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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4

    Troubleshooting a Goodman heat pump

    What is that law that says if something breaks, it's going to happen when you need it most? It was 101 degrees here in VA yesterday, and I started having issues with my outdoor Goodman GSH13 heat pump. My house was getting warm, went outside, and realized the HP was off. Checked the breaker, it was tripped, so I reset it. Checked the fuses in the disconnect, and one was blown. Replaced it, started the unit, and got the familiar buzz when the unit is getting power but nothing is running. Compressor WAS running, condenser fan was not. Tried to spin the condenser fan with a stick, and would not catch. I turned the unit off, and let it sit like that overnight.

    This morning I went out, flipped the disconnect on, same thing happened, except the compressor stopped trying to run after about a second or two. After the compressor stopped running, I WAS able to manually get the condenser fan to run full speed. When the compressor tried to kick in (about every 2 or 3 minutes), I measured voltage coming into the unit, and it had dropped to around113 Volts (from 120). So it seems that the compressor is certainly trying to draw sufficient current, something just isn't working.

    Is this a symptom of a bad capacitor (not providing enough juice for BOTH compressor and fan to run), or is a failing compressor more likely?

    Thanks for any advice!

    -James

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,858
    It's a symptom of needing a service call before you get hurt, or seriously damage your system.
    "Hey Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort." And he says, "there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice. - Carl Spackler

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Current whereabouts unknown
    Posts
    632
    you need a new one
    It matters not how strait the gate,
    How charged with punishments the scroll,
    I am the master of my fate:
    I am the captain of my soul.

    -- William Ernest Henley

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4
    I'm sorry, I should have been clearer - I'm not planning on doing repairs myself. I'm just trying to get an idea of the scope. If it's a capacitor, that's a heck of a lot quicker and cheaper to have replaced than a new unit. And given that it's been 100+ degrees almost all week, HVAC techs are difficult to get ahold of, and are charging a premium. Would just like to know what I'm getting into up front...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    17,599
    We dont charge a premium when it hot out or when its cold out...standard rates still apply no matter what the temperature....what a dingbat thing to say.
    "The road to Hell is paved with progressive policies."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4
    Wasn't implying that ALL HVAC techs charge premiums during 100+ degree weather. Just the one I've been talking to whose current diagnostic rate is higher than published earlier this summer. Not everyone does business the same way...

    Moderators, please delete this thread if you have a chance, I think I've just managed to piss people off instead of asking an answerable question. Thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    382
    James, there are people naturally more unkind than others, but there are many nice ones such as 2old2rock who are really trying to help.

    Your 113/120V reading is telling us that you are probably not used to this electric stuff. I personally believe you only have a simple electrical problem. Call a tech, yes you may have to pay 100-200-300, but it's better than getting injured.

    Quote Originally Posted by cwheel View Post
    Wasn't implying that ALL HVAC techs charge premiums during 100+ degree weather. Just the one I've been talking to whose current diagnostic rate is higher than published earlier this summer. Not everyone does business the same way...

    Moderators, please delete this thread if you have a chance, I think I've just managed to piss people off instead of asking an answerable question. Thanks

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4
    I appreciate all of the responses - and you were correct, it was a simple electrical issue. The capacitor was bad - it had a slight bulge to the bottom, which I understand is a possible symptom of a bad one. A new one fixed it.

    And not that it matters, but I mentioned the 113V because a voltage dip is a typical occurance when starting a motor. I included that bit of info to show that the compressor was still creating a draw on the system (and it wasn't a safety device that was malfunctioning). I should have mentioned that so you knew that I am used to electric stuff Thanks again!

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