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  1. #1
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    Angry Is it worth getting into food service equipment?

    Hey guys. My buddy owens a few McDonald stores and is always telling me to get into the repair end of the kitchen equipment. I don't know the names of any of the equipment. They have the same equipment in all there store. The grills, fryers, shake machines. Does any one know if there's training DVDs for this type of equipment, and how difficult is is to work on. I'm not sure if I should invest my time and money in this type of work, but it's been on my mind for some time now. Something is telling me to check out. Thanks guys.

  2. #2
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    Confused

    [QUOTE=Vinpadalino;6569492]Hey guys. My buddy owens a few McDonald stores and is always telling me to get into the repair end of the kitchen equipment. I don't know the names of any of the equipment. They have the same equipment in all there store. The grills, fryers, shake machines. Does any one know if there's training DVDs for this type of equipment, and how difficult is is to work on. I'm not sure if I should invest my time and money in this type of work, but it's been on my mind for some time now. Something is telling me to check out. Thanks guys.

  3. #3
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    I cant delete the double post. Lovely!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinpadalino View Post
    Hey guys. My buddy owens a few McDonald stores and is always telling me to get into the repair end of the kitchen equipment. I don't know the names of any of the equipment. They have the same equipment in all there store. The grills, fryers, shake machines. Does any one know if there's training DVDs for this type of equipment, and how difficult is is to work on. I'm not sure if I should invest my time and money in this type of work, but it's been on my mind for some time now. Something is telling me to check out. Thanks guys.
    Why not ? The more you know the better. Especially if its for the same chain. I do both hot & cold so life is never boring. Some guys don't like the grease factor but never had a problem cleaning it off. I find it to be more electrically challenging troubleshooting wise. Start with his equipment and go to each manufactures web site for info and tech support. Or just go to HVAC-TALK
    HVACR-TALK

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Why not ? The more you know the better. Especially if its for the same chain. I do both hot & cold so life is never boring. Some guys don't like the grease factor but never had a problem cleaning it off. I find it to be more electrically challenging troubleshooting wise. Start with his equipment and go to each manufactures web site for info and tech support. Or just go to HVAC-TALK
    HVACR-TALK
    I agree. The more you know the better for your career. I've worked with all kinds of equipments in the food industry, Combi ovens, tilt skillets, blast chillers, etc. You have to be up for the challenge, but when you get use to it is very rewarding.

  6. #6
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    My friend said, get the education and you get the job. There is sick money involved it this type of specialty trade. It would be a little scary, and completely diffrent then residential plumbing and HVAC.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Why not ? The more you know the better. Especially if its for the same chain. I do both hot & cold so life is never boring. Some guys don't like the grease factor but never had a problem cleaning it off. I find it to be more electrically challenging troubleshooting wise. Start with his equipment and go to each manufactures web site for info and tech support. Or just go to HVAC-TALK
    HVACR-TALK
    It is the same chain. I guess the same equipment? Is that a good thing?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinpadalino View Post
    It is the same chain. I guess the same equipment? Is that a good thing?
    Definitely helps. Would make the task easier once you know the equipment. Where as i can go to a new costumer and find stuff i have never seen before. But like most stuff same basic concept just some different tweaks.

  9. #9
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    Those system either heat or cool their product, so you have some of the basics already.

    Most of the manufacturers have decent tech support on the phone. That makes things easier.

    McDonalds on the other hand is more high tech. Too much electronics to get started on their equipment.
    If the superheat ain't right it ain't charged right.

  10. #10
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    Downside is the equipment is being made cheaper and cheaper, its harder to work on reach inns etc especially with people stepping on you.
    Everything is constantly dirty and no one will appreciate what you do,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,they just want it fixed.
    You sure are cocky for a starving pilgrim.

  11. #11
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    I work for a company that services about 100 McDonalds stores. There is a pretty steep curve learning to work on equipment in these stores. Everything is custom made only for Mcdonalds. To get started you should get in touch with Your closest Frymaster and Garland distributor and try to get some product training. The names you need to familiarize yourself with will be Prince Castle, Pitco, Welbilt, Bunn, Bloomfield, Frymaster, Garland, Henny Penny, Automated Equipment, Franke, Ready Access, and if you dare Taylor. Tech support is usually very helpful with all these brands except for Taylor. Start with Learning the grills and fryers and get your hands into the rest as you go. We are very successful as a company because of our Mcdonalds work. They keep us very busy year round, havent worked less than 40 hours in like 10 years. Let me know if you need any Mcdonalds specific info.

    P.S. Try getting into the beverage side of things and you will then be able to be a one stop service company for everything in the store. Thats what these stores really like about our company. We will work on anything in the store.
    We do it nice cause we do it twice!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuudInstaller View Post
    I work for a company that services about 100 McDonalds stores. There is a pretty steep curve learning to work on equipment in these stores. Everything is custom made only for Mcdonalds. To get started you should get in touch with Your closest Frymaster and Garland distributor and try to get some product training. The names you need to familiarize yourself with will be Prince Castle, Pitco, Welbilt, Bunn, Bloomfield, Frymaster, Garland, Henny Penny, Automated Equipment, Franke, Ready Access, and if you dare Taylor. Tech support is usually very helpful with all these brands except for Taylor. Start with Learning the grills and fryers and get your hands into the rest as you go. We are very successful as a company because of our Mcdonalds work. They keep us very busy year round, havent worked less than 40 hours in like 10 years. Let me know if you need any Mcdonalds specific info.

    P.S. Try getting into the beverage side of things and you will then be able to be a one stop service company for everything in the store. Thats what these stores really like about our company. We will work on anything in the store.


    I agree. And I might add that food service work isn't for everyone. Lots of techs don't care for it.

  13. #13
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    Nov 2009
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    Food service equipment, or catering equipment as we call over here.

    Yes I would see about getting into it, most of the time its a steady number. I don't know about any training manuals or dvds though. I have been doing it for nearly 3 years now, but we do laundry machines aswell as catering equipment. I had the refrigeration experience from over 25 years ago whilst working in aircon, and the electromechanical experience on going for about the same time.


    When they advertised for the job they asked for a laundry engineer or someone with an electromechanical background, who was prepared to carryout repairs to catering equipment aswell. I was offerred the job the following day, and started it a month after winding my electrical contracting buisness down.

    They put me through a competent persons gas safety exam of which I covered some training over a ninety day period (minimum legal requirement over here), and a couple of days at the training centre and then spent the remainder of the week being assessed and sitting exams. Due to my previous work experience I had a lot of knowledge of gas fired equipment technology and safety, so it wasn't a big deal.

    You will probably find the catering side either a lot or a bit on the dirty side, compared with what you do now. It can vary with restaurant to restaurant, even in the same chain. Where I work we service Frankie and Benny's, Chiquitos, care homes, hotels, prisons, hospitals, and some small independant groups. Some days are good and some days are bad.

    Doing laundry work aswell as the catering side, makes the job more varied and interesting. Most of the fridge work gets subbed out to other companies, but you can find yourself doing work on uprights, reachins, walkins, and ice making equipment from time to time. Trouble is they won't kit out your van to do fridge work, so half of the time you just have to diagnose the problem and then other firms carry out the repair (daft or what).

    Most of the kit you will come across will be electrical and basically consist of a thermostat and elements, other kit may be steam ovens, warewashers, ice makers, and glycol refrigerated equipment. This is where the thinking starts. We can usually phone for technical support if we need to, and nobody will hold it against you if you need it.

    You will also probably find that there will be more early starts to get the job done, before the holyier than thou chef arrives to start preparing. You will learn how to handle them in due course.

    They can be so arrogant and head strong in some cases. Just bite your tongue, and go out and sit in your van for a short while, then come back and continue. Then take everything they say with a pinch of salt. remeber they're just arseholes that think they're something special, and don't forget that you are worth more than them and you're there bacause they can't fix the problem.

    If they annoy you that much and put in a complaint about you, then turn the tables against them. Go there for a meal, then complain that the meal isn't fit to be fed to a pig, and refuse to pay. Give them a taste of their own medicine. Anyway all the best with your descision, I hope you make the right choice.

    BTW whats wrong with what you do now?
    Martyn

    50 & 60 hz but 100's worse

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