Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1
    I am considering going to school in Las VEgas, NV.
    How much can I expect to earn coming out of school? How long does it take before I can earn a decent family wage?
    Does anyone have their own company? How much experience does one need to be effective and what can one expect to make?
    HVAC is an interesting field, I know I'd like it but I'm wondering if $7,000 is worth it for a six month class.

  2. #2
    Rick, welcome to the forum.

    As far as, is it worth it for 7 grand? You get what you pay for.
    And a seven thousand dollar education is just that!
    If the man is still working in the industry, Ron Bunker will be able to give you the scoop on life as a service tech in Las Vegas.
    Ask around at the local wholesale house. One in particular, Allied Refrigeration Supply. Ask to speak with the manager if the counter person does not know who Ron Bunker is, was.

    Ron was last working as a service manager for a service contractor in that city, wen last I heard anything about him.

    He knows this industry better than most.


    If you cant find him, post back and I will clue you in.




    However, it would be easier if you just began reading what some of the old farts in this group have to say about it themselves.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    1,625
    Originally posted by rickshaw
    I am considering going to school in Las VEgas, NV.
    How much can I expect to earn coming out of school? How long does it take before I can earn a decent family wage?
    Does anyone have their own company? How much experience does one need to be effective and what can one expect to make?
    HVAC is an interesting field, I know I'd like it but I'm wondering if $7,000 is worth it for a six month class.
    Check the area schools there carefully. Any school for that matter. I say that cause I unfortunity tried a guy that attended a LV school, as things progressed rather quickly, either he or the school was totally inept. I think some of the both of them truthfully. Don't take it as gospel any tech schools job placement promises or stats. All but a rare few IMO are full of fluff. The other fluff they pump into there prospective students is how much $$ there immediatly worth as soon as they graduate that $7000 course.

    How much you can make depends a lot on the market value of an area what type of HVAC work your getting into. Ive seen triple market value from Southren Cal compared to midwest Indiana or Kentucky. Of course my brother in law in Southren cals fixer upper home was a quarter of a million. If you can break into a healthy union shop is a plus for the $ bill end of it. I'm to far gone to put up with the local union politics here.

    I'd call a svc tech that has 5 productive yrs in under his belt becoming a hot commodity. Unless he's a bullitt head for anyone in the shop and customers to deal with, then he's only worth a kick in the arse to me.
    "The Bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Lima Ohio
    Posts
    221

    HVAC schools

    Hi Frank, I cannot find your E-mail address anymore and wondered how are you doing.
    About schools. I have taught HVAC technical school before and can tell you that like anything in life, you get from it what you put into it. There are many different levels of students that go through. Some have never done anything mechanical before. Some try to get through with the least amount of work possible, some make an effort and some are just great. This all depends on the person. I suppose that some schools are better than others. What I always stressed was study the book and learn troubleshooting. I would set faults in the HVAC lab on furnaces, a/c's, heat pumps, and refrigeration equipment then make the students track down the problems. That was most of the lab work as I figured that tracking the electrical circuits and troubleshooting were the most important things to know when going into the field. I encouraged them to work on problems in the field when I could help them and nobody would freeze to death. I had one student that on his lab final would try to track down a problem for 5 minutes then start switching the wires around in random fashion to find the problem. This was the same guy who during lab classes set back and watched everyone else and used their answers. He burnt 2 boards. I tried to flunk him out but he still got out with a C. I was so afraid that he would burn down someones house, but was powerless to stop it. If one of these fellows applies and gets a job before you go to that company, forget it. We tried to do our best. Sometimes there is only so much you can do. Hope this helps. Jeff

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    1,625
    Oh hey Jeff,
    Hope things good over there in Ohio.
    Pretty scary if an instructor sees a train wreck in the making and has little influence to stop it. The state schools near us is by far the worst sitiuation Ive ever seen or heard of in pumping guys in then out SO unprepared. We have a glutton of grads looking and looking but no skills or real knowledge to offer anyone. There are only so many new house install helpers needed. Svc end of it is getting hit hard. Surly these schools got to wake up and smell the coffee.
    "The Bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Lima Ohio
    Posts
    221
    Hi Frank,

    How are things with you? We are doing fine here. The wife is coming out of her nerve damage but it is a slow process. Did your business grow? I was just wondering how things worked out for you. Take care. Jeff

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    17

    tough decision

    Hello Rick, I just joined the forum also, it can be worth it, I graduated from a tech school in 1988 and started a job with a company at $7.00 an hour, raises were yearly, but it will take 2-5 years to obtain the experience to expect the big buck, I worked 6 years for 1 company and started my one HVAC business,owning my own business was my objective, so I dedicated myself to the schooling after tech school and the long hours and hard work it takes, this work can be seasonal so find an area that works best for you, good luck,tom

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    179

    Las vegas Tech school Graduate Here!

    My experience is, bouncing from company to company, most of the contractors just use the techs, after the season is over they lay-off keeping their close family and close friends, very cutt-throaty business, thats why the tech's are so know it all-ish, its like the hair cutting business the last hair cut is all uneven! lmao, my advise is to start out with tech school we all need a foundation, and then start the first year in a residential company, then once you feel accomplished, in service and some install, move on to a commercial company whether, in a bldg, facilities or the union company and union school, there's an idea some companies pay for some of your schooling and keep you long tem as long as your grades are good, I was a Bplus average student at the famous Education Dynamic's Institute of Las Vegas.. lost my diploma, but my grades are recorded aat the post secondary schools of educaation commission, because they were college accredited school! well hope that will help, in 1994 i graduated staarted out aat 9 per hr plus ten percent commission on parts, units, freon, it came out to 17 per hr because it was flaat rate , it was an awesome company they were the original day and night company, great people to work for and a great experience!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    179

    Rick

    i see you dont have an email listed in your profile , email me and i will, give you some more info, contacts

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    28
    I have a few questions about las vegas and the hvac field there,I live in new york city and will be moving to las vegas in april of 2005, I will be finishing my degree in hvac by that time as well, I have a 3.6 GPA righ now and would like to know in reality what kind of job I can get in vegas with a degree in hvac but no experience, also what can I do from now until april to help my chances of having a good job by the time I move there, thanks for any help or advice anyone can give me.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    179

    Exclamation mets

    Las Vegas is a killer on techs and the a/c units. New york has some good paying jobs , i believe? in peeks skill theres a company that would have paid me excellent compared to here!, except , I dont know how the cost of living standards are there, or the contractors are? or what type of work they have to do?? so to speak! Las vegas good make or break starting grounds! thats for sures! he he, I have to job interviews this coming week there, It will be interesting?you can find a job there fairly easy, and there are a lot of companies.if I had to start over I would have went into the union or a commercial outfit from the beginning! or a bldg facilites... like everyone knows, find out where you can be busy year round, cause this trade is seasonal, and the contractors will use and abuse you knowing , this! and that youre new to the trade< he he

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event