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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    phoenix, arizona
    Posts
    1,133
    I am in Phoenix, Arizona. Heat pump is ideally suited for desert climate. If you opted for replacement. go with a heat pump.
    That said, if this is my own property, I would replace the compressor only. Flush out the line set, add a bottle of acid neutralizer, add liquid line and suction line filter/dryer.
    Decide what you want, decide what you are willing to exchange for it. Establish your priorities and go to work." H.L. Hunt

    "In order that people may be happy in their work, these three things are needed: They must be fit for it. They must not do too much of it. And they must have a sense of success in it." John uskin

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    192
    Quote Originally Posted by big sky hvac View Post
    The tech came up with those repairs because they are necessary for the job. Anytime you open a refrigeration system to atmosphere you should always replace/ install a liquid line drier. If it was a burnout, a suction line drier should also be installed and then removed or replaced in the near future. Just like with any motor replacement, the capacitor should be replaced whether it's good or not. The contactor could be pitted or arched, so replacement of that is good insurance of proper voltage to the new compressor. Anytime I replace a compressor, I use virgin refrigerant. I think it was a good tech that came out to diagnose the problem. On the flip side, with the unit being 10 years old, I would recommend replacement of the unit rather than replacing the compressor. I think a heat pump in Phoenix wouldn't be a bad idea.
    Of course if it needs those parts I would replace them as well, but in the post that started this thread, it was not clear if there was a compressor burn or not. Also, many new techs, especially in the Phoenix area are not paid a salary or an hourly wage, they get paid on commissions only! The likelyhood of getting parts replaced that didn't really need it is very high because unless the tech can make a sale, he isn't going to get paid for this service call!
    He's not going to make any money unless he can sell something to his customer.
    I wasn't trying to be rude and I'm not one of those who will sell parts to a customer that he does not need, but for some techs working on commissions, a license is a license to steal and I'm not well for it. After reading the original post that started this thread, I had concerns with what I was reading, that's all. If that was the TRUE situation, I don't disagree with you.
    I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue!

    The late and greatest ever, Senator Barry Goldwater

  3. #29

    compressor was burned out

    Yes. The compressor was the issue...bad windings. Tech suggested replacing the capacitor, contactor plate and filter to make sure it was a good job done.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    983
    Quote Originally Posted by mrbenz7 View Post
    Of course if it needs those parts I would replace them as well, but in the post that started this thread, it was not clear if there was a compressor burn or not. Also, many new techs, especially in the Phoenix area are not paid a salary or an hourly wage, they get paid on commissions only! The likelyhood of getting parts replaced that didn't really need it is very high because unless the tech can make a sale, he isn't going to get paid for this service call!
    He's not going to make any money unless he can sell something to his customer.
    I wasn't trying to be rude and I'm not one of those who will sell parts to a customer that he does not need, but for some techs working on commissions, a license is a license to steal and I'm not well for it. After reading the original post that started this thread, I had concerns with what I was reading, that's all. If that was the TRUE situation, I don't disagree with you.
    I can understand salesmen working off commission, but service techs?? Where I work, we get paid hourly through billable hours. If we aren't billing a customer, we're not getting paid. It must be pretty cutthroat down there. I couldn't work service and be paid only by commission, I'd find a different company to work for. I can understand how some people would be a little leary about having parts replaced if that's the only way a tech makes money. Unfortunately, some techs aren't really techs but are actually parts changers until they get it fixed. This tech that came out to the OP's house sounds like he knows what he's doing. Love your dog by the way.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    192
    Quote Originally Posted by acproblems View Post
    Yes. The compressor was the issue...bad windings. Tech suggested replacing the capacitor, contactor plate and filter to make sure it was a good job done.
    Then he did right by you. An Honest tech is good to find. I would also recommend if you fix this, to have the lines flushed out with Dry Nitrogen and solvent to remove what you can as far as impurities go. Replacing any questionable parts at this point is a really good idea since you have come this far. Even a Compressor run cap should be replaced with new if installing a new compressor.
    I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue!

    The late and greatest ever, Senator Barry Goldwater

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    983
    Quote Originally Posted by acproblems View Post
    Yes. The compressor was the issue...bad windings. Tech suggested replacing the capacitor, contactor plate and filter to make sure it was a good job done.
    I still would invest in a new unit rather than just the compressor. Sure the compressor is under warranty, but you're only going to get another year of warranty on the new compressor unless you can purchase an extended warranty it. You still have a 10 year old unit that could have the condenser fan motor go out next year or next month. I would not invest any more money into your old A/C IMO. A heat pump would probably work fine, but if I were in your position, I'd stick with the gas furnace, don't go electric. If I had the choice between natural gas or electric, I'd choose natural gas everytime. With a heat pump, the temp. rise is lower than a furnace, which means a longer recovery time. Gas heat is just better IMO. If you're planning on replacing the furnace, go with a 90% furnace(with variable speed blower) and a high efficiency A/C. You're going to use the A/C more months out of the year than the heat. I would invest more money into the A/C(higher SEER) to get a bigger return on your investment. You could still go with a heat pump(I'm not saying they're bad)I'm just saying don't trade your gas furnace in for an air handler with electric strips, it may cost you more in operating costs in the future vs. gas heat.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    192
    Quote Originally Posted by big sky hvac View Post
    I can understand salesmen working off commission, but service techs?? Where I work, we get paid hourly through billable hours. If we aren't billing a customer, we're not getting paid. It must be pretty cutthroat down there. I couldn't work service and be paid only by commission, I'd find a different company to work for. I can understand how some people would be a little leary about having parts replaced if that's the only way a tech makes money. Unfortunately, some techs aren't really techs but are actually parts changers until they get it fixed. This tech that came out to the OP's house sounds like he knows what he's doing. Love your dog by the way.
    Yeah, he's a pretty smart dog! Here in the valley it isn't uncommon for techs to be paid 25% on all service calls and 10% for new unit sales! Unfortunately some techs make really good money being a parts swapper who don't know how to use a PT chart! I don't know how many times I've gone out to a customers house and had to solve their problem by straightening out what the last tech did and some of these are pretty boneheaded mistakes.
    I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue!

    The late and greatest ever, Senator Barry Goldwater

  8. #34

    2 stage compressor

    what would the advantage of going with an ac unit that had a 2 stage compressor?

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    983
    Quote Originally Posted by acproblems View Post
    what would the advantage of going with an ac unit that had a 2 stage compressor?
    Better efficiency.

  10. #36
    in phoenix, we use the heat 3-4 months, and ac 6-8 months. Winter temp typically does not go below 40 and we keep the house around 70, and in the summer temps are typically 110 to 115 at the hottest part, and we keep the house around 80, would you suggest one is better than the other (heat pump vs ac)? Thank you.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Montana
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    983
    Quote Originally Posted by acproblems View Post
    in phoenix, we use the heat 3-4 months, and ac 6-8 months. Winter temp typically does not go below 40 and we keep the house around 70, and in the summer temps are typically 110 to 115 at the hottest part, and we keep the house around 80, would you suggest one is better than the other (heat pump vs ac)? Thank you.
    This is just my opinion, others may have a different opinion. Because generally natural gas is less expensive than electricity(for the time being), if it were me, I'd invest more money into a higher efficiency A/C, than concentrating on your heating bills. You can still use a heat pump with a gas furnace, but the life expectancy of the compressor is going to be lower than with an A/C. There is no magic formula to predict how long a compressor will last(too many variables), but the way I look at it is that it's going to run 6-8 months in cooling, then add the heating season and it's going to fail sooner than if it's only running during cooling season. The compressor is basically like the engine in a car, the more miles you put on it, the sooner you'll have to replace it.(the car before the engine more than likely) To me it seems you're going to spend more money on cooling than heating, so why not invest your money by upgrading to a higher SEER A/C, than investing in a heat pump. You can certainly invest in a higher SEER heat pump, but you're always going to pay more for a heat pump than a straight A/C unit. By just doing an A/C, you can spend the extra money you'd be putting toward a heat pump into a higher SEER A/C instead. Just a thought.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    192
    Quote Originally Posted by acproblems View Post
    in phoenix, we use the heat 3-4 months, and ac 6-8 months. Winter temp typically does not go below 40 and we keep the house around 70, and in the summer temps are typically 110 to 115 at the hottest part, and we keep the house around 80, would you suggest one is better than the other (heat pump vs ac)? Thank you.
    I would go with the most efficient AC you can get and also go with a gas furnace. You use the furnace 3 to 4 months out of the year? Really? Here in Phoenix? You must have lived here all your life or most of it! Gas is very efficient and worth the cost if you ask me. One thing if you can convince your Contractor, I'd go with a smaller furnace than your AC because we just don't need the same kind of heat here that we do with AC. A 42,000 BTUH Air Conditioner should do well with a 24,000 to 30,000 BTUH furnace.

    The reason for this is I see a lot of worn out heat exchangers because our climate is so mild in winter that heat exchangers never really get hot enough all the way through and short cycling is a common problem! Carbon build-up in the heat exchanger can lead to cracking and deterioration which could cause carbon monoxide leaks in your furnace that could wind up in your home making you sick or killing you!
    I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue!

    The late and greatest ever, Senator Barry Goldwater

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    1,070
    Quote Originally Posted by acproblems View Post
    what would the advantage of going with an ac unit that had a 2 stage compressor?
    A 2 stage condenser/air handler will provide better comfort (more even temperatures). It also provides better dehumidification, but that's not an issue for you. A 2 stage system won't give you any better efficiency. In fact, it may be a smidge worse because of heat losses in the ducts at the lower speed. But the comfort factor is significant, in my opinion. You will need a two stage air handler if you get a 2 stage condenser. If you decide to get a complete new system, you may be eligible for the tax credit. Without a new air handler/furnace, though, you won't be able to get the manufacturer's/AHRI certificate (manufacturers only test and certify their own complete systems).

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