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  1. #1
    I was talkin to this tech who told me some guy told him to stick a hose clamp and a bicycle patch on the coil leak of a meat case evaporator.

    I thought it was a joke. He told me he was serious. And that the very next morning, it had leaked down again.

    Then I shared the story with another guy and he told me it was standard proceedure to use a hose clamp and a piece of rubber while waiting for corperate approval prior to replacing something that cost thousands of dollars.

    Whats the truth?


    And .... are there "OTHER" trade secrets I need to know about?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Orange County CA
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    1,084
    whatever it takes

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    You don't have to wait for cororate approval on the hose clamp.

    Seriously, how much longer would it have taken to get a torch? Instead of a hose clamp.

    Remember any time you repair something in a way not in line with industry standards. Leaves you and your company open to lawsuits.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
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    10,325

    A hose clamp and a patch?.........

    I'm shocked but not surprised that you might hear that being done. If this guy's boss ordered him to do that I'd be a little more shocked. If the guy that ordered it done were the corporate head of store maintenance then...... well.......I'd be surprised that he didn't suggest J/B Weld.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Orange County CA
    Posts
    1,084
    I think maybe he's talking about an aluminum coil.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
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    4,578
    It is common practice to do what ever it takes to keep a market in business while quoting a new evaporator coil. Why did it leak? I have seen this practic demonstrated more that a few times and it does slow the leak alot.

  7. #7
    Originally posted by NedFlanders
    I think maybe he's talking about an aluminum coil.
    I am not positive, but I think it was copper. But it had been subjected to the bottom of the meat case and I am not sure about how clean it was down there. Acid wise.

    The reason for the "patch" rather than using the torch was, from what I've heard .. these coils leak and you fix a spot here and then they begin to leak over there.
    Like a cancer.

    Two weeks ago I had a FF line where the defrost element blew a nice big hole in the bottom pass of the coil. It gotr the torch. And to my knowledge, it has not developed another leak since.

    But I was told these coils in the meat cases develope a cancer to where they are not repairable once found leaking. Is this correct?



    Corperate does not have to give up aproval on a leak repair... just on a multi thousand dollar coil replacement job.


    And hey ... what's wrong with J/B weld?


  8. #8
    I have made such a repair. Hussmann cases had aluminum coils in them, and they are a ***** to solder. you need everything to be perfect, including the quality of the tube itself. If it was in a meat case, the oils etc from the meat drippins has probably penetrated the aluminum making it impossible to solder. Harris Co. makes a solder and flux that is great for aluminum coil repairs. Practice on beer cans. It is a great opportunity to drink beer. Do not use your oxy-accetelyne torch. mapp gas or small turbo torch only. there is no color change with aluminum. one minute it is there the next it is a puddle.

    Sometimes fear is a great motivator to come up with new solutions.
    Good Luck

  9. #9
    Originally posted by refer dude 2479
    there is no color change with aluminum. one minute it is there the next it is a puddle.
    Hahahaha, that has happened to me a few times.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Orange County CA
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    1,084
    Originally posted by refer dude 2479
    I have made such a repair. Hussmann cases had aluminum coils in them, and they are a ***** to solder. you need everything to be perfect, including the quality of the tube itself. If it was in a meat case, the oils etc from the meat drippins has probably penetrated the aluminum making it impossible to solder. Harris Co. makes a solder and flux that is great for aluminum coil repairs. Practice on beer cans. It is a great opportunity to drink beer. Do not use your oxy-accetelyne torch. mapp gas or small turbo torch only. there is no color change with aluminum. one minute it is there the next it is a puddle.

    Sometimes fear is a great motivator to come up with new solutions.
    Good Luck
    For just this reason , we don't repair aluminum coils unless it is a no brainer.

    As a matter of fact , Friday we replaced a Hussmann DM case evap. with a custom built coil made to specs. Copper this time. It came out good . This Safeway/Vons is a pile and it has a Hussmann TD to boot. The store gives me the willies.

    I scrapped the old coil .. and got 16$(oh yeah). I first cut a section out to practice on.
    I have a 50% success rate...a little too iffy for a field repair.

    I have an Hussmann RCA5 coil also on order (copper replacement) , should be next week sometime...not looking forward to this one though.



  11. #11
    The coil we are having to replace is in a Tyler case.

    Tyler sent out the first coil and it arrived "in two pieces".

    Is it better to order non OEM coils? Whom would you suggest?


    I dont have a problem with making coil repairs. I have been sucessful using the low temp solder kit. But my skill is best in epoxy repairs.

    I have a tremendous sucess rate. But my holes to patch have usually been small ones.


    I would imagine that with all the breakthroughs in chemistry today, we would have something we could simply clean the pipe, paint this stuff on, apply either some heat or a second chemical to for a reaction like a catalyst ...then it's ready to return to service.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    I never knew you could torch a hole on an aluminum coil shut. I wouldn't mind knowing how to do that. I never have had to once have to fix a leak on an aluminum coil, but it would be nice to know, depending on the situation I find myself in, that if I had to weld it up, I could.

  13. #13
    Johnstone sells an aluminum solder kit. It works.
    Get an old dirty oily greazey slimey aluminum coil somewhere, punch a tiny hole in it and make your attempt at reapiring it.

    Also try out the Devcon expoy kits.

    What I notice different about market work versus standard commercial refrigeration is the coils are all a big deal to gain access to.


    I changed out a FF line defrost element Friday ... heck .. we needed an engine hoist just to get the coil up far enough to get the old element in and out.

    (since neither of us thought to bring an enhine hoist with us, we simply used a crow bar and some very large tubing.)


    If I had gone to all the trouble of getting to the bottom side of a meat case evap coil, I would want to know that I know that what I just done .. wouldnt have to be done again for a very very long time!!!
    I guess that's one of the major reasons my boss simply sells them a new coil.


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