 21

Thread: Curve Sheets

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    126
    Where do you find curve sheets? Supply house acts like we are crazy if we ask about them.

  2. #2
    Baker Distributing has them. I asked the guy at United and he gave me something that was not even close. And this was AFTER he gave me that same dirty look.

    They ARE out there.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Medford Oregon
    Posts
    807
    Copeland
    you see curve sheets also can download "cpCalc", a
    program you can use to produce curves on the fly
    go to
    http://www.emersonclimatecontractor.com
    (you have to register to view/get data - but woth it)

    Carlyle (Carrier)
    "CarWin", a program similar to "cpCalc" is available
    go to
    http://www.carlylecompressor.com

    both are free and all quality mechanics have these (maybe?)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,815
    ASHRAE
    Quote
    “Engineers like to solve problems. If there are no problems handily available, they will create their own." Scott Adams

    "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."
    Albert Einstein

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    Right on rocket. I've had CpCalc since it came out, in my laptop. There was an older version, but the new one rocks.

    The sheets are in the Copeland Blue Binders, too, if they still give those out. Copeland wholesalers should have those. "Application Engineering" manuals...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    Just for kicks, I installed Carwin.

    Nice little program.

    TGIDWOTMC, though.

    (Thank God I Don't Work On Too Many Carlyles)



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    182
    I agree those above, for Copeland look at CpCalc. To find it you can also go to http://www.Copeland-Corp.com, click Online Product Information, sign in or register (first time only), click on dowload, now choose Performance Calculator. You can put it on your desktop so the next time you use it just click your desktop.

    This program you have to update every 90 days. This is so you have the most current, along with the older models. To update open the program, get to the second screen or so on the top title bar, click on the help button, you will see Download Updates click this. It will ask you to enter your email address and update your program in 30 to 60 seconds.

    This program will allow you to enter your exact pressures, volts, temperatures,etc.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    182
    Any "Primesource" (full line Copeland)wholesaler does have the printed curves. Some of the counter guys just don't what they are.

    As of recently Copeland does not print the curves any more !! Take care of the ones you have. DON'T throw any away. From now on you will be getting them electronically. I don't like it but that's progress.

    The Application Engineering Bulletins are still being printed but stay tuned. You can also get those from the web page under "Publications"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    Originally posted by basser


    As of recently Copeland does not print the curves any more !! Take care of the ones you have. DON'T throw any away. From now on you will be getting them electronically. I don't like it but that's progress.

    No, that's called "regress".

    I do carry a laptop at all times, with a LOT of useful programs on it, but I'm one of only a few that I know of.

    Those printed charts were invaluable before I could afford to drop 3 grand on a second computer. I hate to think that the techs coming into the field on't have access to them. I used to carry them in a binder in the truck.

    What a shame. Are they going to lower the price on the discus #26 and #43 valve plates in return??????

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Eastern Washington
    Posts
    2,990
    OK guys, I'll admit that I don't know what you're talking about here. I kinda understand "what", but I don't understand the "why" fully I don't think. Could you xplain please. Is this something you need to do regularily, or are there warning signs, and you run this to confirm something?

    [Edited by TB on 10-01-2004 at 05:28 AM]
    TB
    Everyone knows something I don't.

    2 Chronicles 7:14
    14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and will heal their land.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    310

    Talking

    TB - I will add my .02 to the mix. The curves are very valualbe in determining whether a compressor is working properly, installed in the correct temp environment and operating within its design parameters. I was lucky and discovered the curves and info long ago. I'm anal enough I look at them all the time and when a new compressor or system goes in all of the information is compared to the proper curve for the compressor. I can then veryify it is working right where it should be when things are done. All of the info is very valualble to me but like I said above, I am anal. DaleP

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    A lot of outside factors can effect, adversely, a "vacuum decay" test for bad valves in a semiherm. Closing off the SSV and jamming the pressure switch, then shuttin it down and looking for an increase in crankcase pressure OFTEN works, but is NOT always 100% accurate, and, frankly, could result in expensive parts (Like those effing valveplates, COPELAND. ) being changed, when they're not really the problem.

    If you run the curve, (VERY EASY to do) you will know for a fact whether or not there is a real problem with compressor capacity/efficiency.

    All you need is a set of gauges, and a DVM, and, of course, the curve sheets or the Energy Calculator. (What I use, now.)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    126
    Folks and their abbreviations....whats a DVM stand for? Thats why I didnt join the military is I hate abbrreviations

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event