Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 27 to 39 of 44
  1. #27

    Cool

    Sounds like our history is sorta the same Dowa. I got into the trade as a summer job while doing college. Started in small stores, restraunts etc...Then got my big chance at markets and industrial when I got hired at Hussmann San Jose. At the time they were still manufacturing industrial equipment and the Hussmann TD System for the markets. What an eye opener from where I had been working. Got good at the market stuff pretty fast cuz I loved it. Got to work on a fair amount if industrial stuff in the way of wineries, food packaging and frozen storeage. That was really cool, but then Hussmann lost all of their good engineers for that type of work. They all left and went into thier own ventures. Moved to the local Tyler refrigeration rep and really got into the markets. Now at the end on the pendulum swing, I have seen the light that the money is the same in HVAC for a lot less physical effort, but the mental challenges are not the same as refrigeration. Even the big process water and a/c jobs are all packaged equipment. And most of the manufactures, mainly Trane here, are real tight with the liturature that realy helps in the trouble shooting of the equipment. But it is paying the bills quite well, and I don't have to work an average of 60 hours a week anymore.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    I personally think that, after my experience in grocery work, has given me such a broader mind, you know what I am saying. That level of thinking. It's a tough damn job, not only physically but I think the most mentally challenging. And I went from that and use to doing 60 to 70 hours a week to HVAC. I would bee bop into some office building. Got a few tennants down. Get them taken care of, go to the roof or penthouse and check on the equipment. It's a fricken breeze. It's so much simpler. I am trying to get that sort of work now. And it's coming. I don't want to disrespect anyone on the HVAC side. All I am saying is, if you have seasoned in the grocery stores, larger tonnage hvac is the place to be. I prefer roof top stuff in the 75 to 100 ton range and some built up stuff with AHU's and splits. Boilers, there ok. But again. You walk into the penthouse which is basically your return air plenum with the air down, the whole building with out air, everyone is screaming. That stress aint nothing to compare to when a rack is down. When that rack is down, the whole world is on hold till I walk out of that room.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    Big commercial A/C is no doubt easier than market work. It actually pays better too.

    I read an article maybe a year ago, that pointed out the labor rate differences between the two. Supermarket service companies had lower hourly rates on average.

    Get that? you have to know more but get paid less. Supermarkets generate a lot of work though, and they pay their bills.

    The things I don't like about A/C work; A lot of bad engineering, and a lot of poorly thought out, and applied corrections to that engineering.



    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Orange County CA
    Posts
    1,084
    Originally posted by Dowadudda
    I personally think that, after my experience in grocery work, has given me such a broader mind, you know what I am saying. That level of thinking. It's a tough damn job, not only physically but I think the most mentally challenging. And I went from that and use to doing 60 to 70 hours a week to HVAC. I would bee bop into some office building. Got a few tennants down. Get them taken care of, go to the roof or penthouse and check on the equipment. It's a fricken breeze. It's so much simpler. I am trying to get that sort of work now. And it's coming. I don't want to disrespect anyone on the HVAC side. All I am saying is, if you have seasoned in the grocery stores, larger tonnage hvac is the place to be. I prefer roof top stuff in the 75 to 100 ton range and some built up stuff with AHU's and splits. Boilers, there ok. But again. You walk into the penthouse which is basically your return air plenum with the air down, the whole building with out air, everyone is screaming. That stress aint nothing to compare to when a rack is down. When that rack is down, the whole world is on hold till I walk out of that room.
    Hey Dow,
    are you out of the markets now?

  5. #31
    Originally posted by frozensolid
    Big commercial A/C is no doubt easier than market work. It actually pays better too.

    I read an article maybe a year ago, that pointed out the labor rate differences between the two. Supermarket service companies had lower hourly rates on average.

    Get that? you have to know more but get paid less. Supermarkets generate a lot of work though, and they pay their bills.

    The things I don't like about A/C work; A lot of bad engineering, and a lot of poorly thought out, and applied corrections to that engineering.



    Yep that is the other plus to what I am doing now verses what I was doing in markets. For all of you union guys out there you are probably aware that Hussmann has negotiated for the past several years directly with the UA, and have set a market refrigeration rate. Here in the bay area (San Francisco) that rate is quite a bit lower than the regular rate for the HVAC guys. Go figure???? Easier work load, better hours, less stress equals more money???? Sounds backwards to me. And again, if it aint fixed a 3:30 it gets fixed tomorrow. No more your working till the ice cream is hard again.

    With all that said,,,,,,,,I still miss refrigeration at least 3 days a week. Very little real mechanical work in HVAC like in REFER

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Orange County CA
    Posts
    1,084
    Here in So Cal,Hussmann does have different rates then the rest of us "union slobs"

    I'm told I.R. (their owner) would really like to ditch the union all together. Locally they have laid off about 70 - 80 techs(more or less).Some of which I now work with.
    Some of their ex - employees got a 5 dollar an hour raise by just changing shirts.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    4,879
    Soon the markets are going price themselves right out of the talent. When that happens we won't look so expensive anymore.
    A Diamond is just a piece of coal, that made good under pressure!

  8. #34
    Originally posted by frozensolid
    Soon the markets are going price themselves right out of the talent. When that happens we won't look so expensive anymore.
    That really SUCKS!!!

    I have been working in this trade for over twenty years and now I am just begining my adventure into serious super market systems! And I am learning that my pay will drop significantly and never ever reach the level I once received doing simple commercial refrigeration work!
    Plus ... I got this learning curve that is pretty steep some days!

    Last job I was working ins some fast food and school district stuff. Piece of cake. No learning curve. Top dollar for the area to boot.


    What is wrong with market contractors?

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Orange County CA
    Posts
    1,084
    What is wrong with market contractors? [/B]
    This is Hussmann...the once mighty Hussmann.
    When I.R. bought them , rumors were flyin' on the Nextels. They are anti-union. I'm not "Johnny union",but it is a bummer if it is true.Time will tell.

    R -12,
    Your wages should not suffer.As you have recently noticed,market work is not for everyone.
    The hours,the stress, how can wages go down,who would do it for less? I know I'm barely able to do it for what I'm makin'.(I'm not cheap)


  10. #36
    I know where my service manager has been and what he has done. I know what he is capable of performing.

    Basically, for the wages he quoted me ... $22 an hour is tops, he said for this company.

    He is slumming it for sure. He would go to work for just about any company and make boo-koo more than he is making here.
    Me, well .... I am not worth what he is. Not for the same work anyway.
    He and I each have our own specialties...

    Anyway ... $22 and hour ... tops .... I would imagine they would start someone out at that pay rate and in short order ... INCREASE them upwards.

    My co-worker has told me he could go elsewhere and earn more money.

    I am making fifteen right now. And benefits are still months away.


    Dont get me wrong, I am very very thankful for the op to work for this company, with these men and to learn this facet of market refrigeration service work!

    However ... I must be able to provide for my family. And theonly way I am going to be able to do so is by living frugally.


    I was taken to lunch yesterday by the son of the owner's wife.
    He was explaining to me how market service work has been price war driven to the brink of disaster.

    I'd say it's time to cut and run. It's time to transition into another facet of service work where there IS money to be made and men to earn it.
    Right now we are having difficulty finding people to do the work with us.


    Well ... if the wages are not there, then it's a no brainer WHY people arent falling over themselves to get in with us.


    Something is very definately wrong here!!!

    What do you think?

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Orange County CA
    Posts
    1,084
    with the lack of willing talent , there will eventually be a point at which something will have to give.
    Response times suffer , quality of work, and eventually the sanity of remaining techs.
    At which point,the remaining techs threaten to leave, the employer comes back with a raise( if they are worth it), the service rates increase.

    These markets make a ****load of money. I have seen them actually beg a responsable company to respond to a service call because of the "lowballers" can't hang.

    R 12 hang in there and learn.
    Then go hunting for a better wage.


  12. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    It's changing already.

    Lowballers are starting to show their true lack of ability now, and it's paying off in a big way for us.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,578
    I saw the same thing as you Dave, but very slowly.The union guys putting down 30 per hour pluss 5 per hour in the pension and a TOP supermarket guy making 28 pluss 3 per hour for pension.

    R-12 just make sure you get the hours on your ticketts if you know whay i mean!.i got 10 hours a week in travel alone!

    Hang in there you will not regret the experience you will gain and once the company sees your ability you may pass your boss with him not knowing.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event