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Thread: chiller work ?

  1. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Metro ATL
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    454
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptJackSparrow View Post
    Forget that! I want the 10 ton rtu. all i need is a 5/16 nut driver, fluke meter and a set of gauges and i will have it running. No rigging, chain falls, grinder box, machinists box, tool box, trollys........................................... .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .......... oh my back hurts, I got to stop!
    But you still have to haul that stuff up a ladder, freeze in the winter, fry in the summer and get wet when it rains.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
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    2,609
    Quote Originally Posted by jemawalton View Post
    But you still have to haul that stuff up a ladder, freeze in the winter, fry in the summer and get wet when it rains.
    Not if you only work on package watercooled a/c's less than 10 tons that have once-thru condensers on citywater in single story buildings............

  3. #29
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Pennsylvania
    Posts
    435
    Quote Originally Posted by klove View Post
    Not if you only work on package watercooled a/c's less than 10 tons that have once-thru condensers on citywater in single story buildings............
    Or water source heatpumps that always end up being right smack dab above someones cubicle!

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,314
    I spent my apprenticeship and probably the next eight years around machines of seven hundred tons and up to twenty eight hundred. used to be good work. just punching the tubes on the larger machines took weeks on end between pulling the heads, setting up the scaffolding etc. nice warm work in january. radio, rubber boots and a goodway. for the last seven been doing my own thing. we do a lot of start up of "newfangled" equipment. Air handler with fanwall and redundant drives, specialy energy recovery/makeup air units like munters, deschamps, venmar, governair etc. ie got thirty plus year guys who make comments to me like "i bee ndoing this shi* since 1982 and everything i thought i knew is changing", keeps them liking the work. its challenging. automation, bacnet integration, makes it even more fun. chillers in our local market have become a low margin activity as everyone thinks they are a chiller company. maintenance costs have gone down down down in that arena. its not like it used to be. The local jork office sells "overhauls" of machines, which dont even encompass the original scope of "winter work". an overhaul to thme is tube cleaning, oil sample, oil filter, and wipe down the machine. going into a starter is extra in many cases, and meggers seem to be like the lock ness monster....guys have heard of them but dont own them. unless they have a savvy client its like a drive by maintenance until the crasp hits the fan.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Parts Unknown
    Posts
    81
    I beleive if you are a HVAC nerd like I am it takes 10 years to become a good mechanic, but a good mechanic gets ***** slapped by certian things some days and we become better for it. I like to take a package or split sytem service call after performing a major overhaul just to get a diversified portfolio to my record. The more you know the better you become and the more valuable you are to the person or company you work for.. I have been blessed to be able to work with two very experiance mechanics that know a very great deal about a various machines if you could combine them you could have a super mechanic with over 60 years of experiance. These are people that you search for and deal with some of thier groucyness at times but in the end it is worth it..

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    81
    Quote Originally Posted by newbe0507 View Post
    it seems that chiller work is a alot more complicated than your typical rtu split a/c work , the controllers logic and programming is definitely more sophsticated, i've been studing IOM's, you have rerfrig. economizers, interstage cooling, external olil pumps, obviously bigger compressors and such, oil seperator, the safety protocals are enormous and the centrfical's well it's a machine i've only seen a hand full of times, is chiller guys considered the best of the best and the work as well, can you make top dollar doing the other stuff, i've heard it's alot of rigging involved, so what do the chiller mechanic's think, if i guy who's been in the trade awhile how long would it take to be proficient with the work ?
    Its not all about chillers, play it smart, learn all aspects of hvac especially chw and hw , in my experience you will only earn a few dollars more than the guy doing split work, but will have have a lot more responsibility. Keep me posted I will help u when I can if opportunity presents for yourself

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    349
    Quote Originally Posted by newbe0507 View Post
    it seems that chiller work is a alot more complicated than your typical rtu split a/c work , the controllers logic and programming is definitely more sophsticated, i've been studing IOM's, you have rerfrig. economizers, interstage cooling, external olil pumps, obviously bigger compressors and such, oil seperator, the safety protocals are enormous and the centrfical's well it's a machine i've only seen a hand full of times, is chiller guys considered the best of the best and the work as well, can you make top dollar doing the other stuff, i've heard it's alot of rigging involved, so what do the chiller mechanic's think, if i guy who's been in the trade awhile how long would it take to be proficient with the work ?
    It seems that a lot of upcoming mechanics eventually aspire to get into the chiller game. Some make it, some don't, some never get the chance. For me it was something I wanted to do. If I had to do it again I wouldn't change much.
    If you have the opportunity to get in the game, go for it. You will learn things, you will be challenged, you will be frightened at times, and you will be rewarded if you get in with the right bunch. And if you're good you will be wanted.
    Learn all you can, get the best training you can, don't buy cheap tools, build a library. If you are lucky you can find yourself a mentor who will help you along your way.
    As far as the time it takes to get up to speed it all depends on your circumstances. A lot of it will fall back on you, how motivated you are, your attitude, how quick you can learn. Some of it will depend on who you work for and what they throw at you, the training they can give you, who they have working for them that can expose you to things you'll need to learn.
    If a fella had the basics down, refrigeration cycle, electrical, good mechanical aptitude, and above all a good attitude, and was partnered with the right person or people, he/she could be the start of a good chiller mechanic in 3-5 years.
    Good luck with it.
    Superheat, that must be REALLY hot.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
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    13,817
    only once a week???????????????

    what am i doing wrong??????????



    Quote Originally Posted by klove View Post
    Depends on what you consider proficient. I'm going on 35 years at it, and I've gotten to the point that my week just ain't complete unless at least once in that time period it feels like somebody took my brain out, turned it around, and left the dumb part in the front.........
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
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    13,817
    if your question is??

    do chiller mechanics make more???????????

    I would say NO

    if you are a great controls guy great pay

    if you are a great boiler guy

    if you are a great rooftop guy great payy

    by the way, nothing more advanced that a modern large ton rtu!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    i would guess? if you were a great residential guy you would get great pay???????

    as a matter of fact i am sure of it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  10. #36
    Diversity is key in this industry, the more you know the more you are worth to employers

  11. #37
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Western Wa
    Posts
    1,754
    I started out as a process control guy and an electrician, and in commercial HVAC before I got to where "they call me the chillerguy". Had some of the finest ever in the business to learn from, but I darn sure don't know it all. And I still have customers who don't want anybody else workin' on their small stuff, too. And I still enjoy seeing the reaction when a CV7E comes down with a bit of colic and the new guy jumps about ten feet. I was that new guy once, and haven't ever forgotten it. There's just somethin' about that happy sound of an old double ender running with a nice load. But I also like these Turbocor units where you have to put you hand on the piping to see if it's running.

    Flinstones to Star Wars in my career and about 10 more to go.
    God Bless the USA

  12. #38
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    Jan 2009
    Location
    Not in Iran
    Posts
    992
    i started in a trade school., then went and earned only 8 bucks an hour for a package unit company., under mobile homes all the time., sucked., then went to split systems., then commercial., then worked for mcquay and disney., started to c the large stuff., i like it., come on we all know there is more $$ in chiller work if ur good., anyways i also do some refrigeration for a few restruants., i like the chiller work because there is more thinking .,
    no signature blast'em man blast'em
    !!!KILL THE TERRORIST!!!

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,817





    Quote Originally Posted by fishlips View Post
    Diversity is key in this industry, the more you know the more you are worth to employers
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

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