Preheating the flue liner to get draft?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    East berlin, PA
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    281

    Preheating the flue liner to get draft?

    I was talking to a guy recently and he said when he burns wood he has to preheat his flue liner till it starts to draft or his house fills with smoke. He lives out in the country. I'm no chimney expert, but shouldn't draft cold as long as it sits high enough in relation to the roof? He says his brother has the same problem and he lives in town. I don't think the chimneys were built by the same person either. Is this ever normal? what IS normal?
    "Delay is preferable to error"- Thomas Jefferson

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    Probably green wood, or a clogged chimney cap. Never hurts to hold a newspaper up the flue to get it going, but if you need more than one there is probably a problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
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    2,964
    Sometimes I have to crack open a nearby window to get a draft going, especially if it is very cold outside. That cold air residing in the chimney is heavy and fights the initial draft of warm air up the chimney.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
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    6,130

    Exclamation search this site

    If you search this forum, you'll get more advice on how to burn relatively smoke free.

    If your chimney is gunked up with creosote, the torch trick can ignite a chimney fire so inspect often and sweep as needed.

    There's a lot more to draft and flow than chimney height in relation to the roof.

    Hearthman

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    East berlin, PA
    Posts
    281

    Draft

    Quote"There's a lot more to draft and flow than chimney height in relation to the roof." Unquote


    I do understand that there is more to draft than that, I was just generalizing.

    I remember reading years ago in an oil burner book about draft and that as the air moves horizontally over the chimney cap it's supposed to create a suction or something like that.

    I will read over this forum to get more info.


    Thanks
    "Delay is preferable to error"- Thomas Jefferson

  6. #6
    I have never heard of pre-heating a chimney liner, but I guess if it did get cold enough outside you might.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    9
    With home being built so air tight these days, draft problems are more common than you think. I know a lot of people who have to "pre-heat" their liner. If it still smokes into the house after a hot fire gets going, then I would look into chimney height issues.

    A good ol' chimney cleaning will help draft, especially if there is a large amount of creosote buildup.

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