Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,503

    Question

    Well, it's almost 2am and I'm still stressing. Coming to y'all again for advice/opinions...

    Due to health reasons, I may have to look for a 'desk job'. It's the proverbial 'if you can't stand the heat, get out 'da kitchen'...

    I figure if I can't continue doing what I'm doing, may as well move up a notch...

    Am I nuts in thinking about going to get an ME? I'd be about 45 y/o by graduation.... Sheesh, green @ 45...

    Family, 2 kids, successful one man shop. I have about 10 years of this trade as a tech under my belt, and some decent associated paper hanging on the walls.

    I have about 2 years of full active-duty GI Bill benefits remaining...

    Whadaya think?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern Ohio
    Posts
    43
    Go for it. A couple of hard years ahead, but get the family behind you and then reap the rewards until your retirement.

    You asked, may I be the first to deliver?


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas TX
    Posts
    2,216
    Bamacracker did the same thing about the same point in his life. I would say do it. Bama said he landed his dream job about 5 months ago as well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    tip of the mitt
    Posts
    1,974
    Good ole Bama, I can't believe he found somthing better than the Purina cat food factory.
    I have my own little world. But it's OK...they know me here.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    3,182

    Thumbs up

    He jumped up to the "kibbles & Bits" factory I believe. Its amazing the "gravy" jobs one can get when one calls themself an engineer.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    2,407
    I thought ME stood for Medical Examiner

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    Where is Bamacracker at? I haven't see him post in long while.

    You know something, I was reading this article the other day, about the fact that on average 75% of the college population are of the adult variety, ages ranging from a few years beyond High School to 80 years old, and the majority of the adult education people are in the 30's and 40's. So your not alone in trying to return for your degree. You might be pleasantly surprized that some to most of your classmates hold down full time jobs and have families and are juggling the best they can to get their education.

    From the financial point of veiw, atleast till you do get your first job after your graduation, I personally think the best way to do this is to remain self employed and shift your work and customers around your class schedule. No where will you find that flexibility working for someone else as you pursue your degree.

    I wish you all the luck. And. Don't contemplate it all that much. Just jump in. If it don't work, it don't work, but if it does and you do well, just think where you might be in 6 or seven years. Kids out of the house, making some decent coin, decent work. No manual intensive labor any longer.

    I personally, lately have been thinking in a simialair way. I am doing well. I had more than myself before as a shop and I wasn't built for that. I have reduced down to myself and another guy. It's okay. But, it's not that millionaire dream thing to me either anymore. I have become more realisitic. I make very decent money but, I work for it as a small company. I too want to look into the option for later where I am not the one humping it. I thought if I had built my shop up, that at 40 or 50, I would just manage. I guess I could change the gear once again and get to that level but, who knows. But thats just one option. The other options could become more clear with a degree. I am rambling. Good Luck to you..

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902
    After moving around for years you will need a fat ass to be a ME and sit at a desk all day and the patients to work for someone else.. Bama has a fat ass.

    I sub the attic jobs out and have about 10 years on ya and I bet a few pounds. Heat = Money.

    Good luck with what ever you do.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    Originally posted by htg guy
    He jumped up to the "kibbles & Bits" factory I believe. Its amazing the "gravy" jobs one can get when one calls themself an engineer.
    It's IAMS to be precise.

    Damn, Kibbles and Bits? He can't stand Kibbles and Bits.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Slacking off right now
    Posts
    7,546
    Am I nuts in thinking about going to get an ME? I'd be about 45 y/o by graduation.... Sheesh, green @ 45...

    well if you don't do it now you will be 45 yrs old anyway WITHOUT an ME
    you will just be older thats all

    my dad started his apprenticeship at 52

    so you have no excuses you are the one who is stopping you you are the one who is doubting you
    www.vetopropac.com - The best tool bags on the market - The offical tool bag of choice by techs everywhere

    Arguing with some people is like wrestling a pig - eventually you realise the pig actually enjoys it

    Gonads serve a useful purpose but are no substitute for brains

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,422
    I have a BSME and a PE license. I also worked in the field for five years. The Engineering license is something I am proud of, but the five years of field experience are more valuable.

    There are lots of office jobs in which an engineering degree would not help you that much. I work as an estimator/project manager for a company that does large healthcare projects. You don't need an engineering degree to do this type of job.

    If you would like to work for a design engineering firm, an engineering degree would be important. I would not like this type of job. I know a lot of guys that do this type of work and it would not be for me. They spend most of their time doing autocad work. Don't get out of the office very often.

    If I were you, I would figure out the type of job that would be most enjoyable, and then decide if the degree would be worth persuing. Good luck to you.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,503

    hey thanks for the replies

    Bama was the 1st person I thought of when considering this change; I get the impression he's still miffed at me from way back when I questioned "do heat pumps really save money"....

    Still not enthused about givin' up my freedom, but if I stay in this industry, I think I'd like to get on with a major mfr, if possible. Doing what, I don't know. Don't really have much experience on anything big, DDC or BAS (althought I'd sure like to learn).

    Went to the AAON school last month, that was impressive to me (1st factory scool). The enginers that spoke seemed like brainiacs, and most seemed tp be right around 30 or so...

    In February, I competed a 7 week Basic Instructor Course from the Air Force which should come in handy sometime...

    Bigtime, thanks for your answer. I read it 5 times. 4 years back in school at this point in my life would be a HUGE undertaking, not to mention I suck at math...

    How does one go about moving up from the typical technician position into one of those office jobs? I don't even think I know enough about what all HVAC-related jobs actually exist in this industry, on a factory, design or engineering level.




  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    32
    I say go for it. You are old enough to know but remember education and degrees don't guarantee anything. It just provides more and different opportunities. It is what you do with these opportunities that make the difference. A person of your experience and maturity will probably find it easier than the youngsters once you blow out the cobwebs. I imagine you will just have to fight the time issue. At twenty, time seemed to be in over supply. At 36 it is precious resource I try and use wisely. At least that was my experience.
    Do it. America needs more home grown engineers.

    Another good field with a lot of demand: Nursing. My wife is getting her RN and it is amazing how accommodating the employers are to someone who is motivated and the pay is good too. Heck, I might follow her.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event