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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Nashville TN.
    Posts
    44
    I havenít heard anyone address the lint from the clothes dryer or moisture from the washer? I wanted to move them to garage but it is too far. I plan on putting the washer and dryer in a small room and want to have some way to vent the room after the washer or dryer starts. Does anyone have a ideal how?
    You need to explain it so I can understand it. Thanks for any input.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,646
    Ducting the drier to the outside solves the problem. A drier moves 100 cfm out of the room and is operated at the same time you are washing clothes. More than that is over-kill.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,967
    Teddy bear has the right idea. Also, try not to blow the drier exhaust on the outside part of the air conditioner. The lint realy gums things up.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Nashville TN.
    Posts
    44
    I donít know how to ask this question. The house Iím getting ready to build will be very tight.
    All the duct work will be in the living space run below the sheetrock ceiling.
    I was told to run the system with positive pressure.
    So here is the problem.
    How do I address the vents for the
    1 stove hood
    2 bathroom vents
    Should these have some control to not let them leak air or is this just crazy and I just need to hook up fans on timers? Thanks for the help. Iím trying to get a game plan.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,646
    Originally posted by ac4me
    I donít know how to ask this question. The house Iím getting ready to build will be very tight.
    All the duct work will be in the living space run below the sheetrock ceiling.
    I was told to run the system with positive pressure.
    So here is the problem.
    How do I address the vents for the
    1 stove hood
    2 bathroom vents
    Should these have some control to not let them leak air or is this just crazy and I just need to hook up fans on timers? Thanks for the help. Iím trying to get a game plan.
    "positive pressure" suggest make-up air to avoid the negative pressure caused by exhaust devices. If you are in arrid climate, make-up air systems are available. They mix outside air with house air, filter and introduce the clean fresh, filtered, air into the home through the a/c or seperate ducts. An example is Filter-vent.
    http://www.thermastor.com/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=207

    For green grass climates suggest a ventilating dehumidifier which has the added feature of being able to control the indoor relative humidity necessary to avoid mold and dust mites. It takes a minimum of 50 cfm of make-up air to positively pressurize a home to avoid mold growth in the wall cavities. Checking the outdoor dewpoints like today shows many green grass climate have higher humidity loads than Miami or Houston. http://www.weather.com/maps/maptype/...nts_large.html
    A week of wet cool weather causes high indoor relative humidity because the a/c is not operating enough to remove the moisture, 100 pints/day typically. +60%RH for several days, grows a little mold on the cool surfaces of the home. During future wet times, the mold expands a little more each time. After several years of the wet episodes, the mold becomes noticeable and panic follows. Fresh air ventilation with <50%RH dehumidification independent of a/c avoids the risk of mold growth, provides indoor air quality and more comfort.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Nashville TN.
    Posts
    44
    So if I use a ventilating dehumidifier it will force the humid air out the bathroom fan ducts?
    If that it true will I need to install the small fans?

    I just want to learn how to do this. Thanks teddy bear

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,646
    Originally posted by ac4me
    So if I use a ventilating dehumidifier it will force the humid air out the bathroom fan ducts?
    If that it true will I need to install the small fans?

    I just want to learn how to do this. Thanks teddy bear
    You need the exhaust fans for focusing the spot exhaust. The ventilating dehumidifier removes moisture from the fresh make-up air and the home when the %RH is above the desired %RH. When the exhaust fans are not operating, the excess dry air forced out through the leaks in the home.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Nashville TN.
    Posts
    44
    teddy bear


    The way Iím building, the master bath is on the other side of my mechanical room wall where I will have the air handler and also the APD UA-100V.
    Can I run the 8" indoor air line to this bathroom and put the wall control in the same bathroom?

    I didn't know if this would work to remove the air from the bathroom as the air get humid? Thanks

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,646
    Distributing the dry, fresh, filtered, air from the Ultra-Aire throughout the home and exhausting the humid air from the bathroom/fan is very effective. The undercut on the door and/or a small supply to the bathroom will be adequate. The slight negative pressure caused by the bathfan retains the moisture/ordors in the bath while being exhausted. A good 100 cfm bathfan with a walltimer switch to operate a 10-20 minutes after the shower is complete is ideal. The same principle applies to all the other exhaust devices in the home.

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