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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    865

    How do I get these bedrooms warmer?

    Got a pellet stove a little while back. We installed it downstairs. We live in a bi level house. The downstairs is very hot even upstairs, but the back bedrooms are cold. The bedrooms are right over were the pellet stove is but on the second floor. How do I get those bedrooms warmer? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    916
    move the fan switch from auto to ON on your t-stat and let the indoor unit circulate air thru your house

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northwest Arkansas via Chicago Area via Straight Up from There on Lake Superior
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by Vinpadalino View Post
    Got a pellet stove a little while back. We installed it downstairs. We live in a bi level house. The downstairs is very hot even upstairs, but the back bedrooms are cold. The bedrooms are right over were the pellet stove is but on the second floor. How do I get those bedrooms warmer? Thanks.
    Honest, I am not being a wise a..s, but my father-in-law frequently heated his Lake Superior home with a small wood stove in the basement. He installed a grate between the basement and the first floor to get the heat to rise. Not very scientific but it worked for him.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    865
    Quote Originally Posted by jerryd_2008 View Post
    Honest, I am not being a wise a..s, but my father-in-law frequently heated his Lake Superior home with a small wood stove in the basement. He installed a grate between the basement and the first floor to get the heat to rise. Not very scientific but it worked for him.
    I tried the fan. Didn't work that great and didn't want to waste the electric. I have to block the stairway because it acts like a chimney right? Get a piece of plywood and block the opening. Thats asking for trouble with my kids. What about cracking the window in those rooms creating a draft?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northwest Arkansas via Chicago Area via Straight Up from There on Lake Superior
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by Vinpadalino View Post
    I tried the fan. Didn't work that great and didn't want to waste the electric. I have to block the stairway because it acts like a chimney right? Get a piece of plywood and block the opening. Thats asking for trouble with my kids. What about cracking the window in those rooms creating a draft?
    Not an expert but I'm not following. What I described was just a floor penetration between the lower and upper areas with a grate installed for air movement.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,228

    Cool options

    If you have forced air heat, the aforementioned use of the convection blower is the most effiicient means of heat transfer. If you have radiant heat, then you would have to look at using the stairwells as passive convection 'chimneys' and supplemental powered transfer fan/ grilles. There is a 10x10" floor register from Leigh with a 2 speed 180 cfm blower available. If you need to get heat from a basement to a second floor with no existing ductwork, you might consider ducts in a stud cavity.

    The bottom line is, central heaters require some means of moving heat around a home evenly whereas pellet and woodstoves are 'zone' heaters and not intended as the primary source of heat. You cannot connect them directly to duct work. You also need to check your local codes before doing any of this. I recommend you have an NFI Certified Pellet technician inspect your stove installation before use, too.

    HTH,
    Hearthman

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    916
    hey hearthman, could you suggest a woodstove from northern tool. i am looking for one for my house...


    hijack

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,228

    Exclamation choosing a stove

    Hi Jack,
    I don't get into endorsing particular brands of stoves, esp. those for which I have not examined or serviced after having seen them installed and burned for a few years.

    I looked on Northern' site and I do not see some important information on these stoves. Your stove should be listed to UL 1482 by a recognized testing lab---not just 'tested to'. This could mean it was tested and failed. It could also mean it was tested by someone other than a recognized testing lab. A lot of that going around these days.

    Next, it must be certified by a recognized testing lab to the EPAs Phase II emissions requirements.

    You need to examine the warranty to see if it covers internet sales. Also, should you have a warranty claim, who do you contact? Do they have local resources to some on site and see it? Otherwise, how else would they prosecute a warranty claim? Look at the mfr.---ever heard of them? Go online and look up their financial status. Are they deeply in debt or stable? Many are going under and won't be around should you have a warranty issue or need parts. What do you do if you receive the stove damaged?

    To answer these questions, I always strongly advise people to buy from their local professional hearth shop and have them professionally plan and install it. A few dollars saved by buying online can result in some very expensive problems down the road.

    Hearthman

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    916

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by hearthman View Post
    Hi Jack,
    I don't get into endorsing particular brands of stoves, esp. those for which I have not examined or serviced after having seen them installed and burned for a few years.

    I looked on Northern' site and I do not see some important information on these stoves. Your stove should be listed to UL 1482 by a recognized testing lab---not just 'tested to'. This could mean it was tested and failed. It could also mean it was tested by someone other than a recognized testing lab. A lot of that going around these days.

    Next, it must be certified by a recognized testing lab to the EPAs Phase II emissions requirements.

    You need to examine the warranty to see if it covers internet sales. Also, should you have a warranty claim, who do you contact? Do they have local resources to some on site and see it? Otherwise, how else would they prosecute a warranty claim? Look at the mfr.---ever heard of them? Go online and look up their financial status. Are they deeply in debt or stable? Many are going under and won't be around should you have a warranty issue or need parts. What do you do if you receive the stove damaged?

    To answer these questions, I always strongly advise people to buy from their local professional hearth shop and have them professionally plan and install it. A few dollars saved by buying online can result in some very expensive problems down the road.

    Hearthman
    is it that technical, I'm a licensed contractor.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    east brookfield ma
    Posts
    55
    here is what they are talking about a floor vent this is above the woodstove in the basement and it lets heat from downstairs go up.
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