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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,334
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    Which one are you using? what are you pushing the wire through the cap tube with? I have seen on with a handle on it too.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    152
    Post Likes
    Sorry about any confusion, I use a Thermal Cap Check. This is a small hydraulic pump.
    First I hook it up and pump oil through cap tube to guarantee it is open. Next a piece of lead wire slightly smaller than the inner bore of the cap tube is inserted in the tube. The pump is reattached and oil is pumped through the cap tube again.This clears the bore as any rectriction should be routed out by oil passing around the wire when it is detained by a restriction. Like most equipment user experiences may vary mine have been good.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NW IL.
    Posts
    3,939
    Post Likes
    Here's some nice photos and info on the cap tube cleaner including a link to the user's manual.
    http://fierychill.com/cap-check-capi...gineering-1003
    Aircraft Mechanical Accessories Technician. The Air Force changed the job title to Air Craft Environmental Systems Technician. But I've decided I'll always be a Mech Acc.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    476
    Post Likes
    4000-5000 psi and no damage to cap tubes?
    ENJOY THE RIDE

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,331
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Peztoy View Post
    4000-5000 psi and no damage to cap tubes?
    Must be the pressure behind the wire. Good question how could a cap tube support 4000-5000 psi ?

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    4,870
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    Well I made one for about $20.00 It is about 80% effective. Bought a new grease gun and screwed an acces fitting where the hose used to go.
    Piece of flared 1/4 inch tube. Braze tube into the other end. Fill grease gun with oil, tighten flare on to the grease gun and pump. Then I usually
    put a flared filter dryer in the system just before the cap tube. Hope this helps.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by MechAcc View Post
    Saw an advert in a trade magazine about PVE Oil. Compatible with HFC refrigerants an no hydrolysis like POE. http://pag-idemitsu-usa.com/pve_benefits.htm
    Daikin uses PVE oil in their equipment specifically because it doesn't break down into acids. They also don't use filter driers.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Charleston, Wv.
    Posts
    1,869
    Post Likes
    If it's just a simple cap tube system, why spend the time and effort to attempt a cleaning? I could see it on a system that has tube soldered to suction lines, etc. but if you have to open the system anyway to "clean the tube", why not just replace it?

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,381
    Post Likes
    I agree, replace it. But on some idiot designs .. like a True GDM-49F where they decided to run the line set encapsulated in foam behind a cabinet that's permanent . . . I'd rather attempt a cleaning as opposed to running a line set kit. Accessibility on the evaps are horrible.

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    prov.r.i.
    Posts
    1,446
    Post Likes
    They make a mess,
    if at first you dont succeed,then skydiving is not for you

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Clovis,Calif. 93612
    Posts
    133
    Post Likes
    On a True GDM 49F just run the new cap tube inside the suction line. No need for a line set. Just cut the suction line at the compressor compartment then install a T fitting. Do the same up at the evaporator. Run your cap tube thru the T fitting up the suction line to the T fitting at the evaporator. Now weld everything up. You got a new cap tube inside the evaporator compartment

  12. #25
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    2,232
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by lytning View Post
    Well I made one for about $20.00 It is about 80% effective. Bought a new grease gun and screwed an acces fitting where the hose used to go.
    Piece of flared 1/4 inch tube. Braze tube into the other end. Fill grease gun with oil, tighten flare on to the grease gun and pump. Then I usually
    put a flared filter dryer in the system just before the cap tube. Hope this helps.
    Do you use any wire in the cap tubes, and does the oil leak out where the grease tube normally goes?

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    4,870
    Post Likes
    That isn't working as well with R134. Never used the wire. Have run cap inside of suction line.
    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post
    Do you use any wire in the cap tubes, and does the oil leak out where the grease tube normally goes?

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