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Thread: Split Condenser

  1. #1
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    Split Condenser

    The most common way E2 achieves split mode in an
    air-cooled condenser with single-speed fans is to lock OFF
    50% of the total number of fans.
    You may choose to lock
    OFF all odd-numbered fans, even-numbered fans, the first
    half of all fans, or the last half of all fans.
    Split mode can also be achieved by activating a valve
    that bypasses a portion of the tubing in the condenser manifold.
    The resulting decrease in surface area results in
    reduced cooling.
    From the E2 book

    anyone ever seen a split condenser just shut off half the fans? Ive only seen the split valve setup that reduces 50%. +lock out the fans on the half split side.
    Last edited by Phase Loss; 04-07-2010 at 02:47 AM.

  2. #2
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    I think you don't understand split condenser.

    when a condenser on a rack has been configured with valving to split it, as a strategy of keeping the head pressure from falling below set point in low ambient, )less effective surface area) the refrigerant is now being manipulated to not even discharge to the inactive side of the condenser. So, we can shut the fans off. There gonna just spin eating money, for nothing.

    In an e2 when you first program a condenser it is going to prompt you to choose a strategy for the fans. The choices made then determine yet other things. If you tell an e2 you got a split condenser, it already assumes that it's gonna need to actuate a valve to function the rack into split. When it splits. It will shut those fans off. You can wire it a number of ways along with programming.

    But when telling someone that has a rack that splits the fans, your also actuating the valve to shut that half of the condenser off.

  3. #3
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    No 4D's I got that, and I do know what a split condenser is

    but how I read that quote is CPC says a common way is to just lock out half the fans.

    then it goes on the mention you may also use a valve...but the first section (in red) just mentions shutting the fans down (nothing about the split valve)

    this is why I brought it up...ive never seen or heard of anyone just shutting down half the fans to obtain a split. But if you read that quote, it is what they are saying is "most common?" Am I reading that quote wrong???? technically just because you program an E2 to split a condenser does not mean you have to program a point into the split valve

  4. #4
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    I read that as its your pick as far as which fans you want off. But i would think that one would choose the fans within the circuit.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss View Post
    From the E2 book

    anyone ever seen a split condenser just shut off half the fans? Ive only seen the split valve setup that reduces 50%. +lock out the fans on the half split side.

    Was thinking about my post awhile back about double wide air cooled condensers and cycling fans off as singles instead of banks. Still think doing it as singles will cause one half of the condenser to over condense and the other half to under condense if not condense at all. And if just shutting down half the fans is considered an acceptable split condenser, that seems to verify that thinking.

    whatcha say?
    I guess I don't quite understand what you're asking. But it works just as Dow posted.
    When the system is in "split" the fans on the unused side of the condenser need to be turned off, regardless of the fan strategy being used in full condenser.
    "Don't wish it were easier, wish you were better"

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    I guess this is how I am reading it, i'll split it up for yall

    Option #1 (CPC says most common) *note, nothing about split valve*
    The most common way E2 achieves split mode in an
    air-cooled condenser with single-speed fans is to lock OFF
    50% of the total number of fans. You may choose to lock
    OFF all odd-numbered fans, even-numbered fans, the first
    half of all fans, or the last half of all fans.

    Option #2
    Split mode can also be achieved by activating a valve
    that bypasses a portion of the tubing in the condenser manifold.
    The resulting decrease in surface area results in
    reduced cooling.


    (Key words in option #2 are "Split mode can ALSO be achieved by") This indicates to me a separate method opposed to option#1.

    I understand option #2 as being more common, as all the split condensers I've seen use a valve.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by thefreezerguy View Post
    I guess I don't quite understand what you're asking.
    I am asking if anyone has ever seen what CPC is calling the "most common" way to split a air cooled condenser. And that's by just shutting down half the fans.

    As for what Dow said, I know and understand. But his answer was not for the question asked.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss View Post
    I guess this is how I am reading it, i'll split it up for yall

    Option #1 (CPC says most common) *note, nothing about split valve*
    The most common way E2 achieves split mode in an
    air-cooled condenser with single-speed fans is to lock OFF
    50% of the total number of fans. You may choose to lock
    OFF all odd-numbered fans, even-numbered fans, the first
    half of all fans, or the last half of all fans.

    Option #2
    Split mode can also be achieved by activating a valve
    that bypasses a portion of the tubing in the condenser manifold.
    The resulting decrease in surface area results in
    reduced cooling.


    (Key words in option #2 are "Split mode can ALSO be achieved by) This indicates to me a separate method opposed to option#1.

    I understand option #2 as being more common, as all the split condensers I've seen use a valve.


    I see what you're saying. A couple things. The E2 manual leaves a lot to be desired. Also, I have spoken to some CPC techs and engineers and they have some interesting ideas on condenser fan cycling, etc. This issue you brought up doesn't surprise me.
    "Don't wish it were easier, wish you were better"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss View Post
    From the E2 book

    anyone ever seen a split condenser just shut off half the fans? Ive only seen the split valve setup that reduces 50%. +lock out the fans on the half split side.

    Was thinking about my post awhile back about double wide air cooled condensers and cycling fans off as singles instead of banks. Still think doing it as singles will cause one half of the condenser to over condense and the other half to under condense if not condense at all. And if just shutting down half the fans is considered an acceptable split condenser, that seems to verify that thinking.

    whatcha say?
    When ya say double wide do you mean two fans side by side by however number deep. And banks as saying left fans by however deep & right fans by however deep. And left bank off or right bank off ?

  10. #10
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    IMHO CPC is a bunch of Tards and I was using this example the help show that.

    Unless anyone who as actually seen a condenser split in their "most common" way, please chime in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    When ya say double wide do you mean two fans side by side by however number deep. And banks as saying left fans by however deep & right fans by however deep. And left bank off or right bank off ?
    two fans side by side.

    Say a 6 fan, double wide would have 3 banks.

    Standing at the header end. Bank#1 would be header fans. Bank 2 would be middle fans, bank 3 would be far end fans

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss View Post
    two fans side by side.

    Say a 6 fan, double wide would have 3 banks.

    Standing at the header end. Bank#1 would be header fans. Bank 2 would be middle fans, bank 3 would be far end fans
    And how would your circuits be configured under those banks ?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    And how would your circuits be configured under those banks ?
    what do you mean? refrigeration circuits?

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