Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 14 to 26 of 35

Thread: silver solder

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Somewhere in the Caribbean
    Posts
    221
    I work mostly in commercial refrigeration, I generally don't use anything except 15% silver. soft solder and hot gas defrost are not a good combination.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    Originally posted by cctrol
    I work mostly in commercial refrigeration, I generally don't use anything except 15% silver. soft solder and hot gas defrost are not a good combination.
    Good practice, but I'm here to tell you, if your HG defrosts are anywhere near 450 degrees F, you've got bigger problems than what solder to use.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Somewhere in the Caribbean
    Posts
    221
    Originally posted by condenseddave


    Good practice, but I'm here to tell you, if your HG defrosts are anywhere near 450 degrees F, you've got bigger problems than what solder to use.

    True, but expansion / contraction due to defrost temperature swings in piping, along with the pressure surges at defrost are reason enough for me to be wiser than I am frugal.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    For some reason hot gas does not like 45s either.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,460
    Piping for HG defrost is very susceptible to thermal expansion/contraction forces that result from the thermal changes going on.

    Just imagine a two-pipe HG system (like all market HG systems) where a 200 ft suction line at minus something degrees suddenly gets hit with one hundred and something degree hot gas. The pipes have to move and the stress is greatest at the joints. 45 Deg ells are inherently weak and any good supermarket specification will prohibit them. Stab-ins and reducing bushings are no-nos too. A&P back in the old days required the proper reducing fitting at every reduction and branch. When's the last time you saw a 1 5/8 x 1 3/8 x 7/8 tee used on a job?

    It's not uncommon to have a long run want to move 4-5 inches due to the thermal change. This is where I think the soft-solders like 95-5 and Sta-Brite lose it big time.......with the stress over time. Been there.....

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    I don't think I can ever remember seeing, or piping the required expansion loop.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,460
    Do you mean the loop in the Hussmann install books? No, I never saw or did one like that either. Usually you have a 90 in the line and you have to allow that joint to move by moving the clamps way back.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    I think it is in the Kysor/Warren book too.

    We never clamped anything but our main suction risers, and liquid lines coming in to the house.

    Our saddles were PVC gutter, cut in one foot pieces. We would drill two holes in the saddles to accept push pins. The kind in door car panels. The pins would straddle the unistrut so the saddle would not dislodge during expansion.

    You don't know how many times, I have seen a plumber get busted, for having a PVC vent in the return air. The Inspectors never said a word about our saddles. Go figure.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    Originally posted by icemeister
    When's the last time you saw a 1 5/8 x 1 3/8 x 7/8 tee used on a job?
    I've got a box of them, and a box of 1-3/8 x 1-1/8 x 5/8 in the shop. Covered in dust. Need any???

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    When I first started, we installed the expansion loops in a few stores. A few years later, I recall going on a call where one of them broke. That was the last I heard of them.

    45's and street 45's are banned by every single chain that I've ever worked for. They are not just banned in refrigeration, but in the plumbing, and even the drains. (Including the walkins...)

  11. #24
    Originally posted by condenseddave
    45's and street 45's are banned by every single chain that I've ever worked for. They are not just banned in refrigeration, but in the plumbing, and even the drains. (Including the walkins...)
    Why?

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    290
    bump for a good thread .. at least the first part

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    San Jose California
    Posts
    217
    icalled haris and englehard.... staybrite 8 is a stronger joint because it doesnt weaken the joint due to heat.. flame on 15% silpos etc... it is what it is
    Our fate is ours alone to decide as long as we remain armed heavily enough to dictate it.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event