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Thread: new mechanic

  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,176
    I don't know what TSSA is Lowtemp.I have come to realize though that even after a combined 20 years in 2 trades that you will never stop learning.Don't be afraid to ever ask questions.I still call sometimes to get a second opinion or if I am unsure of something, You just can't be cocky or it will bite ya in the ass.I would definately grab some books and at the least read and learn the refrigeration cycle inside and out and learn electrical.It is the Number 1 killer in our trade.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    607
    TSSA stands for technical standards and safety authority and they pretty much police the HVAC trade here in ontario canada.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Kenilworth New Jersey
    Posts
    230
    538 views in 3 days. Give the people what they want!

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    970
    Originally posted by lowtemp
    TSSA stands for technical standards and safety authority and they pretty much police the HVAC trade here in ontario canada.
    Boiler cops ehh???...you'll never catch me...you coppers..

    [Edited by sonc on 08-09-2004 at 07:53 PM]
    I work with the Chiller Whisperer...

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    20
    You know, the only thing I do know,is that I dont know ****..Thanks to all who replied to this lame thread.Esp Paul in Pa. and Lusker.. you guys are right on.I look forward to gleaning more info from the vets here in the future.Lusker , that link to the other breakout tech was hilarious..please have patience with us newbees!!!Thanx HVAC TALK

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    175
    O.K. all you book learned, certified, certifiable veterans of this highly technical, cuting edge tenchnological feild...there is something to be said about OJT!! I've been in the feild for about 13 years now. The company I started with (and still work for part time) consisted of the owner, a parttimer who was a firefighter, and me. The firefighter took me to a couple of installs and a month later, in a pinch, the boss sent me on my own in my own personal truck. He reimbursed me for my gas and gave me the necessary tools for the job that day. A year later, after watching every move the boss made and asking a billion questions, I was doing simple service calls and asking lots of questions still. Any time our product line offered a class, I went. I learned fast and retained all. But, I am an exception to the rule. I now have my State's stamp of approval in the form of a license and am in charge of an HVAC maintanence department.

    Over the years I've trained many installers...some are still installing and can't figure out how to read a set of manifold gauges with me pointing at the numbers and telling them what they mean. Some found greener pastures elsewhere, some are in prison, some should be in prison or dead. Some came directly out of trade school and I had to undo what the trade school did. Like teaching them how to wire a condenser fan motor...isn't that first week fundamentals? Anyway, my point is, training depends on the person. I happen to be the type of person who does good both in the classroom and in the field. But there are many out there who totally rock in the field but couldn't read a book to save their life. Does that make them any less a good tech or mechanic if they have the fundamentals down, regardless of how the fundamentals got there?

    Don't get me wrong, I am getting as much book learning as I can now, now that I know the "how" and "what" of the trade...I'm learning the "why" of things. This may be backwards learning, but it is making me a better tech every day.

    So Scrapper, if you want to be a tech, ask a ton of questions and pay close attention to everything you do. There is a reason you install the way you were told to install...someday you will understand why, until then, keep on learning how!

    Sorry this post was so long. I'm very good at what I do and know I still have a lot to learn...but I haven't stopped learning which sets me apart from some of my counterparts!
    Def. of insanity: doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results!!

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    956
    SONC Where in GTA are you?

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    970
    Hi operator,
    Haven't updated my profile in awhile. I used to work for an engineering company in Mississauga (Royal Windsor), but I packed it in about 6 months ago. Now with another union shop in St. Catharines, but still run Toronto 2 or 3 days a week. You a downtown Vet?

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