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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Urbandale IA. USA
    Posts
    4,902

    Posted 2-10-04

    Don't forget the five most important tools!
    eyes - look things over
    ears - listen to the equipment AND the customer
    nose - does it smell like there is a problem
    touch - what vibration is normal and what isn't
    BRAIN! - take your hat off and THINK about it.

    If you walk onto a job without any ONE of the above tools, you won't fix a thing.....
    Those who dance, appear insane to those who do not hear the music.
    Those who believe, appear ignorant to those who do not know God.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    2,096

    Re: re: Got any more?

    Originally posted by shophound
    3) Gather up as much data as possible (write it down!) during your analysis to back up your conclusion.

    4) Don't assume anything! Verify everything!

    5) When you get stumped, back down. Hardest thing to do in a time crunch but the time spent on a break is time saved when you return to the job and nail it.


    I like this answer the best.

  3. #16
    Knowing the history is a big help 75% of the time, using your senses before ya get the tools is also very important, overlooking obvious things occurs when you have a mindset that you know what is wrong before you investigate, start at the beginning, ie-if a condenser isn't running, still start inside and go over everything and work your way out to the condenser.......and my famous motto...keep your mouth shut and your eyes & ears open.
    Hey cockroach, don't bug me! ©

    www.AskTheDiceman.com

    www.TheColdConspiracy.com

    www.Pennwood-HVAC.Com

    Bring Em Home....

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    And, when you find the problem and the cause don't stop looking for more problems as the chances of at least one more problem is high.

    Plus, don't inform the customer of the problem until you are absolutely sure you know the problem and the cause. Even then, don't tell the customer what it is until you are sure you have found ALL the problems.



  5. #18
    Somebody should be elected as secretary for this list of troubleshooting tips.
    They should write them all down in and assemble them in an orderly check list.
    So each of us could print them out and them staple the list to our PT charts.

    This is getting goooooooooood!!!

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579
    Originally posted by R12rules
    Somebody should be elected as secretary for this list of troubleshooting tips.
    They should write them all down in and assemble them in an orderly check list.
    So each of us could print them out and them staple the list to our PT charts.

    This is getting goooooooooood!!!

    I cast my vote for Dice as secretary. He could comple them, put his name on it and submit to to Don for posting in the "For Your Interest" section.

    What do you say, Dice?


  7. #20
    If they have a big dog, be careful walking around in the yard.
    Hey cockroach, don't bug me! ©

    www.AskTheDiceman.com

    www.TheColdConspiracy.com

    www.Pennwood-HVAC.Com

    Bring Em Home....

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    1,303
    When you guys think this thread has gathered all the tips you want, and leaving it open any longer will just let it wander off topic, just let me know and I can just move it to the FYI section.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    2,131

    Laying of the Hands

    Good God Almighty!!!!!!
    I lay the hands over the condensers.....
    *No air...... Start at the wall ( Electrical, indoor unit off, etc. )
    *No heat a rising!!!.... Start at the System ( Indoor unit, Charge, etc )
    Go indoors:::
    Then I lay the hands on the supply!!!!! Oh demon get out !!!
    *No air flow ( filter, fan, etc )
    *No cold air ..( back to the system charge etc.. )
    Shasammmm.....75% of problems elinimated.
    I then place my hands over the customer and cast out the demon.
    Otherwise....
    I get the tools out and become an ordinary tech,
    systematically eliminating the obvious. Working diligently
    through each aspect of the system.

    But I like being a faith healer for 5 minutes


  10. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    2,131
    Originally posted by Boss
    When you guys think this thread has gathered all the tips you want, and leaving it open any longer will just let it wander off topic, just let me know and I can just move it to the FYI section.
    I've done it again....
    I'm doomed

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    1,042

    Re: Laying of the Hands

    Originally posted by actnowhvac
    Good God Almighty!!!!!!
    I like being a faith healer for 5 minutes

    Just don't forget to pass the collection plate when you have performed the miracle!

    Good to see you back, Actnow.
    Experience is what you have an hour after you need it.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,815
    When you are stumped start over(after a break) you usually overlooked something simple breaker fuse ect.
    Quote
    “Engineers like to solve problems. If there are no problems handily available, they will create their own." Scott Adams

    "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."
    Albert Einstein

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    I agree with R-12 Keep it simple stupid. Start at the beginning (power) and keep going until you find your problem.

    On every job you should record Suction pressure, liquid pressure, superheat, sub cooling, condenser split, evaporator split, voltage drop across all contactors, and relays, running, and non running voltage, and amperage.

    If you diagnosing a running unit, after you find what you think is the problem, take your splits again this will tell you if you really fixed it.

    If your stumped talk to someone else, another viewpoint can be enlightening. Like they say, the only stupid question is the one you don't ask.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

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