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  1. #1
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    Mar 2007
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    Universal Nolin Reach In

    got an old two door reach in thats forming ice on the divider between the doors. Its a CLM-50. Gaskets are good. Is there a heater in the divider?

  2. #2
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    Nov 2009
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    If its a freezer it has to have one.
    "Don't wish it were easier, wish you were better"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ar_hvac_man View Post
    got an old two door reach in thats forming ice on the divider between the doors. Its a CLM-50. Gaskets are good. Is there a heater in the divider?
    Every mullion heater failure I've seen has been in the wiring not the heater itself. Unless it uses hot gas. Never had a problem with those.

  4. #4
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    I am home sick sitting on the couch and have been searching for a schematic for you. I am coming up with nothing. Sorry!
    "Don't wish it were easier, wish you were better"

  5. #5
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    the problem was burnt wiring like mentioned in an earlier post. thanks.

  6. #6
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    drain pan has three rust holes in it. this thing is a fossil. my question is, is there anything that i can use such as jb weld or an epoxy that will cure in freezing conditions so i dont have to shut the machine down or empty it of product?

  7. #7
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    If this is anything like some of the OLD Kelvinators I've worked on, it's impossible to get a new pan. I'm gonna guess that a portion of the defrost calrod is in contact with the evap pan (by design in lieu of a drain line heater) and that the rust holes are along those contact points. If so, you can use jbweld for small holes, but get the kind that is impregnated with steel to maintain heat conductivity. Finish off the edges of the patch with some hi/low temp silicon. Larger holes are a pain and require sheet metal patches. I know it sounds like a hack but when the customer wants a fix and the pans are obsolete, you do what you can.

    Just don't run the unit for too long without the pan in place or lack of proper airflow over the coil can cause floodback.

  8. #8
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    Forgot to mention that the jbweld sets and cures rapidly and haven't had any problems in low temp. Finding a silicon that takes the hi/low temp is easy but cure time might be an issue. If you do a good job prepping surface and feathering the jbweld, you may be able to forget the silly-cone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    I've repaired several drain pans using fiberglass cloth and resin. It's available in a kit at any automotive supply.

    You really don't have to empty the whole case, usually just the top shelf. Shut it down, remove the pan, use a heat gun to warm it up and dry it well. Then sand down the rusted areas with a medium grit sandpaper. (I use an orbital sander for this.)

    Cut the fiberglass cloth to fit, mix the resin & hardener, apply a base coat of resin to the inside of the pan, apply the cloth and then top coat of resin to a smooth finish. It sets up hard and dry in less than 30 minutes. Then paint with Rustoleum satin white. That'll dry in about 30 minutes.

    Then re-install the pan and fire the box back up. Altogether, it should take less than 2 hours to do.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    I've repaired several drain pans using fiberglass cloth and resin. It's available in a kit at any automotive supply.

    You really don't have to empty the whole case, usually just the top shelf. Shut it down, remove the pan, use a heat gun to warm it up and dry it well. Then sand down the rusted areas with a medium grit sandpaper. (I use an orbital sander for this.)

    Cut the fiberglass cloth to fit, mix the resin & hardener, apply a base coat of resin to the inside of the pan, apply the cloth and then top coat of resin to a smooth finish. It sets up hard and dry in less than 30 minutes. Then paint with Rustoleum satin white. That'll dry in about 30 minutes.

    Then re-install the pan and fire the box back up. Altogether, it should take less than 2 hours to do.
    Good info. Thanks!

  11. #11
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    thanks for all the replies. i think ill use icemeisters fix.

    yes the small holes are in a straight line that mirror where the defrost rod is laying/attached to the pan. the larger hole(about the size of a pencil) is adjacent to the drain hole where the water has just been sitting due to the drain tube being clogged.

    another question. the drain tube was clogged with ice. i know a quick-fix for resi refigerators is to wrap a piece of copper around the defrost heater(if its not one of the glass ones) and stick the other end into the drain hole. i dont see why it wouldnt work in this application as well?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ar_hvac_man View Post
    another question. the drain tube was clogged with ice. i know a quick-fix for resi refigerators is to wrap a piece of copper around the defrost heater(if its not one of the glass ones) and stick the other end into the drain hole. i dont see why it wouldnt work in this application as well?
    I've used a drain tube heater to solve that problem. They're inserted into the drain line from the pan and do a good job. I get them from Refrigeration Hardware Supply:

    http://rhsc.net/images/2007GENPDFs/182.pdf

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ar_hvac_man View Post
    thanks for all the replies. i think ill use icemeisters fix.

    yes the small holes are in a straight line that mirror where the defrost rod is laying/attached to the pan. the larger hole(about the size of a pencil) is adjacent to the drain hole where the water has just been sitting due to the drain tube being clogged.

    another question. the drain tube was clogged with ice. i know a quick-fix for resi refigerators is to wrap a piece of copper around the defrost heater(if its not one of the glass ones) and stick the other end into the drain hole. i dont see why it wouldnt work in this application as well?
    Got a call from a customer this morning telling me that their evap pan has a 1" x 8" rust hole in it and they are finally tired of emptying out the bucket that they put on the top shelf to catch the water, and would I fix it for them.

    I'm gonna go with the resin/fiberglass fix. Will also blow out the drain line with nitrogen because these older units get a lot of sediment in the ptrap that backs up the water to the section of the line inside the case, which will then freeze up. Sometimes thats all it takes if there is no drain heater.

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