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Thread: Deck Material

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Minnesota/North Dakota
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    1,191
    I am investigating the build of two decks on my home. I prefer a low maintenace material, hate the look of vinyl decking, and do not like the way cedar ages. Redwood appears very nice, but needs yearly staining and sealing in my neck of the woods. Any ideas on what materials would fit into my plans? Pressure treated pine needs a year, from what I am told, before any staining or sealer can applied.

    Thanks
    REAK

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
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    34,902
    If I were within 3 feet of the ground I would use concrete. I can show your pictures and I will of one I did myself behind my house.

    Wood is nothing but a maintenance nightmare after a few years and I hated it. I removed mine and poured the mud. Then I put a acid stain on it. I have $800 dollars in it.







    [Edited by James 3528 on 04-05-2004 at 10:47 AM]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,209
    With all those trees,Fall must be a nightmare. Noticed you don't have gutters to clean on back of house. Nice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    southern NY State (lower Hudson Valley).
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    178
    http://www.trex.com/

    No staining (unless you want to for color), no splits, splinters or rotting, weathers to a nice light grey. Completely impervious to water, it's made from recycled plastics and wood.

    Downsides: a little pricey, and heavy (about double the weight of PTL), which you won't care about after the deck is built. It's not a structural material, so the deck is framed with PTL and then you use the trex for the floor and other horizontal surfaces.

    We loved our trex deck (last house). We did the railings and steps with trex too.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Ottawa, Ont. Canada
    Posts
    1,729
    Originally posted by richard_f
    http://www.trex.com/

    No staining (unless you want to for color), no splits, splinters or rotting, weathers to a nice light grey. Completely impervious to water, it's made from recycled plastics and wood.

    Downsides: a little pricey, and heavy (about double the weight of PTL), which you won't care about after the deck is built. It's not a structural material, so the deck is framed with PTL and then you use the trex for the floor and other horizontal surfaces.

    We loved our trex deck (last house). We did the railings and steps with trex too.
    I noticed in the picture that it has a "grain". I couldn't find a close up look, what does the "grain" look like close up, like, does it look phony?

    don
    don sleeth - HVAC-Talk Founder
    HVAC Computer Systems
    Heat Load Calculation Software

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Minnesota/North Dakota
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    1,191
    Originally posted by Don Sleeth
    Originally posted by richard_f
    http://www.trex.com/

    No staining (unless you want to for color), no splits, splinters or rotting, weathers to a nice light grey. Completely impervious to water, it's made from recycled plastics and wood.

    Downsides: a little pricey, and heavy (about double the weight of PTL), which you won't care about after the deck is built. It's not a structural material, so the deck is framed with PTL and then you use the trex for the floor and other horizontal surfaces.

    We loved our trex deck (last house). We did the railings and steps with trex too.
    I noticed in the picture that it has a "grain". I couldn't find a close up look, what does the "grain" look like close up, like, does it look phony?

    don
    I seen this stuff at the local joint here. It is durable and rugged, but no grain. I think this is what I am going with, but not quite sure as of yet. From what I am told, it does weather a bit, but not as extreme as wood.

    Thanks
    REAK

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
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    34,902
    Form a close relationship with a orthopedic surgeon.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Colorado flatland native
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    15,067
    I agree with James (first time in forever!), My decks will be replaced with stamped concrete this summer. I dont car what type decking you use...... If you still have wood supports. I'll build a concrete foundation, fill it with sand, and pour a concrete top. Deck you dont have to worry about and no moisture near the foundation (mines 100+ yr. old sandstone and mortar).
    My doctor gave me six months to live, but when I couldn't pay the bill he gave me six months more.
    Walter Matthau

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Minnesota/North Dakota
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    I am above the height minimums. One deck is 6' high and the other is 4' high. Otherwise, you guys are absolutely correct.

    Thanks
    REAK

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902

    Thumbs up



    Originally posted by spotts
    I agree with James (first time in forever!),
    Well Woopteedo. Your first correct post!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    southern NY State (lower Hudson Valley).
    Posts
    178
    Originally posted by Reak
    Originally posted by Don Sleeth
    Originally posted by richard_f
    http://www.trex.com/

    No staining (unless you want to for color), no splits, splinters or rotting, weathers to a nice light grey. Completely impervious to water, it's made from recycled plastics and wood.

    Downsides: a little pricey, and heavy (about double the weight of PTL), which you won't care about after the deck is built. It's not a structural material, so the deck is framed with PTL and then you use the trex for the floor and other horizontal surfaces.

    We loved our trex deck (last house). We did the railings and steps with trex too.
    I noticed in the picture that it has a "grain". I couldn't find a close up look, what does the "grain" look like close up, like, does it look phony?

    don
    I seen this stuff at the local joint here. It is durable and rugged, but no grain. I think this is what I am going with, but not quite sure as of yet. From what I am told, it does weather a bit, but not as extreme as wood.

    Thanks
    REAK
    No grain, just a light texture to the surface from the ground up wood and plastic mix. It will be completely weathered withing 6 weeks of exposure, and then never change any further. Any lumber yard that carries it should have samples weathered and unweathered. It is extremely durable. I used stainless steel screws as fasteners and the trex mushroomed over the screw heads and covered most of them so they're not even visible. Trex is great. Make sure you have a helper for lifting it into place, it is heavy.



    [Edited by richard_f on 04-05-2004 at 02:16 PM]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    99
    I put a PTW deck on several years ago and have regretted not going the extra $ for a manufactured product.

    The contractor (a friend) came back several months after the deck was completed and said "Look at those gaps - those deck boards really shrank!"

    I can wait to rip it all off and re-do it.

    Jim


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Gone
    Posts
    5,340
    Reak:

    Go to this website http://www.choicedek.com This product will make your deck look like a million dollars. I had a friend who used it to build a huge deck and it was very classy looking. The product is made by Weyerhaeuser.

    Go to FAQS>Where can I see or purchase choicedek? to find a supplier close to you.

    Try to find a deck built with this material and go look at it and you will see what I mean, you will not be sorry.

    madeinusa

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