Capillary Tube
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 54

Thread: Capillary Tube

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,325

    Capillary Tube

    I checked out a under counter refrigerator/freezer for a friend today. The company that normally takes care of his stuff said it won't hold a charge and they can't find the leak.

    So I check it out. First I check the coils and notice a wiring mess behind the evap panel. So I clean it all up. I fire it up. It runs a 190 head, but suction drops down to 7psi. Then it slowly climbs and compressor shuts down on internal overload. I think it's a clogged cap tube. So I remove the gas on the low side and still have 150psi on the high.

    So I conclude it's a clogged cap tube. Now my question is I plan on replacing the cap tube and drier. I searched on the forums about this and saw the supco link for sizing. But it lists low temp or med temp. What if it's both? Also do I really need to replace the oil, like I read on some of the posts.

    Btw- It's a Enodis UC4148 refrigerator or freezer. And it has a Copeland AFE11C3E-1AA-301. The 301, I think means it's a non oem compressor?

    Any help for a novice when it comes to small refer?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    In the work truck
    Posts
    2,990
    I am no expert on this subject but will relay what was explained to be about replacing the oil. Im my experience (very limited) the 2 systems I had run into with restricted cap tubes was caused from the condensors being blocked and the oil turning to wax. I tried blowing out the tube and was informed on some tricks after I was done working on the machine so i did not try them.

    1. you can try and heat up the tube and free that wax build up.
    2. cut off the first couple inches of the tube and braze it back in as this is where the restriction most likely occurs ( of course assuming this is what caused your problem..

    So, replacing the oil, or compressor ( as it was recommended to me) is a not a bad idea to avoid future problems. Both times Quotes were given for the repairs the customer opted for a new unit..

    Like is said ASCJ I asked these questions about 2 refrigerators I worked on and these were the agreed responses I was given. Just wanted to pass this info on to you. Good luck.
    Gotta have the right tool for the job!

    Where is all the stuff MADE IN THE USA?

    "Thats what we do Troy. Incredible, Invisible, Imbelivable things. We are an Unseen, Unknown, Unvincible fraternity of craftsman.."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,325
    Quote Originally Posted by Pascone10 View Post
    I am no expert on this subject but will relay what was explained to be about replacing the oil. Im my experience (very limited) the 2 systems I had run into with restricted cap tubes was caused from the condensors being blocked and the oil turning to wax. I tried blowing out the tube and was informed on some tricks after I was done working on the machine so i did not try them.

    1. you can try and heat up the tube and free that wax build up.
    2. cut off the first couple inches of the tube and braze it back in as this is where the restriction most likely occurs ( of course assuming this is what caused your problem..

    So, replacing the oil, or compressor ( as it was recommended to me) is a not a bad idea to avoid future problems. Both times Quotes were given for the repairs the customer opted for a new unit..

    Like is said ASCJ I asked these questions about 2 refrigerators I worked on and these were the agreed responses I was given. Just wanted to pass this info on to you. Good luck.
    Thanks.

    This a small hermetic compressor. What's the best way to change the oil?

    I'm just not use to changing the oil without a oil port. Do you have to remove the compressor and try to dump it out through the suction service line?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    In the work truck
    Posts
    2,990
    Quote Originally Posted by ascj View Post
    Thanks.

    This a small hermetic compressor. What's the best way to change the oil?

    I'm just not use to changing the oil without a oil port. Do you have to remove the compressor and try to dump it out through the suction service line?
    Yuppppppp.
    Gotta have the right tool for the job!

    Where is all the stuff MADE IN THE USA?

    "Thats what we do Troy. Incredible, Invisible, Imbelivable things. We are an Unseen, Unknown, Unvincible fraternity of craftsman.."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Connectitaxed
    Posts
    2,644
    Quote Originally Posted by ascj View Post
    Thanks.

    This a small hermetic compressor. What's the best way to change the oil?

    I'm just not use to changing the oil without a oil port. Do you have to remove the compressor and try to dump it out through the suction service line?
    Use an oil pump if you need change the oil.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,325
    According to the tag it can be a refrigerator or a freezer........but my friend wants it to be a freezer. It's 404a.

    I know the cap tube is clogged and needs replacement. I just really wondering if the oil needs to be replaced.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,248
    Quote Originally Posted by ascj View Post
    According to the tag it can be a refrigerator or a freezer........but my friend wants it to be a freezer. It's 404a.

    I know the cap tube is clogged and needs replacement. I just really wondering if the oil needs to be replaced.
    According to the manufacturer's spec sheet it's a freezer, not a dual temp unit.

    If the capillary tube is plugged, yes you should always change the oil.

    These little peanut compressors are so small the only good way to drain them is to cut them loose and invert them...dumping the oil either through the suction port or the low side service tube.

    I like to cut the tubing rather than unsweat them. Drain the oil and measure how much you get. Then add the same amount of fresh POE.

    To add oil to a 3/8" tube is easy if you make up a few reducing couplings to form a small funnel. Then pour your measured amount...slowly.

    It's not that big a deal. It takes me no more than 30 minutes to change the oil in one of these little guys...and it's well worth it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by Pascone10 View Post
    I am no expert on this subject but

    1. you can try and heat up the tube and free that wax build up.
    2. cut off the first couple inches of the tube and braze it back in as this is where the restriction most is
    when i come across plugged cap tubes, most of the time i just replace the cap tube

    but when i see and smell stinky brown oil, i use the three step plan

    1.replace cap tube
    2.replace compressor
    3.install drier, evacuate,weigh in charge

    never use a cappillary tube shorter than the original length

    as for other statements on this thread about changing oil in a small compressor

    a customers money would be better spent on a new compressor

    as opposed to paying labor in order to change oil on an old compressor

    may be a little more costly for the customer to install a new compressor

    but it's a better plan for the customer, as well as the tech's callback percentage



    .

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,325
    Thanks for all the advise.

    So it's a new cap tube, drier, and oil.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,248
    Quote Originally Posted by ascj View Post
    Thanks for all the advise.

    So it's a new cap tube, drier, and oil.
    I posted Delfield's recommended cap tube size yesterday as .036" x 168". That seemed a bit long to me so I did some checking.

    Refrigeration Hardware Supply stocks that same for Delfield, so I assume it's not a misprint.

    Then I look into what JB Industries and Supco call for with a 1/3 HP low temp R404A compressor. Both list it as .031" x 30". Using JB's cap tube conversion
    chart to go from .031" to a .036" cap tube, they give a factor of 2...so 60" of .036".

    This is a good example of how cap tube selection can be quite confusing.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,325
    .
    Last edited by ascj; 05-09-2010 at 04:14 PM. Reason: Sorry double post

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,325
    The cap tube looks original. It feeds down to the evap. Then wraps around the suction line right after the coil 5 times. It then runs against the suction line to the back and into the drier. I can't imagine it's 168" long.

    My guess would be around 50-70" long.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,471
    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    I posted Delfield's recommended cap tube size yesterday as .036" x 168". That seemed a bit long to me so I did some checking.

    Refrigeration Hardware Supply stocks that same for Delfield, so I assume it's not a misprint.

    Then I look into what JB Industries and Supco call for with a 1/3 HP low temp R404A compressor. Both list it as .031" x 30". Using JB's cap tube conversion
    chart to go from .031" to a .036" cap tube, they give a factor of 2...so 60" of .036".

    This is a good example of how cap tube selection can be quite confusing.
    This one might have been restricted from the factory
    But more times than not I've found the factory size to be correct for the unit and the generic chart is N/G or too small
    Something is weird
    Does the unit have one cap tube or two ?
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event