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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    5,673
    Fail... An encapsulation should be air tight. You can't expect a 90 pint dehumidifier to dehumidify the world. We do have to leave a termite inspection strip at the sill. All foundation vents should be sealed. We use 15-20 mil white scrimmed liner. Foundation walls should be insulated (rigid foam or spray foam) Did you pay them to encapsulate or to lay plastic? All piers and foundation walls should be caulked/mastic to make an airtight seal to the liner.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    12

    Regarding encapuslation...

    Crap. Thank you for your feedback. They did not insulate the foundation walls. You are right. They basically laid plastic down. I am paying 6K...I would think that would cover a true encapsulation. I haven't paid anything yet. Is this ballpark of what I would expect to pay for an encapsulation done the right way?

    Thanks - Ron


    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    Fail... An encapsulation should be air tight. You can't expect a 90 pint dehumidifier to dehumidify the world. We do have to leave a termite inspection strip at the sill. All foundation vents should be sealed. We use 15-20 mil white scrimmed liner. Foundation walls should be insulated (rigid foam or spray foam) Did you pay them to encapsulate or to lay plastic? All piers and foundation walls should be caulked/mastic to make an airtight seal to the liner.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    5,673
    How many sqft?

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    12
    2250 sq ft.

    Ron

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    5,673
    Pricing is not allowed but that is waaaaaaayyyyyyyy (emphasis) too low to do it right. X3 plus a little is approximately what we charge prices varies depending on how high the crawl is and how easy it is to maneuver. Encapsulation is a very time consuming process.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    5,673
    Most times just covering the ground real good will solve the moisture issues but there's no sense in a dehu if its not sealed. Pest control guys don't seem to understand what an encapsulation is. You are paying for minimal sealing and plastic and will be wasting energy running the dehu.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    12
    Gotcha. I had two quotes and both were similar. My main problem was sweating duct work during the hot months. Water would drip and pool and the wood underneath would become saturated. I had two options re-wrapping or encapsulation. Knowing your info now, I guess I'll focus on getting them to seal the vapor barrier to the wall and doing a better job at wrapping the piers. What do you think? They have been working on this for about a day and a half and are coming back to finish. They are "moisture control" experts. 4 guys.

    What is your opinion of a separate duct kit running off the dehum. unit. The sales guy said not necessary. The house is a brick ranch. Basically a brick rectangle.

    Ron



    Do you think this will solve my sweating duct problem? - Other than the sweating ducts, I am dry the rest of the year.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    5,673
    If the duct is insulated then it will most likely solve your problem by just covering the floor. Most times when I find ducts that are insulated sweating in a crawl it is from moisture wicking from the ground, and by laying a vapor barrier on the ground the ducts don't do this anymore. If the ducts are uninsulated, surely not in sc, them you must wrap them unless the crawlspace is brought into the thermal envelope and conditioned. Even them you would still want to seal and wrap the ducts so you get the air where its supposed to go and at the right temp to efficiently heat/cool the living space.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    12

    Not sure about quality of work...

    Hi there - see attached. Is this the right way to seal the vapor-barrier to the brick foundation? My contractors used great stuff spray foam. Also have some big gaps behind piers and around piers due to shape of cinder block.

    My problem was dripping duct work during the summer months. This might be OK to fix it...I won't know till July - August.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    If the duct is insulated then it will most likely solve your problem by just covering the floor. Most times when I find ducts that are insulated sweating in a crawl it is from moisture wicking from the ground, and by laying a vapor barrier on the ground the ducts don't do this anymore. If the ducts are uninsulated, surely not in sc, them you must wrap them unless the crawlspace is brought into the thermal envelope and conditioned. Even them you would still want to seal and wrap the ducts so you get the air where its supposed to go and at the right temp to efficiently heat/cool the living space.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    5,673
    I guess its ok, kind of half a$$ed looking to me. It will probably solve your problem but is not the best way of doing it. You would benefit from insulating the perimeter walls since it looks like you have no floor insulation. Rigid foam taped at seams or spray foam.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    12
    What should the moisture content of the wood in crawl space be to inhibit fungi growth?

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    2,919
    I like to see the Wood Moisture Content (WMC) below 16%. Mold does not grow on wood till it has a WMC of about 20%.

    But I like a safety margin. I would recommend a remote hygrometer installed in your crawlspace so you can monitor the conditions in the crawlspace. You want the relative humidity 80% or less.

    I have found Vinyl Gutter sealant sticks to the plastic sheeting better than anything else. You can buy it at Lower in a caulking tube. It also sticks to masonry. Most adhesives do not stick to plastic sheeting at all. Duct tape does fairly well also.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    2,919
    Sorry. I meant to say you can buy the vinyl gutter adhesive at Lowes. Or Home Depot.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

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