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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,149
    must have a refrigerant scale, a good one

    recovery bottles - I do with 3
    One's a working bottle - what goes in it comes right back out. Two's a garbage bottle - I keep filling it with one
    gas till I work another gas, then it goes in for reclaim.
    The third is a garbage bottle for that other gas. It becomes #2 when #2 goes in for reclaim.




  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    160
    Here's something to ponder. My town has 2300 restaurants. Each let say has 1 ice machine, 1 freezer, 1 walk-in, 2 reach-in, typically 5 to 20 boxes to keep cold. Each unit has maybe 10 items that usually break afters 5 years. so every 5yrs 50 gizmos will go bad in 1 restaurant. 50 divided by 12 months is around 4 things that go bad each month per restaurant. 2300 restaurants one problem per week is 2300 gizmo's per week just in restaurants. Not to mention liquor stores, grocery, rest homes, hotels, bars, topless joints, bakeries, bla bla bla bla bla. The numbers are staggering. The good thing is no one has time to take bids. The health deptment is your friend. So if you really think about it, it isn't really about refrigeration but MARKETING yourself. Putting the fish in the boat is easy, but finding the fish is the money making key to this business. In the summer I can get as many as 15 calls in one day just for me, myself and I. If you can do on AVERAGE 3-8 calls at $125 to $400 per call a day with minimal call backs you'll do soem serious bank. Be cheap on regualars and expensive on the one's that are not in your circle of good customers. Don't put all your focus on refrigeration but 5 to 10% on MARKETING..... It helps to be good at what you do also. You'll learn everyday. Some guys like 1 customer a day and take a 2 hour lunch, and drive 65. To each his own. You'll be frustrated eveyday with something or an other. Good luck and stick to it you'll get there piece by piece...

    [Edited by patchdf1354 on 05-26-2004 at 06:00 AM]

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    155

    Cool

    I knew a guy that graduated Apex. We hired him as a helper/apprentice. Believe it or not, this guy did not know how to attach his manifold set to an air conditioner! When I asked him how the h*ll he graduated without knowing how to take pressure readings, he shrugged his shoulders. He was a great guy but a bad tech. He ended up driving a UPS truck.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    4
    Wow, I do feel a little better now. I do infact know how to properly connect my gauges to a unit.
    Here's an update for those that even care...
    I went in to work yesterday and told the boss that I would require some tools to work on the units the have. Items like a scale, recovery tanks, micron gauges, etc. As I said before, my boss has no real knowledge of Refrigeration. My bosses reply to this was " You don't need some scale to top off my machines". "i've never seen anyone use a scale before". He proceeds to tell me that if I just "top off" the machines that everything will be fine. Then I ask him about the recovery tanks. He then tells me that they are not necessary either.
    I had no idea how to respond to this, other than telling him that I probably was not the right guy for this job. I really am not ready to be the only guy maintaining and fixing over 100 refrigerators in their 7 restaurants. I don't want to waste my or his time.
    So, I'm on to the next interview today. It's a differant type of job altogether. The interview is for a maintanance person For a group of apartment buildings. Each unit has a heat pump type system. The best part is that there will be somebody there to train me. Anyway, I certainly hope that this position will be a better fit for me.
    Thanks again for anyone who gave some helpful tips.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Ponchatoula, LA
    Posts
    84
    A few other tools to think about:

    Refrigerant Scale (you can't charge captubes without one)

    Cordless drill (The refrigeration gods just love sheet metal and #8 self-tappers. After you spend some time using a nut driver, you'll invest in a makita or dewalt)

    Multimeter (get one that tests compacitors, and might as well include flame rods as well, micro-amps)Fluke 16 or one of the fieldpieces, either the stick DMM or the all-in-one.

    Torch set (there are several manufacturers, and everyone has a favorite, turbo torch and uniweld are two, there are more)

    Swagging tools, flareing tools, tubing cutters (don't forget a mini, you'll know why one day), fin straightner, service valve wrenchs, schrader core removers.

    Look on the wall at your local parts house, alot of the tools are just waycool and you can do without them, but some of the specialty items come in handy. Buy a little at a time and build your arsenal. I hate to be elbow deep and need something and have to stop what I'm doing and head clear across town to get it.

    If ritchie makes it, you need it God I love yellowjacket.


  6. #19
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    42
    hey cobitech, since i only in resenditiol work, i found your answer intriging about 10,20,30, method but what about head temp whats the method for that , i like you answers, and the way discribethem.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    510
    Baltazar,

    To find the head pressure add the ambient(surrounding air temp) to 30°-35°.

    example: 90°ambient + 35° = 125°=275psig (R-22)Pressure temp chart. 200psig to 300psig range is what you are looking for.

    always check discharge line temperature for overheating (225° is the maximum temp that should be measured 6" from compressor.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    S.W. Ontario,Canada
    Posts
    622
    Originally posted by funzrlow
    Wow, I do feel a little better now. I do infact know how to properly connect my gauges to a unit.
    Here's an update for those that even care...
    I went in to work yesterday and told the boss that I would require some tools to work on the units the have. Items like a scale, recovery tanks, micron gauges, etc. As I said before, my boss has no real knowledge of Refrigeration. My bosses reply to this was " You don't need some scale to top off my machines". "i've never seen anyone use a scale before". He proceeds to tell me that if I just "top off" the machines that everything will be fine. Then I ask him about the recovery tanks. He then tells me that they are not necessary either.
    I had no idea how to respond to this, other than telling him that I probably was not the right guy for this job. I really am not ready to be the only guy maintaining and fixing over 100 refrigerators in their 7 restaurants. I don't want to waste my or his time.
    So, I'm on to the next interview today. It's a differant type of job altogether. The interview is for a maintanance person For a group of apartment buildings. Each unit has a heat pump type system. The best part is that there will be somebody there to train me. Anyway, I certainly hope that this position will be a better fit for me.
    Thanks again for anyone who gave some helpful tips.
    You are smart to take a walk now...sounds like they just want someone to top up your units. Keep us posted on your next adventure.
    If every a...... could do this,I wouldn't have a job...

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Camel City, NC
    Posts
    6,232

    fun

    The apt. job will be a better start for you. When your not working, read,read,read and read some more. Get literature out of equipment your working on and chew on it. Don't let some clown who is money hungry cause you to loose your EPA cert. or worse get fined. That is where you were headed with the resturant thing. Good Luck, this field takes a lifetime.
    Be safe not fast. body parts don't grow back

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