Just a few questions
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Springfield,Mo
    Posts
    10
    I would like some advise from people in the trade. At present I work for a trucking company inside at a computer all day. I have always had an interest in this trade. My father has a hvac shop in Montana but wife wont move you know the drill.My question is this: Would it be better to go to a thechinal college we have one in the area that offers an AAs degree(2 yr) in refrigeration or just take the rses courses and get the training that way? I have a basic knowelege of refrigeration and learn fast but no shops in the area want to take on a trainee part time,I still have to work bills to pay and all.I only work Thur-Sat 0600-1800 so have time to do some training. Maybe with a few certificates from rses I coulg get them to take a chance any thoughts or advise please feel free

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    6

    Wink Hands on is always the best

    Take your courses enough to be certified and REMEMBER the important information, learn wiring, how to use guages, read your meter to the amps and readings and so much more..... Dont quit your day job for school, do an online trade school, or Night Classes.... In my opinion Hands on is always the best, after you learn the basics.... GOOD LUCK...... Michele

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Springfield,Mo
    Posts
    10
    Thanks for the advise I am a ham operator so the elec. theory is a breeze for me. I just need some hands on to get going or at least feel more comfortable.Most of my trouble shooting exp has been with boilers and they are not much in demand in Mo. Thanks again Richard

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,939
    ever think of dispatching techs instead of trucks,and in the evenings you could pick up on the hvac end of the business.that is one thing many shops lack is organized computer tracking of jobs to bill out,and keeping the service guys organized to get the most out of them in an 8 hour day.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Springfield,Mo
    Posts
    10
    I guess I never thought of that. I dispatch approx. 200 trucks a day in the five western states. Its all computerized with tracking and transponders on all trucks.50 service vans in a city should be a breeze??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,939

    Thumbs up

    the biggest item to companies is how quick they can bill out and get the chargable money from the techs invoices. your experience from the trucking is worth more to a company then ever you being a tech.each company has one or possibly even 2 dispatchers,knowing who to send on what call as to their level of experience is critcal,especially when companies are charging $125.00 hour to repair units when it is hot and the phones don't stop. good luck.......and the biggy coming soon to all companies is GPS and the techs are not happy with it.ask that of an interviewer if you go for a dispathing position,could make things interesting as in your relations with the service techs....being a new dispathcher with GPS just started!

    [Edited by maxster on 07-01-2004 at 07:55 PM]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Springfield,Mo
    Posts
    10
    Our drivers were not happy with gps when we first installed int in the trucks but now ask them and they wouldnt work for a company that doesnt provide it. Our productivity went up 40% within a year and in a business that operates on 2% profit margins that is a huge increase. This is getting a little of topic for the thread but I will keep your suggestions in mind when I decide what path to take thnx

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,939

    Thumbs up

    hvac techs are know for "skating" early in the PM or crashing into jobs late AM.one thing about this field there are no limits and the more you put into it(with the right company)the more the rewards both in satisfaction and $$$$$$$$ good luck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    6,047
    From a serviceman's point of view, having a dispatcher who knows your strengths as well as your weaknesses and will send you to jobs accoridngly is far more valuable than just the average dispatcher.

    Plus, if your a friendly sort with some good discipline .. you will go very far.
    Being freindly with the techs and getting to know them, spending time to get to know them ... this will amke a tremendous impact on the company who hires you!

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