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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,078
    Here's a pic of a stepladder that had just been brought in to the shop of a local landscaping company. The maintenance guy there was going to repair it.....yet again.



    Two of the legs had been "fixed" previously with wood, a third foot was broken, two of the fiberglass legs were cracked badly, the stays were loose and falling apart.....

    I was there to service their ice machine, so while waiting for a batch to dump I had a chance to talk to the maintenance mechanic about it. He had planned on patching it up, but after hearing my broken back story it got quickly cut up and tossed in the dumpster.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    182

    bad ladders

    ouch, a friend of mine just fell from a bad ladder. the extension guide broke. he fell 15 ft. to concrete. now,rt. heel crushed,left leg broken just below the knee joint, broken pelvis and broken left wrist.
    always check your ladders and other safety equipment. this guy might not ever work again.
    bad part is he's a single dad.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    2,652
    People don't think about it until it happens. I am one that hasn't fallen *yet* and I would've climbed that ladder.

    I know several cases that should make me think twice including our most senior tech that has been laid up for the last 5 months with a neck injury from a fall.

    It don't take a long fall either. A drywaller I knew when I was still in construction was working on a 6' step ladder, he was only about 4 steps up when he fell. The way he fell, his legs went forward, trapping his feet on the back side of the steps. With no chance of catching himself his head took the full force of the hit. He was in a deep comma for 3 days before being pronounced clinically dead.

    Another thing we all need to watch for is stairways. In the past two years there have been 2 people I know fall down stairwalls that hadn't had the stairs put in yet. One guy fell the standard 9 foot and broke his back. The other was a lady, the homeowner, that fell 11 feet due to thier high ceilings in the basement, she had a dislocated shoulder and suffered a concusion.

    Falling is nothing to be taken lightly. Gravity ALWAYS wins.
    There are 3 ways to do anything in life; Good, Fast, Slow: You can pick any 2.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hell Hole Swamp
    Posts
    4,180
    I guess the one I left leaning against the back of the van and backed over has to go, I have duct tape holding the splintered fiberglass together.....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
    Posts
    3,191
    Yes, destroy all questionable ladders.
    I got rearended one day on highway and lond ext ladder sticking out back of truck was rammed into the cab of truck through the bulkhead, between the seats.
    One of the feet was slightly bowed, but I wouldn't trust the thing not to fail at some place due to hidden damage from all that stress.
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,979
    I fell of an old wooden 8' while painting the house. Had just a little bit to go and heard the ladder "crack". Looked it over and saw nothing. Moved it to finish and one of the legs snapped off while I was about 6' up on it. Needless to say I was on my back with a trip to the hospital. Fortunatly I landed on grass and not concrete. Nothing really injured but my ego and sore for about a week. Chop those old ladders up before you get seriously injured.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    3,182

    Talking

    Originally posted by absrbrtek
    I fell of an old wooden 8' while painting the house. Had just a little bit to go and heard the ladder "crack". Looked it over and saw nothing. Moved it to finish and one of the legs snapped off while I was about 6' up on it. Needless to say I was on my back with a trip to the hospital. Fortunatly I landed on grass and not concrete. Nothing really injured but my ego and sore for about a week. Chop those old ladders up before you get seriously injured.

    Be sure to check the weight limitations next time, before climbing!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    11,855

    Talking

    While at a job site a roofing company was completing repairs. They used a 24' aluminum ladder to 22' while it ws on a wooden box to help take it to the top.

    I was 10 feet away when 6' 5" / 250 pound roofer hit the concrete next to my ladder that was tied off and on a lower part of the roof. He HAD 5 kids.

    Edited... happy?

    [Edited by lusker on 05-31-2004 at 09:21 PM]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    11,855

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Slacking off right now
    Posts
    7,546
    All this talk about bad ladders makes me think how lucky I was to fall 10 ft flat on my back and walk away with only sore back muscles for a day or two
    www.vetopropac.com - The best tool bags on the market - The offical tool bag of choice by techs everywhere

    Arguing with some people is like wrestling a pig - eventually you realise the pig actually enjoys it

    Gonads serve a useful purpose but are no substitute for brains

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,979
    Thats what the edit button is for below your message. To change screwups.
    Originally posted by lusker
    although I typed 24" you know I meant 24'


    sorry, and so are his kids

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    I used to work for a hvac co. in the 80s. I worked on commercial sheetmetal installs.
    There were a few instances where OSHA showed up and lead installers would quickly run over and say throw out those extension cords and that ladder, oh and that ladder too.
    Funny how unimportant our safety is until they thought they might get fined for not being safe. And catch hell from the owner.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Dallas,Texas
    Posts
    4,923
    About a year ago I had an 8' fiberglass ladder dump me. It had a soft spot in one leg that was not obvious.
    I was on the third step and when I fell, it broke both bones in my leg at the shin.

    I now have some nice titanium hardware in my leg.......
    and a new step ladder.

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