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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    4
    Please, I need some help. I just graduated from Apex Tech in the city. All throughout school, instructors told me how after school I would get some job as an apprentice and work under a mechanic who would show me the ropes. I felt comfort in this notion. I just got hired by a company of "restauranteurs" in the city. These guys own 8 restaraunts in Manhattan. They hired me to be their Refrigeration Technician. They offered me above and beyond what I ever expected to get just after school despite the fact that I told them that I really had minimal field experience.
    Here is my issue. I have never had any experience with Icemakers or walk-in type refrigerators. I have had very little experience with low-boys or any other type of commercial application for that matter.
    Today was my first day... The new Boss (not in the ref. field) tells me to go check pressures on the units to see if they are operating properly.
    I really have no idea what optimum pressures would be.
    I'm not even positive of what refrigerant is in these systems.
    Bottom line... if there is anyone with some type of helpful info that may keep me from getting fired from my first job out of school, it would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    174

    well if...

    ...your bass has no experience then he doesnt even know what he is looking for, secondly, if you check the temperature on the walk ins etc. and they are coolong correctly then theres no reason to touch them. If they have a perfect charge, they will not have such after you put gages on them

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    You mean in school, they did not ever teach you how to read a pressure temperature chart.

    Get one and learn to read it. Then keep your coil at least 10 degrees colder than your box.

    With schools like that, you would be better off if you just read this entire web site. Here, you can learn.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    4
    Thanx for the tips...keep 'em coming...please. I'm sorry, I didn't mean to make it sound like they didn't teach us how to use a P/T chart, they most definately did. Apex just simply did not give us adequate Shop time (i.e. hands on training).
    Thanx for any helpful info any of you may send my way.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    511
    funzrlow,

    Just remember the 10-20-30 method.
    10 for low temp.
    20 for medium temp.
    30 for High temp.

    just say that you are using 404-a for instance and you want a -10 box temp,subtract 10 from that and you will have a -20 evaporator coil.
    which is 16 Psig on your P.T. chart. get it...
    and it applies to most all refrigerant types.

    It's the way I remember to charge units and it works.,

  6. #6
    Contact me via my profile. I will give you my cell phone number which you can call during the day and I will walk you thru your adventure, step by step.

    If you visit my website, you will find my number there also. Simply phone me, if you wish.

  7. #7
    Get busy reading this site.

    Post questions OFTEN! Seriously!

    Read thru Tips & Tricks of The Trade. read it all!!!

    The go looking for more adivce.

    Read thru past stuff under Refrig & Ice Making. Go all the waaaayyyy back ... each and every page .... read the stuff that you believe will help you the most ... at first.


    What do you have for tools, a vehicle, test equipment, etc. ???

    Do yo have open accounts anywhere? Are they giving you a checking account to draw off of? A credit card maybe?


    Try and stay away from all plumbing work, especially any thing to do involving drains. Drain lines. Drain cleaning. Drain inspections. Drain pipes. Or "Fudge Packing".

    [Edited by R12rules on 05-24-2004 at 10:34 PM]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    186
    Most of us have been in that stage, whether we admit it or not is another story. If nothing is wrong write down the pressures and line temp on each unit note the superheat & subcool and when something happens you can go back to the previous reading and have an idea what is going on. Go back to your books and find that chart that has all the arrows on it and copy it and carry it with you. If you have a problem post all the info you can get on here and some of us will help, others will harass but pay no attention to them.
    Because chicks dig it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,149
    Oh my god, absolutely positively a tough road to hoe.
    You can do A/C and be half good, but reefers are picky as
    heck - and freezers have to be just right.

    You can figure the book stuff I reckon. PT charts and
    gases, but you better be asking some questions. There's
    just a ton of 'little' things you're gonna need.

    Best wishes to ya and do post often.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    4
    I just wanted to take a minute and tell you fellas that I really appreciate all of the replies. My second day (today) on the job was not as gut wrenching as the first day. I spent most of the day cleaning condenser coils and registers and all that good stuff.
    I went to one of the larger restaurants (quite possibly the largest that they own) and decided to take an inventory of all the refrigerators. HOLY JESUS! There are 31 refigerators, not including 4 ice makers. Not all the restaurants have this many, but none I've been to so far have less than 12. Most of the machines at the big place are Traulsens, there are also a few Randells.
    I spoke to one of my last instructors from school who told me my best bet was to go to ABCO in Long Island City and get as much info on the machines as possible.
    ...Also, I need to come up with a list of things that no Service tech can live without on the job. The job has relatively limited tools to supply me with since I am the first guy on the job. But they are willing to get me what I need. They have a vac pump and recovery pump, some new gauges, digital thermometer, some bottles of refrigerant (r404a r134a etc.) They don't have a recovery tank, so I'll have to get a few. I've got screwdrivers, nut drivers, pliers, a decent brush, and a wrench set. Can you guys think of anything else I might need?
    Again, let me Thank all of you in advance of your replies... your comments are REALLY appreciated.

    Well... on to day three, wish me luck.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    501
    Definately get a pipe clamp for your thermometer. It will make getting superheat and subcooling readings easy.

    The fluke clamp is good, but pricy.

    Don't forget a micron gauge as well.

    My infrared thermometer is great for box temps.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    458
    Originally posted by funzrlow
    HOLY JESUS! There are 31 refigerators, not including 4 ice makers. Not all the restaurants have this many, but none I've been to so far have less than 12.
    Boy are you in for a tret. 3 of us have 35 Mickie D's and can barely keep up with service calls let alone pm's on about 6-8 small boxes, WIC/WIFs and 6-8 RTUs, + ice amchines, then we have to do the other equipment(grills, fryers, etc. Best part is ......always learning. THat's cool.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    458
    That's for each store , of course.

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