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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hunts. Al.
    Posts
    360

    Lots of oil in system!!! York HP

    YORK HP B2CH090A25A. Removed the second stage compressor and LL dryer then on to blowing out the lines with nitro. I could tell this compressor had been changed out before (definitly not factory welds and new LL dryer) the owner of the store had been there for two years and has no idea when. While blowing out the lines there was a sh-t ton of oil coming out of the acumalator ( I have never seen this much come out before). I am wondering if all the oil in this system would have been the reason for the comp. valves to warp in the first place. I blew out all the oil i could get out but not sure how much could still be in there. I am worried about there still being enough oil in the accumalater to cause a similar problem. Should i have replaced the accumalator? What else could i have done?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,318
    Quote Originally Posted by snooked321 View Post
    YORK HP B2CH090A25A. Removed the second stage compressor and LL dryer then on to blowing out the lines with nitro. I could tell this compressor had been changed out before (definitly not factory welds and new LL dryer) the owner of the store had been there for two years and has no idea when. While blowing out the lines there was a sh-t ton of oil coming out of the acumalator ( I have never seen this much come out before). I am wondering if all the oil in this system would have been the reason for the comp. valves to warp in the first place. I blew out all the oil i could get out but not sure how much could still be in there. I am worried about there still being enough oil in the accumalater to cause a similar problem. Should i have replaced the accumalator? What else could i have done?
    Maybe drill small hole to drain then braze back up.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    217
    depending on the compressor there may be an oil port on the crankcase that you can remove excessive oil

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hunts. Al.
    Posts
    360
    No port on this compressor, but I'm confident i removed all the oil. The unit is now up and running, will go back and check up on it tomorow. Preciate the responses.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    mechanical room
    Posts
    1,259
    you can just cut out the accumalater and drain it

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hunts. Al.
    Posts
    360
    The crankcase heater was open, so as far as i can figure is the oil was washed out from liquid migration during heating. Of course this 2nd stage compressor had been replaced before and dont know how many before? When recovered not grossly overcharged, the owner did say it had been freezing up too! When i arrived he had already had some other company clean the coils. Valves were warped when i arrived. Maybe the last didnt blow out the system? Needless to say i will return to check it out soon. Peice of mind for me.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Auburn, AL, USA
    Posts
    597
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Maybe drill small hole to drain then braze back up.
    Brazing at any oil drain point can be a real "flame thrower" problem unless ALL of the oil is gone from area that the torch is being applied. Be careful.
    jt

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Auburn, AL, USA
    Posts
    597
    Look for ways and places that large amounts oil could be getting badly trapped in this system.

    After hours of appearing to run well in warmer weather, check the oil level in the compressor. Some oil sight glasses (usually on semi-hermetic ones) are read while running. Some others (usually hermetic ones) are read after shutdown. You need to know which kind of reading method you have this time.

    If you have an hermetic compressor and don't have an oil sight glass or a dip tube to check it, you can use one of those temp guns on the side of the compressor 5 or 10 minutes after shut down with the crankcase heaters disconnected. Just power down with the disconnect and do both. Then look for a distinct temp change at several places around the compressor at about the height most sight glasses are positioned.

    Excess oil can be removed from a compressor without a dip tube or tipping a cut out compressor.

    I am always looking to improve my ways so I hope for others to weigh in on my opinions. The more I learn, the more I know I don't know.
    Last edited by jtrouse; 05-08-2010 at 07:57 PM. Reason: typo
    jt

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Western Wa
    Posts
    1,838
    I remember one time with a Trane 5 ton split AC where there were no traps in a 60 foot vertical suction line. The installing company was replacing the second failed compressor, under warranty, and told by his boss, after I pointed it out, to install a P trap at every 20 feet of rise. I told the tech to take a bucket with him for the two compressors worth of oil that was down in the evaporator. "B.S." was his cocky arrogant reply.

    He spent about two hours cleaning up the oil off the floor when he cut into the suction to install the traps.
    God Bless our Veterans

    God Bless the USA

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