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  1. #1
    I know this topic has been hashed over so many times already, but just once more ...okay?


    We have experienced several compressor failures on this new account we took over last November.

    I understand my company cannot possibly have fixed all the screw ups left over from years of poor service/ lack of proper maintenance, etc.

    Does anyone perform something that cuts down on failures?
    Like oil sampling or just replacing the oil filters on a regular basis?
    How often do you go thru yoru racks and change the core driers out?

    Does anyone use acid testing as a means of preventative maintenance?


    I'm not trying to save the world here fellas.... I am just trying to get up to speed on what are viable methods of preventing failures in rack based compressors.
    Specifically the copelands. We're mainly running them on 22 with mineral.

  2. #2
    Acid testing at every compressor room p.m.

    Check differential across drier shell.

    Prove oil and high controls work semi-annually.

    OF-303 oil filters 2-3 times a year.

    If you see floodback, address it as soon as possible.

    High superheat, address it as soon as possible.
    (do not increase superheat to stop lines from sweating, that's what armaflex is for)

    TXV screens.

    Subcooling right? (compressors work longer if not)


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    How do you "see" floodback?????


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,578
    sometimes you cant do a thing, but make sure compression ratio is good, no flooback and oil failure controlls all work for starters

    Alot of 3D copeland just blow and L/T r-22 really sucks for comps if the suction is below 12 psig due to very high compression ratios!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,166
    Originally posted by condenseddave
    How do you "see" floodback?????

    My old man used to just feel it, no gauges or probes. Geez thats comin back SHARP he'd say, then he'd take out his magic wrench and we would go home.
    Watts New, Ohm My, I been Electrically Commutated. Are U2.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    If you have any suction cores in the unit take them out and throw them away. Suction cores are for start up and extreme compressor failures which are very rare in racks.

    Your liquid drier will take care of business. Change them once a year. If you have a problem rack, change them monthly for a couple of months. Then move on.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  7. #7
    "Problem Racks" ... some of these racks are so badly wired and maintained that only on Gilligna's Island would you find anything WORSE!


    I see down a line of the racks, all the oil filters for five racks. And NONE of them have been serviced in recent times.
    I look at the piping on some of the suction shells ... it would be impossible to even get the felt out cause there is ZERO clearance now in how they have been re-piped!

    And of course, I mentioned about the rusty bolts on the Sporlan shells. But this is not in every motor room ....



    What all started this thread was when I spnet some time with our Copeland dist in Austin asking about the possible causes of this one unit, a 6D going to ground after being online twenty fours hours or so ...

    We discussed paying for the tear down report.
    Do you guys ever use this service from Copeland? What's it cost?
    Should I have taken a few things apart myself for inspection? I guess that counda hurt.



    Thanks for all the input thus far.

  8. #8

    Exclamation

    Been saying this for years. Open up every compressor you change out. The insides are a story waiting to be read. At least take the plates off. If you have time the front bearing head and oil pump.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    One of my larger accounts requires a teardown on every single failure. No teardown, no checky.

    It's an excellent idea.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,578
    I also tear down the compressors when i think the problem may be a service related failure. I would look at the age of the compressor and try to guess if this rack had been run in extreme conditions. What controlls the rack suction pressure and how does the head pressure look?

  11. #11
    Originally posted by condenseddave
    One of my larger accounts requires a teardown on every single failure. No teardown, no checky.

    It's an excellent idea.
    Is that a copeland tear down or is it one you perform in the field?


    (When I tear one down in the field, do I have to get all the little goodies back inside?)


    jus kidding ....

  12. #12
    Originally posted by R12rules
    Originally posted by condenseddave
    One of my larger accounts requires a teardown on every single failure. No teardown, no checky.

    It's an excellent idea.
    Is that a copeland tear down or is it one you perform in the field?


    (When I tear one down in the field, do I have to get all the little goodies back inside?)


    jus kidding ....
    yes it is something you do, and no you do not have to reassemble it completely. It's already broken. Just make it so it does not leak oil all over the back of your van.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Orange County CA
    Posts
    1,084

    The Copeland class teacher said to just toss the parts back inside....literally.

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