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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215

    Time for the Dutch Uncle talk.

    Originally posted by altan
    didn`t check the strainers because didn`t wanna warm the box more it was fully loaded.
    LAME-OOOOOOOO. You had the time and access to open the stems. It would 've taken five extra minutes to check the screens! A degree or ten more ouldn't have hurt at all, especially if you would've fixed it right the first time, and left there with the cases at 10 below! You're cutting corners, and that's what's got those cases running warm now.

    Originally posted by altan
    but on a balanced port txv thought because it responded to adjustment might not be the strainer?
    Absolutely 100% incorrect. It's just a TXV. Forget about the porting, it doesn't make any difference at all when the cases are down.

    Originally posted by altan
    didn`t wanna mingle with sight glass was affraid could crack it.
    Trust me, son, you ain't as tough as that sightglass. And you still don't know what the oil level is. My guess is that it's way high. Like holy sh!t high. Like bust up a valve plate if any makes it back high. Again, not slowing down and checking basic, seemingly minor things is called cutting corners, and it's causing you, your boss. and that customer unnecessary grief.

    Originally posted by altan
    definately this job needs more than me but I am the only one to steer this ship in this water.
    Bull****. It easier than you think. Print this out, go back there on a slow morning, (plan to spend the better part of a day there) and take this with you and follow the list, in order. Just do everything I tell you.

    Altan's list of things to do:
    [list][*]Left to right, write down each case temp and the time.[*]Have the store personell empty out the lefthand corner of each case, so you can get to the valves.
    {While they're working on that...}[*]Go to the condensing unit, and install your gauges on the compressor, including an extra lowside gauge on the oil pump. Write down the pressures and the time.[*]Valve off the HOT GAS DEFROST LINE before the solenoid valve, before you do anything else. Does the suction pressure change????????Write it down, yes or no. If yes, write down the new suction pressure. If yes, also, that's a problem, but we'll address that later.[*]Close off the compressor Suction Service Valve, and run the compressor down to atmospheric. Pull your LS gauge off the SSV to make sure it's actually at atmospheric.[*]Get something to catch the oil in, and put it beneath the drain hole of the compressor. (Discus it's the lower left front port.)[*]Remove the two bolts holding the port cover on, you might need to smack the oval cover with a wrench to get it loose. Catch the spring. The spring is critical. NEVER run one without that spring. Oil might come out at this point, but it might NOT. Don't be alarmed if it doesn't. If the oil sump screen doesn't come out on it's own, use two flat blade screwdrivers to pull it out. (Just put them both inside the screen, then pull the handles apart, and pull towards you with a slight twisting motion.[*]Drain all the oil out.[*]Clean the screen with brake cleaner, wipe off the spring, scrape the gasket off.[*]Using a new gasket, reinstall the screen, spring, and cover.[*]Pull the sightglass off the side (Or front, if it's on the front.) by removing the three 1/4-20 bolts. Don't lose them. You might need to smack the glass with a wrench to get IT loose, just like the oval oil drain cover. REMEMBER, that glass is sturdier than you are. Just try not to drop it six feet onto concrete. Save the gasket. You'll need that, too. Clean the inside of the glass with brake cleaner and paper towels, until you can see clearly through it. (No "ghost line" should be left on it.) [*]Reinstall the sightglass, using the old gasket and bolts. This doesn't require superhuman strength, BTW. Just tighten the bolts evenly.[*]If the oil fail control is a 'SENTRONIC', remove the sensor from the side of the oil pump.[*]Spray down the part of the sensor that goes inside the compressor with brake cleaner, make sure that the little O-ring is in place and not damaged, then reinstall the sensor.

    Remember, take your time, and work thoroughly, not quickly.
    [*]Put your gauge back on the SSV, and put your vacuum pump on the low side of the compressor, and get your air out.[*]After your vacuum is done, pump in fresh oil (Whatever poisin you choose, 408a can use any refrigerant oil...) to 1/2 sightglass. [*]Open up your SSV and start the compressor. Let it stabilize. Leave the Hot gas isolation valve closed for now.[*]Check the comressor against it's published curve. (You'll need the compressor model number, and your Copeland wholesaler can get it for you. If you don't have a Copeland wholesaler nearby, get me the model number, and I'll scan the curve and post it for you.)[*]Check the efficiency like Basser described, even if the the compressor is at it's curve.[*]Go wash your hands, dirtbag.[*]Let it pull the cases down a little, only because it seems to worry you so much. [*]Take a breather. Admire your clean sightglass and nice net oil pressure.[*]Now, pump the system down into the receiver.[*]Replace the liquid line filter-drier before going any further. If there is a suction line filter, either remove it or replace it now.[*]Go out to the cases, start left to right, remove each one of the TXV inlet strainers, and spray them out with brake cleaner. They should be 100% free of debris when they go back in. (A 'little' dirt is too much.)[*]Put the screens back in and tighten them.[*]Pull the superheat adjustment caps, turn the valves back in, (all the way.) counting the number of full turns that it takes to get back to 100% closed. [*]Now turn the stems out, exactly one half the number of turns it took to close them up in the last step. [*]Put the caps back on the valves.[*]Use a flashilight and a mirror, and look at the liquid lines in the case, as someone else mentioned, sometimes you'll find small filter-driers in each case. If they're there, remove them, and braze in the appropriate size copper tube in their place. (Remember, this lineup is going to work when you leave. Don't skip this step. Don't be afraid to get them to pull more product, either, if necessary to get to the filter-driers and anything else, like bad fan motors.)[*]Make sure all of the TXV bulbs are tight.[*]Go back to the compressor room, and evacute your system.[*]Start it back up.[*]Make sure that the liquid line sightglass is full, within a minute or two after startup.[*]Strap a thermometer probe on the suction line next to the suction service valve.[*]Record your suction, discharge, net oil, and liquid line pressures, and case temps and the time, shortly after startup.[*]Once the case fans start going again, and the temp is dropping, check the superheat at the SSV. Write it down, along with the time, and the other pressures, and anything else you think is important, and want to remember.[*]Keep an eye on the compressor oil level, you don't want to go past 3/4 sightglass. [*]Once the case discharge air temps drop off a bit, you can check the individual evaporator superheats. Set them between 8 and 4 degrees for now.
    [list]

    Now, there is more, but I think this will get you down to temp, and will prevent further grief.

    Also, print out the next post I make, I'll tell you what to take with you when you go do this, to make sure you're prepared to do this.

    DO NOT let this list of things to do intimidate you. It's easy, I do it all the time. You just need to deal with it, that's all.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215

    When you go to this store, take the following items:

    • Fresh refrigerant oil. (Get at least two gallons, just in case.)
    • New filter-driers, or cores, for the condensing unit.
    • 3 or 4 cans of CRC brake cleaner.
    • Something to drain oil into, I use el-cheapo oil plastic oil pans from the Auto Zone.
    • A five gallon gas can with a cap, to get the old oil back to the shop.
    • At least two copper couplings of the size of the liquid lines, and a couple feet of copper to remove any in-case filter-driers.
    • Multi-meter and amp clamp.
    • Spare small, oval service valve gaskets. The kind you use on K body service valves. (For the oil drain port cover.)
    • Compressor curve sheet for that compressor.
    • Spare set of gauges.
    • Accurate digital thermometer, and some foam tape to check superheat.
    • Spare vacuum pump oil.
    • Your normal service hand tools.
    • A PT chart for 408A.
    • The printed out copy of this entire thread, and printed out copies of the following links.


    http://www.sporlan.com/10-143.pdf

    http://www.sporlan.com/10-11.pdf

    http://www.sporlan.com/10-135.pdf


    Now, if that Hot gas solenoid in the last post (Remember the Hot gas solenoid?? Did I ever tell you to open it's isolation valve? ) was causing the suction pressure to rise, then it must be serviced. Hopefully it's a Sporlan valve, as they're easy to service.

    I'll help you with that, if need be, once you tell me what model number it is, whether it's an actual three way valve, or a combination of solenoids opening and closing to get hot gas.



  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,801

    Re: When you go to this store, take the following items:

    Originally posted by condenseddave
    • Fresh refrigerant oil. (Get at least two gallons, just in case.)
    • New filter-driers, or cores, for the condensing unit.
    • 3 or 4 cans of CRC brake cleaner.
    • Something to drain oil into, I use el-cheapo oil plastic oil pans from the Auto Zone.
    • A five gallon gas can with a cap, to get the old oil back to the shop.
    • At least two copper couplings of the size of the liquid lines, and a couple feet of copper to remove any in-case filter-driers.
    • Multi-meter and amp clamp.
    • Spare small, oval service valve gaskets. The kind you use on K body service valves. (For the oil drain port cover.)
    • Compressor curve sheet for that compressor.
    • Spare set of gauges.
    • Accurate digital thermometer, and some foam tape to check superheat.
    • Spare vacuum pump oil.
    • Your normal service hand tools.
    • A PT chart for 408A.
    • The printed out copy of this entire thread, and printed out copies of the following links.


    http://www.sporlan.com/10-143.pdf

    http://www.sporlan.com/10-11.pdf

    http://www.sporlan.com/10-135.pdf


    Now, if that Hot gas solenoid in the last post (Remember the Hot gas solenoid?? Did I ever tell you to open it's isolation valve? ) was causing the suction pressure to rise, then it must be serviced. Hopefully it's a Sporlan valve, as they're easy to service.

    I'll help you with that, if need be, once you tell me what model number it is, whether it's an actual three way valve, or a combination of solenoids opening and closing to get hot gas.



    MASTER,I will finally go buy the printer I `ve been neglecting.As far as those pdf files;I hate them.in the past I downloaded whatever I had to, still can not open one of them.
    also if all the oil I put before does not come out what then.I couldn`t open one of the valves` cap it was leaking too strong so I have to change a valve anyway.And I think my boss would not bother with cleaning the strainers and the sight glass he will have me replace them all.hot gas valve I will definately make sure wheather its leaking or not.its been two weeks we didn`t get a call from this one.this costumer worships me.he thinks I know what I am doing!
    any comment about the head pressure being 265-270 psi?water outlet 83*F.I don`t believe there`s overcharge..and if I replace the TXVs what if I don`t use balanced port?would the 270psi head pressure give trouble?One more detail I forgot to mention;3 of the TXVs are 1.5 ton one of them turned out to be 2.5 ton...
    thanks for your time and info.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    The pdfs are easy.

    Right click on them, then choose "Save target as", and put it in your "my documents" folder, or someplace else that you can find them. They open easier there than over the 'net.

    Make sure you have adobe aacrobat reader version 6.

    Sporlan used to have "winzip" files. Maybe those were the ones you were having trouble with???

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    The high head isn't ultra high. That's around 117 degrees condensing, which is higher than I like, but with a water cooled condenser, and the valve full open, then you get what you get until you feel like tearing into cleaning water cooled condensers...

    Cleaning the screens is MUCH easier than changing the valves out. If you pump these down, then that leaking one won't be a problem.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    182
    Altan, sorry for not getting back sooner but I've been out of touch for a few weeks (vacation and fishing). You have recieved allot of excellant advise here follow it and you will be fine.

    One question I still have is the oil you added to the compressor, where and how did you put it in? "IF" you added it through the suction it may never reach the crankcase if the crankcase is indeed pressurized. Clean the glass and watch the level in it when you shut the compressor off. If you added the oil directly into the crankcase then you should have raised the oil level. Like stated above, a gallon of oil is allot of oil.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,801
    Originally posted by basser
    Altan, sorry for not getting back sooner but I've been out of touch for a few weeks (vacation and fishing). You have recieved allot of excellant advise here follow it and you will be fine.

    One question I still have is the oil you added to the compressor, where and how did you put it in? "IF" you added it through the suction it may never reach the crankcase if the crankcase is indeed pressurized. Clean the glass and watch the level in it when you shut the compressor off. If you added the oil directly into the crankcase then you should have raised the oil level. Like stated above, a gallon of oil is allot of oil.
    yes indeed I added it through the suction and I thought I made a mistake but still couldn`t figure out how come it didn`t end up in the crankcase.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    182
    Altan, IF the crankcase is pressurized, that means the crankcase pressure is higher then the suction pressure (bad news).

    During normal operation, the oil returning to the compressor comes through the suction line and enters the motor end of the compressor. Now it flows across the motor through a check valve and into the crankcase. When the crankcase is at a higher pressure, the oil flow is reversed through the check valve and the valve will close, that is its function. As a result of the valve closing it prevents any further oil returning to the crankcase until it the valve reopens).

    When you added oil into the suction line, IF the crankcase was pressurized the oil could not enter into the crankcase because of the closed check valve. This oil will stay in the motor compartment until it is pumped out or the compressor shuts down. Once the compressor is cycled off the check valve will open and now you will see the two oil levels (motor end and crankcase)equalize.

  9. #22

    oil flow w/copeland semis

    This to Basser,
    Your explanation of oil flow/oil check valve on copeland compressors was well stated. It's scary to be standing beside a compressor and witness just how FAST an oil charge in the crankcase goes bye-bye. On a somewhat different note I've also seen an 800lb liquid receiver with a 600-700lb charge lose 75% of its liquid in less than 45 seconds with improperly set condenser fan settings. Low ambient but not on defrost. Little wonder so many compressors go south.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215

    Re: oil flow w/copeland semis

    Originally posted by healingair
    This to Basser,
    Your explanation of oil flow/oil check valve on copeland compressors was well stated. It's scary to be standing beside a compressor and witness just how FAST an oil charge in the crankcase goes bye-bye. On a somewhat different note I've also seen an 800lb liquid receiver with a 600-700lb charge lose 75% of its liquid in less than 45 seconds with improperly set condenser fan settings. Low ambient but not on defrost. Little wonder so many compressors go south.
    Healingair, my old signature line here was:

    Refrigerants don't kill compressors, technicians kill compressors with help of dirt, heat, and lack of knowledge.

    It's really very little onder why compressors fail, but what's even more fascinating are the amount of them improperly condemned...

  11. #24

    Re: oil flow w/copeland semis

    Originally posted by healingair
    I've also seen an 800lb liquid receiver with a 600-700lb charge lose 75% of its liquid in less than 45 seconds
    I've seen 1000# receivers lose 1500# of charge! AZ-50 at that. (not meant as a "my d1ck is bigger than yours" comment)

    Tech sent to r/r pressure control on compressor on a rack of 6 in April. In July evap condenser blows fuse. All comps shut off on high head except for this one, which blew the relief on receiver. Turns out the "tech" hooked the low control to the head and the high control to the crankcase. Swears he tested it.

    Same tech hooked up a cfm control as head control on another comp. Says comp was running when he left. Control was set for 350# so I doubt it came on for him. Luckily it was caught in a p.m.

    Same tech also hooked up the Demand Cooling sensor to the crankcase on another rack. He's still with us.




  12. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    east kansas
    Posts
    8,035
    Holely refer crap. I glad you didn't dilute my thread with this nonsence.

    I'll have to reread this and print it myself when it's not 12am. Looks like good information.

    What was my thread about anyway?

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215

    Re: Re: oil flow w/copeland semis

    Originally posted by jerrycoolsaz
    He's still with us.
    Sure, he sells lots of parts.

    And generates more service ork.

    And has pictures of your service manager in a chicken suit with the ass cut out.

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