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Thread: working abroad

  1. #1

    working abroad

    hey folks,

    I have recently received my Red Seal for "Refrigeration and AC Mechanic". Although I started with controls (programming, installing, servicing, comissioning ect...mostly Delta), I do mostly service and maintainance for HVAC now.

    I'm 28 y/o and never lived outside of eastern canada, but now that I have some credentials, and am debt free, I'd like to do some travelling/working. Can some of you recommend some good recruitment agencys, or perhaps some advice from some of you who may have some experience doing this.

    Thanks A lot!!
    Tim

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Theres a guy here called DHVAC who knows almost all there is about working a broad.
    My doctor gave me six months to live, but when I couldn't pay the bill he gave me six months more.
    Walter Matthau

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    405
    Thats almost ironic, I'm doing the same but the other way round. Currently looking into emmigrating to Canada and I'm studyng the CEC for starters, so I can sit the Red Seal when I eventually get there. I'll probably have to work as an electrician at first until I get my other licences so I can do the same job as I do over here.

    Are there any sample questions for the fridge licence like there is for the electricians?

    If your planning to come to the UK you will have to do your CITB/City & Guilds 6079 pipework and brazing, and safe gas handling to get your licence to work on fridge or aircon. I must tell you though it only lasts for 3 years, then you have to take it again. And your Canadian credentials won't be recognised as a temporary measure like they are in the Canadian Provinces. Still it shouldn't be a problem passing it though if you passed the Canadian credential. I thought it was quite straight forward and I hadn't worked in the job full time for 23 years. it cost me almost £1500.00 because I did the full two weeks to refresh my memory and learn all the new regulations and safe decanting methods. Something we didn't bother with in the eighties. The terminology is pretty much the same so you could just probably book a place for the exam and assessment and save yourself a few quid.

    Things are pretty quiet over here in the UK regarding most trades, at the moment firms are preparing for the school holiday shutdowns, but then it will go quiet again. As for aircon, your probably better off doing fridge as is tends to be all year round, whereas aircon is seasonal like it is in most countries. Residential, or domestic as its called over here is practically non existent although heat pumps are slowly becoming popular. Aircon tends to be more commercial with the majoroty being splits, and on the larger sites packaged units. Although some homes may have a split in their conservatory.

    If you want a link for the place where I took mine, leave me your email and I'll send it to you. If you decide to come to the UK of course.
    Martyn

    50 & 60 hz but 100's worse

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by chilliwilly View Post
    Thats almost ironic, I'm doing the same but the other way round. Currently looking into emmigrating to Canada and I'm studyng the CEC for starters, so I can sit the Red Seal when I eventually get there. I'll probably have to work as an electrician at first until I get my other licences so I can do the same job as I do over here.

    Are there any sample questions for the fridge licence like there is for the electricians?

    If your planning to come to the UK you will have to do your CITB/City & Guilds 6079 pipework and brazing, and safe gas handling to get your licence to work on fridge or aircon. I must tell you though it only lasts for 3 years, then you have to take it again. And your Canadian credentials won't be recognised as a temporary measure like they are in the Canadian Provinces. Still it shouldn't be a problem passing it though if you passed the Canadian credential. I thought it was quite straight forward and I hadn't worked in the job full time for 23 years. it cost me almost £1500.00 because I did the full two weeks to refresh my memory and learn all the new regulations and safe decanting methods. Something we didn't bother with in the eighties. The terminology is pretty much the same so you could just probably book a place for the exam and assessment and save yourself a few quid.

    Things are pretty quiet over here in the UK regarding most trades, at the moment firms are preparing for the school holiday shutdowns, but then it will go quiet again. As for aircon, your probably better off doing fridge as is tends to be all year round, whereas aircon is seasonal like it is in most countries. Residential, or domestic as its called over here is practically non existent although heat pumps are slowly becoming popular. Aircon tends to be more commercial with the majoroty being splits, and on the larger sites packaged units. Although some homes may have a split in their conservatory.

    If you want a link for the place where I took mine, leave me your email and I'll send it to you. If you decide to come to the UK of course.
    hey sir, how are ya?

    you won't have any trouble finding work here without a red seal, as long as you show some credentials to your boss, you can work for a fairly decent amount of cash and challenge the red seal. There is a book called "1000 questions for HVAC/R" that a lot of students have read through. I'm not too sure if it helped, I didn't read it. But I think there are about 10 different tests for the red seal in AC and R. I lucked out and got one with a lot of controls type questions on it. There are others that are more to do with refrigeration (ammonia systems, pipe sizing, etc...) but over all, I didn't find the test very hard.

    To my understanding, basically anywhere in canada you can work if you have half a clue of what your doing. With a licence, you can even work in eastern canada for a good wage.

    Where were you planning on living? I would suggest closer to the coasts. The weather is a lot more temperate and probably closer to what your used to. The west coast is absolutly beautiful all year round(Vancouver, Victoria).

    I would say you would be safe with about 1 month of funds to live off until you find a job. Mabye try to stay away from the bigger cities, at least until you get used to driving on the right side of the road.

    sorry for the late reply.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by spotts View Post
    Theres a guy here called DHVAC who knows almost all there is about working a broad.

    thanks sir, I\ll have to hit him up for some info.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by timothygkelly View Post
    thanks sir, I\ll have to hit him up for some info.
    it's a bad joke Tim sorry. Dhvac works this kind of a broad.

    My doctor gave me six months to live, but when I couldn't pay the bill he gave me six months more.
    Walter Matthau

  7. #7
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    Location
    san jose,ca.
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    SO do I

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by timothygkelly View Post
    hey sir, how are ya?

    you won't have any trouble finding work here without a red seal, as long as you show some credentials to your boss, you can work for a fairly decent amount of cash and challenge the red seal. There is a book called "1000 questions for HVAC/R" that a lot of students have read through. I'm not too sure if it helped, I didn't read it. But I think there are about 10 different tests for the red seal in AC and R. I lucked out and got one with a lot of controls type questions on it. There are others that are more to do with refrigeration (ammonia systems, pipe sizing, etc...) but over all, I didn't find the test very hard.

    To my understanding, basically anywhere in canada you can work if you have half a clue of what your doing. With a licence, you can even work in eastern canada for a good wage.

    Where were you planning on living? I would suggest closer to the coasts. The weather is a lot more temperate and probably closer to what your used to. The west coast is absolutly beautiful all year round(Vancouver, Victoria).

    I would say you would be safe with about 1 month of funds to live off until you find a job. Mabye try to stay away from the bigger cities, at least until you get used to driving on the right side of the road.

    sorry for the late reply.
    The right side of the road ha ha, if Canada didn't border with the US you'd all drive on the left like all the other commonwealth countries. Anyway I'm planning to go to Alberta in a small town near Red Deer. I have a friend that lives out there who's gonna put me up till I find a temporary place to rent. I have to finish off my house first before I get over there and get it sold , then use it as a deposit for one in Canada. I had all the forms filled out for the immigration process. Then the Canadian immigration services changed the rules and now all native English speakers have to take an English test before they can apply to work or live in Canada.

    The things that worry me though are pensions as I've hit 45, and the cold weather. When I was there back in May, early Saturday morning about 06:30 it was very frosty outside. So I decided to go for a walk and see if this "drycold" was any worse than the damp cold" we get over here. It was about -9 deg C, and it was more bearable than when its +5 deg C over here. I just had a pair of jeans, a T shirt and a pullover fleece on. I know in Alberta it averages around -25 deg C, so I'm prepared to take a chance with a few degs lower, and hope the wind doesn't bring any dampness with it.

    I have my English test booked at Liverpool University at the end of June, then I can send off the forms to their office in Sydney NS, then fingers crossed. When I was in Alberta back in May, I made some enquiries at a few electrical contractors and they were all laying off. My friends wife and family were telling me that you have to allow for up to 3 months a year with no work. I don't know if she meant in Alberta or the whole of Canada. I phoned a few food service/catering engineering companies, and they couldn't beleive that someone was looking for a job who could work on gas, electric, and fridge.

    They all asked me to send them my resume', and a couple of them suggested setting up for myself. One company asked me what kind of money I was looking for, but I have got no idea of Canadian skilled labour rates. My UK rate equates to CA $22-23 per hour (£14.00 per hour), my friend is a motor mechanic and he's on CA $35 per hour. I've seen electricians/alarm engineer/techs jobs advertised for about the same money, but via agencies though, whom I don't trust. They're OK when your desperate but at the end of the day, they're all chancers. Bye the way in my last post about City & Guilds quals, it should read 2078/9 not 6078/9. Without being modest, I have quite a few City & Guilds quals and I forget which ones they are.

    Anyway good luck with your search and I wish you all the very best.
    Martyn

    50 & 60 hz but 100's worse

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by spotts View Post
    it's a bad joke Tim sorry. Dhvac works this kind of a broad.

    Jack, quit posting pics of my wife........




    oh go ahead post away.....

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by chilliwilly View Post
    The right side of the road ha ha, if Canada didn't border with the US you'd all drive on the left like all the other commonwealth countries.
    ha!, i read that afterwards and didn't fix it up. I understand what you're saying though, at least we adopted the metric system like the rest of yas.

    Alberta is starting to pick up (to my understanding). And to tell you the truth, you shouldn't have any trouble getting on your feet at all there, esp. since you can already be put up for a bit. Try to stay away from the tar sands though....they are incredibly gross and a complete environmental disaster. Arguably one of the worst in the world. It would be a shame to be a part of it.(can you believe the technical term for forest above oil is called "overburden"? What the hell is that?)

    Eastern canada, a skilled tech can get 27/hr. More if its a supervisor or management position of course. And if you're in the union, i belive its around 36/hr.

    Anyhow, cheers, and good luck!!

    tim

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