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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3

    Confused

    I have an AC unit in my house, the air handler is in the attic. They ran the drain into the plumbing vent pipe. The unit has a trap and it appears to have proper pitch. My question is: Is this the correct way to run the drain? Or should it be run into the gutters outside

    [Edited by casman52 on 05-18-2004 at 09:15 PM]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Florida's space coast
    Posts
    2,538
    You have a condensing unit in your attic?

    Are you sure its not the air handler in the attic?

    I dont especially care for using vents pipes for drains, but I have seen it done that way with no problems.
    Check local building codes to see if that is acceptable in your area.
    We've been doing so much,for so long,with so little, that now we can do almost anything, with nothing at all.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    It is like tapping into a chimney with a flue pipe. The motion of the sewer gas is up and out. This is not my best choice but I have done it when there is no viable alternative.

    That is in fact an air handler in your attic. The condensing unit if the one out side.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3
    What are my choices to run the drain?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,242

    Drain into a vent riser?

    In most localities, running a condensate drain into a sewer vent riser is not allowed. If it's merely a storm drain riser, you're okay.
    If you have a heat-pump, come wintertime, your house is gonna smell like a sewer from vent gases being drawn into the air handler through the condensate drain line.
    If you can maintain proper pitch, running it to a gutter should work, provided the gutter contents don't block the condensate flow and cause your attic to flood.
    Probably the best method would be to run the drain line to the rear of your attic, behind the house, and drop a line from the attic to the ground. No sewer smell and fewer problems.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Chicago, N/W burbs
    Posts
    8,004
    A condensate pump is the answer. No pitch, no long drain line, no sewer line, no nuthin' just easy pumpin.
    R2B4BTU

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Waterford Michigan
    Posts
    2,668
    Where I'm from you can't use a closed plumbing system to drain condensate and the drain from the secondary drain pan (required) must drain to a conspicuous place.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3
    Where does the overflow from the evap coil enclosure go to? It is the higher of the two holes in the side of the enclosure (the lower one should be the main condensate drain). Does it go to the over flow pan below you unit? Is is plugged? Or does it do something else? Mine has a small run of piping that goes up, with a removable cap. I plan to change this because it seems as though the over feature has been defeated in this configuration. My older unit just had a stub pipe coming out and would drain to the overflow pan if the main line was blocked.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3
    ...........my previous post should read that the overFLOW feature has been defeated...............

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