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Thread: HVAC School

  1. #1
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    Jan 2015
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    HVAC School

    Ladies and Gents,

    I have been in the industry for over a decade and I have not once serviced or installed an air conditioner. This is not by choice as I have always wanted to learn I have just never been given the opportunity as I am one heck of a salesman for our company, especially in the residential arena. I am jealous of our techs and their knowledge but I do know how I make our company the most money, through sales. I know plenty to sell, but not enough to service (I know the simple service stuff).

    My question is, do any of you recommend a great online HVAC school (would prefer accredited)? With having a family I cannot go to an actual school, but would like to study after the kids go to bed. I know many of you think "just be with your guys more and they can teach you" but as many of you know, if you are busy, it is hard to stop a tech and get him to teach you, plus you are trying to sell and make money yourself.

    I think the knowledge would help me become an even better salesman and would also help in the future should I ever want to own my own company.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Jul 2013
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    Richmond, VA
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    Assuming the company you work for is well regarded, you're working for the best school. No sense in wasting your money on online classes. Why not ride shotgun with a tech and see if you like it? Or have them show you a few things in the shop, like brazing and sheetmetal.

    There's nothing you're going to learn differently through an online class that you can't already do on your own. Pick up a textbook for a couple hundred dollars and read on your own.

  3. #3
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    May 2011
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    I don't know about an online school if you're thinking service. I spent 1/3 of my time in school doing hands on training. Purchase "Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Technology." That is the textbook my school used. Read it and when you don't understand something ask a tech or post a question here. Most importantly for troubleshooting is to know how a system operates when it's working as designed.

  4. #4
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    Jun 2004
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    EXIT 16W www.wmtandson.com
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    I LEARNED MOST OF MY KNOWLEDGE THRU BOOKS AND CLASSES.
    I regret not learning it in the field.
    when you rely on book smarts there is a level of insecurity that comes with it.
    I always feel better about doing something after I have seen it done by a professional,it leaves very little room for doubt
    Quote Originally Posted by CircusEnvy View Post
    Assuming the company you work for is well regarded, you're working for the best school. No sense in wasting your money on online classes. Why not ride shotgun with a tech and see if you like it? Or have them show you a few things in the shop, like brazing and sheetmetal.

    There's nothing you're going to learn differently through an online class that you can't already do on your own. Pick up a textbook for a couple hundred dollars and read on your own.
    DON"T mess with the US
    I thought I had been there and done That.
    ITS ALL ABOUT LEARNIN!
    I thought it would be better by now
    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands & his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands, his head & his heart is an artist."
    ~St. Francis of Assisi

  5. #5
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    May 2014
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    After being in the trade for thirty years, I can say without a doubt that electrical has to be the most difficult aspect of the trade for the vast majority of people entering this trade. I've even seen some "well seasoned" techs still have problems with the electrical portion of our trade.

    So that is where I would recommend you begin your studies. There are probably inexpensive electrical kits . . . In fact I just plugged these words into Google and got some pretty good results:

    Electrical learning kits

    Just play around with several of these kits. Use a meter to check things out. Here, try these words in Google and see what pops up:

    Electrical troubleshooting simulator

    When I was a kid my dad bought me all sorts of these types of kits; as many as I could handle. I just thought it was fun. I had no idea that I was actually learning (LOL). When I decided to get into this trade, I couldn't understand why others couldn't "see" how the electrical side of things worked.

    After you're done with the kits, maybe give them to your kids to play with, you never know . . .

  6. #6
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    Jan 2015
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    I would inform your shop you want to install a air conditioner, also as far as school,nothing beats on the job training,I was lucky enough to get accepted into a apprenticeship when I first started the money wasn't the greatest but the knowledge was priceless.since then I have owned my own business for 4 years,and now I am a service manager for a great company.
    Also if you have older guys 50 to 70 years old range in your shop always soak up what they teach you,I have learned a lot from the older crowd.

  7. #7
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    Jun 2002
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    south jersey
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    Here is what I did. I went to my local Vo Tech school that also offered night classes. I purchased the book they were learning from and read it front to back going over quite a few chapters. Then when the school started I enrolled in night courses. Two nights a week 3 semesters. About 6 months each. This was just a start but it will give you basic knowledge. Also some pretty good hands on at my school. You will not be a tech when you are done but it is night school so you will still be able to work days.
    You need to put the phone down and get back to work!

  8. #8
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    Aug 2014
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    chandler. arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    After being in the trade for thirty years, I can say without a doubt that electrical has to be the most difficult aspect of the trade for the vast majority of people entering this trade. I've even seen some "well seasoned" techs still have problems with the electrical portion of our trade.

    So that is where I would recommend you begin your studies. There are probably inexpensive electrical kits . . . In fact I just plugged these words into Google and got some pretty good results:

    Electrical learning kits

    Just play around with several of these kits. Use a meter to check things out. Here, try these words in Google and see what pops up:

    Electrical troubleshooting simulator

    When I was a kid my dad bought me all sorts of these types of kits; as many as I could handle. I just thought it was fun. I had no idea that I was actually learning (LOL). When I decided to get into this trade, I couldn't understand why others couldn't "see" how the electrical side of things worked.

    After you're done with the kits, maybe give them to your kids to play with, you never know . . .
    great idea! Im going to do this. I am also struggling with the electrical aspect of this trade. Mechanical is easy.

  9. #9
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    Dec 2007
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    dealemd
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    warning, your headed down a slippery slope! knowledge is addictive, more you get, more want,,,, what part of the country are you selling, have you talked to the boss about this

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