Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Alaskan Oil

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Memphis TN USA
    Posts
    6,945
    I am for saving our oil for the future. Oil will only get more rare.
    Oil hit $50 a barrel not to long ago. If oil is an investment in our future, we must decide when to cash in. That time is coming. Besides if we wait too long it will lose its value and we will have saved it for nothing. Just like R12. I saved mine for a while. Sold it for $50/lb. Now it is worth alot less. There are too many replacements for it.

    It would be an easier decision if one drunken captian did not try to power off the rocks and fill the whole sound with oil.

    I say $60/barrel is high enough. We will be there next summer. Crank up the production at $60. Ratchet it up a notch every $5 after that.
    If the superheat ain't right it ain't charged right.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    393
    OPEC finally went on record to say that there is no more oil to "crank up". Excess supply is just about gone as demand overseas goes up. As China uses more oil, we will have to bid for it from them, our domestic supply will not even meet half our demand.

    As evidenced by the latest batch of hybrid cars, Detroit and the rest of the automakers know that oil production is in decline; they are gearing up alternatives.

    For all those who still think this is an oil conspiracy and all that has to happen is for more to be produced, go ahead and think that. Oil producers are pretty much max'ed out. A quart or two won't run the Hummer over a couple of miles.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Dallas/Ft Worth, TX
    Posts
    439
    What about ethanol? Why can't we use corn squeezins? It would help our farmers out. We have the most productive farms in the world. I'm all for alternative fuels if they work like gasoline. I don't want to be driving a shoebox going 45 mph. I think we should do 3 things. 1. tap our own oil reserves. 2. research alternative fuels 3. conservation. Why aren't we building a mass transit system? Have you seen the train system in Japan? You don't need a car there the trains go everywhere. Why can't the greatest nation on earth (that would be the USA, motorboy1, john145, and remember)figure out a way to become less reliant on foreign oil? Maybe we could harness the energy of the hot air eminating from the left.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Dallas/Ft Worth, TX
    Posts
    439
    I really like the "off the grid" houses. My next house will be one. If we all made our homes "off the grid" it would cut down on the amount of oil, natural gas, and coal used in power generation. The initial cost of an "off the grid" house is higher but it pays for itself quickly.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    1,936
    alternative fuel sources are there take soy oil it can power diesel trucks but do you hear anything abouth it, no you dont, the goverment would rather spend big bucks on fancy tech research.
    not too long ago on tv the tech channel had this place in philadelphia that could make oil out of garbage saw it once on tv and never heard of it again, it's money if you got it you can do anything without it your **** out of luck

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Memphis TN USA
    Posts
    6,945
    I saw a thing on TV about ethanol used in Brazil. Ethanol cut the life of the engine head in half. I'm sure they could make a better head (like when we stopped using leaded gas).


    Saw a thing about wind power in OK. They had a program to install them for free. All you have to do is maintain it. 15 years later most of them where disconnected. The maintenence on the invertors was too expensive.

    There is a company in CA that makes solar shingles. 10KW system costs $9K. They say it is reasonable compared to cost of electricity in southern CA, but it probably involves loan payments on a 30 year note. The maintenence on the invertor bothers me after the story from OK.
    If the superheat ain't right it ain't charged right.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    393

    That's just it....

    ...most of the current "alternatives" are not cost effective. Necessity is the mother of invention, and when necessity is there, the technology will improve in efficiency and the cost will come down.

    Alot of people jump on the bandwagon for the alternative fuels, but also complain that too much is being spent on the technology to make them as cost effective as crude oil products. I can see it already, when soy, hydrocell, and ethanol technologies are improved, there will be a group to protest those fuels and their "dangers to the environment and our way of life". You can write it down that you first heard it here, today, September 3, 2004!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    2,652
    Now this is THE BEST thread in this forum.

    Here in the corn belt we have been experimenting with ethanol. It's amazing how many people don't know how far it gone. Even people here in the corn belt don't know about E-85 or that there are already hundreds of thousands of cars nation wide that already run on it. I have been handing out E-85 pamphlets at our shop for a while now and people are shocked, and further amazed to see the E-85 is cheaper per gallon than regular gas. Check it out at http://www.e85fuel.com .

    We have also been seeing many big farming operations setting up large private windmills to power thier hog and poultry confinements, definately a step in the right direction.

    Sales of Corn stoves and furnaces as well as pellet stoves are WAY up. Corn heat with operating costs only rivaled by geothermal units is a great alternative. With the stoves being thermostatically controlled and with an output of 54,000btu they are a great alternate heat source. We have several customers that heat solely with corn through the entire winter. With LP gas expected to reach $2 per gallon this year I plan to sell many more. Check out the brand we sell at http://www.countryflame.com .

    I know the world depends on oil at this time but it needs to change. We don't need more oil wells, especially in Alaska. We can put a man on the moon, and damn it we can break our dependancy on oil.

    [Edited by i_got_ideas on 09-04-2004 at 03:24 AM]
    There are 3 ways to do anything in life; Good, Fast, Slow: You can pick any 2.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    2,652

    Re: That's just it....

    Originally posted by player89
    ...most of the current "alternatives" are not cost effective. Necessity is the mother of invention, and when necessity is there, the technology will improve in efficiency and the cost will come down.

    Alot of people jump on the bandwagon for the alternative fuels, but also complain that too much is being spent on the technology to make them as cost effective as crude oil products. I can see it already, when soy, hydrocell, and ethanol technologies are improved, there will be a group to protest those fuels and their "dangers to the environment and our way of life". You can write it down that you first heard it here, today, September 3, 2004!!
    I'll remember that, and you'r likely right. I don't know about hydrocell but there are NO toxic emmisions from soy or corn. I can't imagine water has any either, but you're probally right that someone will say there is.
    There are 3 ways to do anything in life; Good, Fast, Slow: You can pick any 2.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,739
    I think the key word here is cost effective, Maybe we should spend a little more now in order to have more later, as in alternitive fuels. These technologies are making great headway , but they are not getting the funding. Remember the 70's gas lines , the 90's epa act, not only for us but for flouresent lights? the new ballast use 1/2 the elelctric wihtout pcbs'. The problem is that all the money we saved on lights we lost on computers and toys. We will find a way, but how painful it will be, wil be determined by how much effort we put inot it now. We have gas hydrates equalling the oil reserves, but no way to use them effectively at this time. Corn, soybeans, all going well, electric cars yes, but as stated here public transportaion is sadly lacking and trains almost non existant give the size of our population. America has a love of cars and the freedom it gives, who wouldn't, but we are stealing from out great grandchildren. the rest of the world has been paying $4 a gallon for gas for a long time now. Its up to us.
    there but for the grace of god, go all of us

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event