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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,909
    The saga continues. The A/C is cooling my new home but I can only get the temp down to 75 degrees on a 100 degree Texas day. I really appreciate it if you could help me answer some of my concerns below:
    Sounds pretty good to me.

    I doubt you need more cooling - might want to ensure that the ductwork is sealed/insulated, refrigerant charge is correct, and possibly possibly look into topping off the attic insulation. (Not sure what minimum code is there, but it would be wise to have R40-R-50)

    "Green home" means nothing.
    General public's attitude towards our energy predicament: "I reject the reality of finite resource depletion and substitute it with my own; energy is infinite, we just need an alternative storage medium to run the cars on. The economy can grow indefinitely - we just need to "green" everything! Technology is energy! Peak what?"

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    236
    18-20 degree split on a 95 degree day with 50% humidity (design temp). The hotter and/or more humid it is outside, the lower that split temperature will get.

    Do you have a copy of the heat load calculations that were done? I would be very interested to see them. It sounds like your systems may be undersized, but I'd need to see the load details before making a definitive statement.

    What's the indoor humidity like? 75 degrees @ 60%+ humidity would feel very sticky and warm.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405
    Quote Originally Posted by TxTurbo View Post
    18-20 degree split on a 95 degree day with 50% humidity (design temp). The hotter and/or more humid it is outside, the lower that split temperature will get.

    Do you have a copy of the heat load calculations that were done? I would be very interested to see them. It sounds like your systems may be undersized, but I'd need to see the load details before making a definitive statement.

    What's the indoor humidity like? 75 degrees @ 60%+ humidity would feel very sticky and warm.

    Good points but I doubt a heat load was ever done on his home. He came on here months ago asking for sizing per sq. ft., didn't get the answer he wanted, and left.

    If that is truly the case then..well.....

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,753
    Quote Originally Posted by SANDMAN_SATX View Post
    The saga continues. The A/C is cooling my new home but I can only get the temp down to 75 degrees on a 100 degree Texas day. I really appreciate it if you could help me answer some of my concerns below:

    How cold should the air be coming out of the vents if the temperature at the intake is 77 degrees? I measured he air from a vent and it read 66 degrees which i thought was too warm. I seem to recall that 18 degrees cooler than the intake is what it should read.

    How cool should the attic temperature be compared to the outside/inside of the home? The home is a green home so i have radiant barrier.

    The upstairs does not have any returns in any of the room (bedroom and theater/game room) and i thought this was odd. Should I be concerned?

    The home is a two story home and my 4 ton unit cools the downstairs while the 2.5 ton cools the upstairs. This has me worried since I thought having a bigger unit cooling the upstairs would make sense since heat rises (tall ceilings). The sq footage is comparable between upstairs and downstairs.

    Thanks in advance!
    So what indoor design temp was used when they did the load calc?

    What was the heat gain the load calc said the second floor has?

    When you say the first and second floor are of comparable size. Do you mean each floors sq ft of space. Or each floors sq ft to ton ration.
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  5. #18
    Attached are the load calcs for upstairs and downstairs.
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  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,753
    By the load calcs. Your home is 3400 sq ft.
    Your first floor is 376 sq ft larger. And apparently, has much higher ceilings then your second floor. So it should have a larger unit then your second floor.

    According to the load calc. Your A/C was only sized to be able to maintain 75 inside when its 100 outside.
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  7. #20
    I just found out that the builder used a plan almost identical to mine to perform the load calc. All of the rooms are virtually the same but my house is basically 93 sqft larger that the plan they used for the load calc. The extra room is in the gameroom and down stairs master bath.

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