Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 66 to 78 of 81
  1. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    Lets put Saudia Arabia on the list


    Two Americans Among Dead in Saudi Attack
    Three Other Westerners, Saudi Killed in Assault

    RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (May 1) - Gunmen entered the office of an oil contractor in Saudi Arabia and began shooting at random Saturday, killing at least six people - two American engineers, two Britons, an Australian and a Saudi - in what a Saudi official called an ''indiscriminate evil rampage.''

    The fleeing gunmen led police on a chase through the northwest Saudi city of Yanbu, exchanging fire outside a Holiday Inn before police caught up with them in a downtown shootout, a witness said. The Interior Ministry said three attackers were killed and one was captured.



    .

    There was no immediate word on who was behind the shooting, but U.S. officials had warned in recent weeks of possible attacks against foreigners in Saudi Arabia, an important U.S. ally.

    The attack began at a petrochemical plant co-owned by Exxon Mobil and the Saudi company SABIC.

    ''Four individuals entered the offices of a Saudi contractor and randomly shot at Saudi and foreign employees,'' the Interior Ministry said in a statement.

    The assailants fled into residential neighborhoods of Yanbu, 550 miles west of Riyadh, and commandeered cars, ''but security forces were able to kill three of them and injure and capture the fourth,'' the ministry said.

    A witness, who spoke only on condition of anonymity, said a gunbattle erupted during the chase outside the Holiday Inn hotel, and that the gunmen fled to downtown Yanbu before police caught up with them.

    Saudi Arabia's ambassador to Britain, Prince Turki al-Faisal, offered condolences to the families of those killed.



    ''We will not be discouraged by this brutal incident in which innocent lives were lost - British, American and Australian as well as Saudi Arabian - and many people injured in an indiscriminate evil rampage,'' Prince Turki said in London.

    Two Americans were killed, the U.S. State Department said. ABB-Lummus, the energy arm of multinational engineering company ABB, said both were engineers for the company. A British ABB employee, a British contractor and an Australian employee were also killed, spokesman Bjorn Edlund said from Zurich, Switzerland.

    Two American ABB-Lummus employees were wounded in the attack, one critically, he said. He wasn't sure how many others were wounded. Edlund said ABB employs hundreds of expatriates in Saudi Arabia and more than 50 Americans in Yanbu alone.

    ''It is obviously an enormous blow. Losing five employees in a terrorist attack is a terrible, terrible thing to happen,'' Edlund said. ''We are trying to deal with it as best as we can.''

    A spokeswoman from Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade identified the Australian killed in the attack as Anthony Richard Mason, 57, from the state of Western Australia.

    European diplomats, who confirmed the five Westerners had died, also said a member of the Saudi national guard was killed. A Saudi police captain was seriously wounded, the diplomats said on condition of anonymity. A Canadian diplomat in Riyadh said two Canadian citizens also were hospitalized, but the diplomat had no details on their condition.

    In Texas, Exxon Mobile spokesman Tom Cirigliano confirmed the company co-owns a petrochemical facility in Yanbu, but said he had no information about the attack. He said the facility was operating normally and that no Exxon Mobil employees were hurt.

    ''We abhor any violent attacks like this,'' he said.

    Saudi Arabia relies heavily on 6 million expatriate workers, including about 30,000 Americans, to run its oil industry and other sectors.

    The last attack that killed Americans in Saudi Arabia was in May 2003, when eight Americans were among 34 people killed in a series of coordinated suicide bombings in the capital, Riyadh. That attack and a November assault on a housing compound that killed 17 people were blamed on the al-Qaida terror network.

    Last month, the United States ordered the departure of nonessential U.S. government employees and family members from Saudi Arabia and also urged private citizens to depart. The embassy had warned of ''credible indications of terrorist threats aimed at American and Western interests in Saudi Arabia.''

    The U.S. Embassy official said the U.S. consulate in the Red Sea port city of Jiddah was following up the issue with Saudi authorities. Yanbu is about 220 miles northwest of Jiddah, also on the Red Sea.

    ''We are working with authorities to determine the facts,'' State Department spokeswoman Susan Pittman said from Washington.

    A Yanbu resident said by telephone that police had set up checkpoints throughout the city, and that some of the Westerners involved in the oil industry in Yanbu were unable to reach their workplaces because of the heavy police presence.

    The May 2003 housing compound attack was seen as a wake-up call to Saudis of the dangers of Islamic militants at home. Al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden was born and raised in the kingdom, but expelled in 1994 for agitating against the monarchy.

    Saudi security forces have been hunting Islamic militants, resulting in frequent deadly clashes in recent months.

    An American was also killed in a May 1, 2003, shooting attack at the King Abdul Aziz Naval base in Jubail, about 250 miles northeast of Riyadh. Few details about that shooting were released. The attacker, who was dressed in a Saudi navy uniform, escaped.


    05-01-04 1227EDT




    There was no immediate word on who was behind the shooting, but U.S. officials had warned in recent weeks of possible attacks against foreigners in Saudi Arabia, an important U.S. ally.

    The attack began at a petrochemical plant co-owned by Exxon Mobil and the Saudi company SABIC.

    ''Four individuals entered the offices of a Saudi contractor and randomly shot at Saudi and foreign employees,'' the Interior Ministry said in a statement.

    The assailants fled into residential neighborhoods of Yanbu, 550 miles west of Riyadh, and commandeered cars, ''but security forces were able to kill three of them and injure and capture the fourth,'' the ministry said.

    A witness, who spoke only on condition of anonymity, said a gunbattle erupted during the chase outside the Holiday Inn hotel, and that the gunmen fled to downtown Yanbu before police caught up with them.

    Saudi Arabia's ambassador to Britain, Prince Turki al-Faisal, offered condolences to the families of those killed.


    ''We will not be discouraged by this brutal incident in which innocent lives were lost - British, American and Australian as well as Saudi Arabian - and many people injured in an indiscriminate evil rampage,'' Prince Turki said in London.

    Two Americans were killed, the U.S. State Department said. ABB-Lummus, the energy arm of multinational engineering company ABB, said both were engineers for the company. A British ABB employee, a British contractor and an Australian employee were also killed, spokesman Bjorn Edlund said from Zurich, Switzerland.

    Two American ABB-Lummus employees were wounded in the attack, one critically, he said. He wasn't sure how many others were wounded. Edlund said ABB employs hundreds of expatriates in Saudi Arabia and more than 50 Americans in Yanbu alone.

    ''It is obviously an enormous blow. Losing five employees in a terrorist attack is a terrible, terrible thing to happen,'' Edlund said. ''We are trying to deal with it as best as we can.''

    A spokeswoman from Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade identified the Australian killed in the attack as Anthony Richard Mason, 57, from the state of Western Australia.

    European diplomats, who confirmed the five Westerners had died, also said a member of the Saudi national guard was killed. A Saudi police captain was seriously wounded, the diplomats said on condition of anonymity. A Canadian diplomat in Riyadh said two Canadian citizens also were hospitalized, but the diplomat had no details on their condition.

    In Texas, Exxon Mobile spokesman Tom Cirigliano confirmed the company co-owns a petrochemical facility in Yanbu, but said he had no information about the attack. He said the facility was operating normally and that no Exxon Mobil employees were hurt.

    ''We abhor any violent attacks like this,'' he said.

    Saudi Arabia relies heavily on 6 million expatriate workers, including about 30,000 Americans, to run its oil industry and other sectors.

    The last attack that killed Americans in Saudi Arabia was in May 2003, when eight Americans were among 34 people killed in a series of coordinated suicide bombings in the capital, Riyadh. That attack and a November assault on a housing compound that killed 17 people were blamed on the al-Qaida terror network.

    Last month, the United States ordered the departure of nonessential U.S. government employees and family members from Saudi Arabia and also urged private citizens to depart. The embassy had warned of ''credible indications of terrorist threats aimed at American and Western interests in Saudi Arabia.''

    The U.S. Embassy official said the U.S. consulate in the Red Sea port city of Jiddah was following up the issue with Saudi authorities. Yanbu is about 220 miles northwest of Jiddah, also on the Red Sea.

    ''We are working with authorities to determine the facts,'' State Department spokeswoman Susan Pittman said from Washington.

    A Yanbu resident said by telephone that police had set up checkpoints throughout the city, and that some of the Westerners involved in the oil industry in Yanbu were unable to reach their workplaces because of the heavy police presence.

    The May 2003 housing compound attack was seen as a wake-up call to Saudis of the dangers of Islamic militants at home. Al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden was born and raised in the kingdom, but expelled in 1994 for agitating against the monarchy.

    Saudi security forces have been hunting Islamic militants, resulting in frequent deadly clashes in recent months.

    An American was also killed in a May 1, 2003, shooting attack at the King Abdul Aziz Naval base in Jubail, about 250 miles northeast of Riyadh. Few details about that shooting were released. The attacker, who was dressed in a Saudi navy uniform, escaped.


    05-01-04 1227EDT



  2. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ft Worth Tx ( North Richland Hills)
    Posts
    2,143
    We should use a small airburst nuke over Mecca. Just big enough to shatter every window in town, pop some ear drums, make some noses bleed. Really get their attention ya know? Then announce that if there is ONE more attrocity anywhere on the planet commited by Muslim terrorists ..The next nuke will be ALOT BIGGER and ALOT CLOSER!!!
    How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

  3. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    I normally dont critisize Bush

    He needs to be more aggressive in dealing with these subhuman misfits. It will turn into his Vietnam if he doesn't.

  4. #69
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Pekin, IL USA
    Posts
    700

    Re: I normally dont critisize Bush

    Originally posted by rob10
    He needs to be more aggressive in dealing with these subhuman misfits. It will turn into his Vietnam if he doesn't.
    Careful, rob. What you are writing is subversive, aiding and abetting, and pretty close to treasonous.

    Bush and Co. What a quagmire of a mess!

  5. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    And YES another reason



    Updated: 09:15 AM EDT
    Al-Qaida Claims U.S. Slaying and Hostage
    By DONNA ABU-NASR, AP



    Reuters
    A posting on the Sawt al Jihad Islamist Web site shows the passport of Paul Marshal Johnson from New Jersey.

    RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (June 13) - Authorities searched Sunday for an American apparently abducted by the same Islamic militants who claim to have killed another American shot in the back in the Saudi capital.

    The slaying and apparent abduction were the latest attacks in a campaign of anti-Western violence in the kingdom, believed by many to be aimed at driving out foreigners as a way to sabotage the vital Saudi oil sector.

    A purported al-Qaida statement posted on an Islamic Web site late Saturday said the terror group had killed one American and kidnapped another in Riyadh.

    The U.S. Embassy identified the dead man as Kenneth Scroggs. It did not identify the missing American but said it was working with Saudi officials to find him.

    Scroggs was the third Westerner killed in the kingdom in a week. Several Islamic Web sites Saturday carried links to a videotape - also purportedly from al-Qaida - that claims to show the killing of American Robert Jacobs, who was shot at his Riyadh home Tuesday.

    In the kidnapping claim, the al-Qaida statement showed a passport-size photo of a brown-haired man and a Lockheed Martin business card bearing the name Paul M. Johnson. It said he was born in 1955.

    The cell phone listed on the card was switched off, and a call to a second phone number was picked up by a voicemail message by a deep-voiced man who identified himself as Paul Johnson.

    The statement said the terror group would deal with Johnson just as "the Americans dealt with our brothers in Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib'' - a reference to sexual and other alleged abuses of Iraqi and Muslim prisoners by U.S. troops.

    The statement also said Johnson is one of four experts in Saudi Arabia working on developing Apache helicopter systems and that the American killed worked in the same industry. It did not identify the slain American but said he was killed at his house.

    "Everybody knows that these helicopters are used by the Americans, their Zionist allies and the apostates to kill Muslims, terrorizing them and displacing them in Palestine, Afghanistan and Iraq,'' said the statement.

    It said al-Qaida would release a videotape later to show Johnson's confessions and list its demands.

    A Lockheed Martin spokesman confirmed that Johnson was a Lockheed employee but declined to say what his job was or where he is from. The spokesman also said Lockheed Martin was not aware of any employees who had been killed in Saudi Arabia.

    A Saudi security source told The Associated Press that Scroggs worked for Advanced Electronics Co., a Saudi firm whose Web site lists Lockheed Martin among its customers. The office number on Johnson's business card was for Advanced Electronics.

    In Scroggs' neighborhood, the Malaz district of Riyadh, witnesses told AP that three militants first shot him in the back as he pulled his car into the garage. The militants then moved closer and fired more shots.

    The statement was signed by al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, the same group that claimed responsibility for a shooting and hostage-taking spree in the eastern Saudi city of Khobar on May 29-30. The attack at the hub of the Saudi oil industry killed 22 people, mostly foreign workers.

    The videotape that claims to show the "beheading of a Jewish American, Robert Jacobs'' was attributed to the same group.

    Jacobs, 62, of Murphysboro, Ill., worked for U.S. defense contractor Vinnell Corp.

    The video, less than two minutes long, does not show any faces. It begins with men running in a garage and a voice yelling in English, "No, no, please!'' A shot is fired, and the body of what appears to be a Western man falls to the ground. Two gunmen fire at least 10 more shots at the fallen man, then one kneels by his head and motions as if he is beheading him.

    A coworker found Jacobs shot in his home Tuesday, and Jacobs was taken to a hospital. There were no reports at the time that his killers attempted to behead him. There was no way to confirm the authenticity of the statements or the video.

    An estimated 8.8 million foreigners work among 17 million Saudis in the kingdom, mostly in the oil sector, banking and other high-level businesses.

    Militant attacks against Westerners, government targets and economic interests in the Saudi kingdom have surged in the past two months, despite a high-profile campaign against terrorists the government began after suicide bombings last year.

    Crown Prince Abdullah, shown on Saudi television Saturday greeting visitors at a Riyadh palace, urged his guests to ``inform me personally of anyone who has deviated from religion, attacked (it) or is an extremist.''

    "I pledge, God willing, ... that they (militants) will not slip away from the hand of justice,'' Abdullah said.

    U.S. Ambassador James C. Oberwetter, in a statement reacting to Saturday's killing and other recent terrorist attacks, expressed his condolences to victim's families.

    "Those Americans who choose to remain here should exercise the utmost caution as they go about their daily life,'' Oberwetter said.

    "I applaud Saudi Arabia's determination to bring an end to terrorism in the kingdom,'' he added.

    Speaking in London, Sheik Saleh bin Abdulaziz Al Sheik, the Saudi minister for Islamic affairs, said Saturday that despite the recent surge of attacks, terrorism in his country had not reached crisis proportions.

    "If you look back through the efforts of the Saudi government in tackling terrorism, they have destroyed half of the terrorist force,'' Al Sheik told journalists at the Saudi embassy in London.

    "Our assessment of the situation is that it is controllable, but because there are sleeping cells and because the terrorists live in a crowded area the Saudi forces do not want to hurt any of the local people,'' he said.

    Terror experts have noted that the militants are using several tactics - including shootings and ambushes where the gunmen do not die - rather than limiting themselves to suicide bombings or swift attacks under the cover of darkness.

    They are also trying to avoid killing Muslims. The death of several Muslims and Arabs in a November compound attack in Riyadh horrified many Muslims - something that could seriously affect recruiting efforts.

    Experts say the terrorists want to create "a psychosis of terror'' so foreigners will leave the country, the oil and defense sectors would suffer and the system would weaken.

    Last Sunday, an Irish cameraman was killed and a British TV correspondent was critically wounded when fired on while filming in a neighborhood that is home to many Islamic militants.

    The United States has urged all its citizens to leave the kingdom, and the British Foreign Office has advised Britons against all nonessential travel to Saudi Arabia.





  6. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    I quit counting



    Updated: 07:06 PM EDT
    Man Charged in Plot to Blow Up Ohio Mall
    By CURT ANDERSON, AP



    WASHINGTON (June 14) -- A Somali man has been charged with plotting to bomb an Ohio shopping mall, pursuing the type of vulnerable target in the nation's heartland that U.S. officials have been warning that terrorists want to strike.

    The four-count indictment returned by a grand jury in Columbus, Ohio, alleges that Nuradin Abdi conspired with convicted al-Qaida member Iyman Faris - an al-Qaida operative who sought to sabotage the Brooklyn Bridge - and others to detonate explosives at an unidentified mall in the Columbus area.

    Abdi, 32, was arrested at his Columbus apartment by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents Nov. 28, the day after Thanksgiving when malls across America were crowded with shoppers. Abdi, who operated a small cell phone business, had been under surveillance for months and initially was held on immigration violations, authorities said.

    Charges in the indictment, handed up Thursday and unsealed Monday, include providing material support to al-Qaida, conspiracy to provide material support and document fraud. If convicted on all charges, Abdi could be sentenced to a maximum of 80 years in prison.

    The FBI repeatedly has warned al-Qaida might shift away from attempting to hit tightly guarded installations, such as government buildings or nuclear plants, to more vulnerable targets such as malls, apartment buildings or hotels.

    Nuradin Abdi had been under surveillance for months and initially was held on immigration violations.

    Court papers filed by the government allege that a plot dated to March 2000 when Abdi returned from a terrorist training camp in Ethiopia to join Faris in Columbus. Attorney General John Ashcroft said the charges serve as a reminder that al-Qaida is determined ''to hit the United States and hit us hard.''

    ''We know our enemies will go to great lengths to lie in wait and to achieve the death and destruction they desire,'' he said at a news conference in Washington. He declined to say how far along authorities believe the plot was.

    Asa Hutchison, the top Homeland Security Department official for border and transportation security, attended the news conference because the department's bureau of Immigration, Customs and Enforcement was heavily involved in the case. Members of Congress of both parties criticized Ashcroft last month when he and FBI Director Robert Mueller held a news conference to describe a growing al-Qaida threat but did not invite Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge.

    Abdi's 17-year-old brother, Mohamed AbdiKarani, said his brother loved the freedom of the United States and never spoke out against the U.S. government. Abdi has a son and daughter and his wife is pregnant, his brother said.

    ''He really hated terrorists,'' AbdiKarani said. ''He loved it here. He never had as much freedom. He said it's good to raise his kids here.''

    AbdiKarani said Abdi was friends with Faris because they attended the same mosque. Columbus is home to more than 30,000 Somalis, the second-largest Somali community in the United States, after Minneapolis.

    Faris is serving a 20-year federal sentence after pleading guilty last June to providing material support to al-Qaida. Faris, an Ohio-based truck driver originally from Kashmir, admitted plotting to sever the cables supporting the Brooklyn Bridge in New York and to derail trains in New York or Washington. Neither of those plots came to fruition.

    Faris had received instructions from top al-Qaida leader Khalid Shaikh Mohammed for what might have been a second wave of attacks to follow those of Sept. 11, 2001, investigators say. Mohammed, the alleged mastermind of the hijackings, is in U.S. custody at an undisclosed overseas location.

    According to U.S. immigration records, Abdi first entered the United States in 1995, lived for a time in Ontario, Canada, and then returned to the United States in August 1997. Abdi was granted asylum in the United States as a refugee in January 1999 after giving false information to immigration officials, the government charges.

    Later that year, he used that refugee status to apply for a travel document by falsely claiming he was planning to visit Germany and the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia.


    In fact, prosecutors say, Abdi used the document to travel to Ogaden, Ethiopia, to obtain ''military-style training in preparation for violent jihad.'' The training included guns, guerrilla warfare, bombs and radio usage. One co-conspirator not in U.S. custody provided money for the trip, the indictment says.

    The part of Ethiopia referenced in the indictment is known as a remote and lawless region that shares a highly porous border with Somalia. It is believed that the Al-Ittihad Al-Islami terror network, which is affiliated with al-Qaida and is fighting the Ethiopian government, operates on both sides of the border in that area.

    Abdi returned to the United States in March 2000 - again using fraudulent documents, prosecutors say - and was met at the Columbus airport by Faris. The shopping mall plot was hatched a short time later, officials said, with one of the unidentified co-conspirators providing Abdi with bombmaking instruction.



  7. #72
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    Again



    Updated: 07:37 PM EDT
    Al-Qaida Threatens to Kill U.S. Hostage in Saudi Arabia
    By JASPER MORTIMER, AP


    CAIRO, Egypt (June 15) -- An Islamic Web site showed videotape Tuesday of a blindfolded American hostage in Saudi Arabia, and said abductors threatened to kill him unless Saudi authorities free al-Qaida prisoners within three days.

    Paul Johnson, 49, of Stafford Township, N.J., was abducted Saturday by a group calling itself al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. The organization is believed to be headed by al-Qaida's chief in the kingdom, Abdullah-aziz al-Moqrin, who was identified as speaking on the tape.

    ''My name is Paul Marshall Johnson, Jr.,'' the seated hostage says in the tape, an elaborate tattoo on his left shoulder. ''I am an American. ... I work on Apache helicopters.''

    Paul Johnson was abducted by a group calling itself al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula.

    A U.S. official said the threat should be taken ''very seriously'' because the posting appears to be credible and militants have used the site before. ''It has been a good indicator in the past,'' the official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

    The Web site was posted on the same day Saudi Arabia's ruling crown prince warned Islamic militants that the kingdom planned to deploy more security forces than they had ever faced before.

    ''Be assured that the kingdom has enough men whom you haven't seen so far, but within the coming few days you will see them,'' Crown Prince Abdullah told the militants, whose attacks have increased during the past three months. His remarks were televised.

    The tape on the Web site, http://www.hostinganime.com/sout18/ , showed a hooded man read a statement and holding an AK-47 rifle. As the man was reading, a subtitle on the screen identified him as al-Moqrin.

    His statement was similar to a printed message on the Web site that carried the name of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. It said the group gave Saudi authorities 72 hours - by Friday - to release ''mujahadeen'' militants or it would kill the hostage.

    Segments of the tape appeared to have been edited together and showed a blindfolded Johnson sitting in a chair with his profile to the camera. In one sequence, Johnson appeared to have a bandage around his neck, or a gag that had been pulled down from his mouth.

    The tape, which was first aired by CNN, also displayed his Lockheed Martin identification card.


    Adel al-Jubeir, foreign affairs adviser to the Saudi government, said shortly after the video appeared that the kingdom would consult with the Bush administration about how to continue, but Riyadh like Washington has a strict no-negotiation policy.

    ''We don't negotiate with terrorists. We don't negotiate with hostage-takers,'' al-Jubeir said in an interview on CNN.

    Al-Jubeir denounced the hostage-takers, but said it was premature to be able to verify any of the information on the video, saying, ''We can't simply go with what appears on Web sites.''

    ''It shows the cruel and inhumane face of the enemy we're dealing with,'' al-Jubeir said.


    The statement on the Web site says the holy warriors of the Arabian peninsula's Fallujah Brigade has ''hit'' the engineering team that ''oversees the development of the American Apache helicopter that attacks Muslims in Palestine and Afghanistan.''

    It says: ''The Fallujah Brigade has killed the director of this team and kidnapped one of its engineers, Paul Johnson, and if the tyrannical Saudi government wants their American master to be released, then they have to release our holy warriors that are held in Ha'ir, Ruweis and Alisha prisons within 72 hours of this statement's date or else we will sacrifice his blood to God in revenge for our Muslim brothers who have been liberally killed everywhere.''

    The day Johnson was seized, Islamic militants shot dead another American, Kenneth Scroggs, from Laconia, N.H., in his garage. Scroggs was the third Westerner killed in a week, after the shooting death of an Irish cameraman for the British Broadcasting Corp. on June 6 and another American who was killed in his garage June 8.

    Saudi security forces arrested a militant north of Riyadh on Tuesday as they stepped up their presence in and around the city in a hunt for Johnson's kidnappers.

    The Web site statement addressed Muslims all over the world, saying: ''We have made a promise to ourselves to defend you. We will not let you down, and you should know that the treacherous tyrants who have helped the Americans against you, and shared your blood with them, do not represent the Muslims of Saudi Arabia. They are our enemies as much as they are your enemies. They are the enemies of God and his prophet.''

    The militants have previously threatened to treat Johnson as U.S. troops treated Iraqi detainees, a reference to the month-old abuse controversy at Abu Ghraib prison.

    Members of Johnson's family, through a police officer stationed outside their home in Little Egg Harbor Township, N.J., declined an offer by CNN to view the video before it was aired. They could not immediately be reached for comment.

    On Monday, Johnson's son spoke to reporters about his father's love of Arabic culture. Paul Johnson III said his father once sent a copy of the Quran to his sister, with passages highlighted from the Islamic holy text that he felt were especially important.

    ''He felt he never had any fear for his safety and respects and honors their traditions and cultures,'' Johnson III said. ''Dad said many times he loved living in Saudi Arabia.''

    Westerners in Saudi Arabia are responding to the attacks by moving to high-security compounds or even to Bahrain, and by pushing for the right to armed private guards, according to diplomats and real estate agents.

    Western embassies in Riyadh, the Saudi capital, are negotiating with the government for a relaxation of the ban on private security guards carrying firearms, a Western diplomat said, speaking on condition of anonymity.


    06-15-04 19:19EDT




  8. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    Really bad



    Site Claims Police Helped in Abduction
    By SALAH NASRAWI, AP

    RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (June 21) - The al-Qaida group responsible for beheading an American engineer said sympathizers in the Saudi security forces provided police uniforms and cars used during the victim's kidnapping, according to an Islamic extremist Web site Sunday.

    The account of the abduction of Paul M. Johnson Jr., who was later decapitated, highlighted the fears expressed by some diplomats and Westerners in the kingdom that militants have infiltrated Saudi security forces - a possibility Saudi officials have denied.

    The article recounting the abduction appeared in Sawt al-Jihad, or Voice of the Holy War, a semimonthly Internet periodical posted by al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula - the group that claimed responsibility for killing Johnson.

    According to the account, militants wearing police uniforms and using police cars set up a fake checkpoint June 12 on al-Khadma Road, leading to the airport, near Imam Mohammed bin Saud University.

    "A number of the cooperators who are sincere to their religion in the security apparatus donated those clothes and the police cars. We ask God to reward them and that they use their energy to serve Islam and the mujahedeen,'' the article read.

    When Johnson's car approached the checkpoint, the militants stopped it, detained him, anesthetized him and carried him to another car, the article said. Earlier Saudi newspaper reports said Johnson was drugged during the kidnapping.

    In a separate article on the Web site, the leader of the al-Qaida cell behind the abduction, Abdulaziz al-Moqrin, justified the targeting of Johnson, pointing to his work on Apache attack helicopters for Lockheed Martin. Al-Moqrin and three other militants were killed Friday in a shootout with Saudi security forces hours after Johnson's death became known.

    Johnson "works for military aviation and he belongs to the American army, which kills, tortures and harms Muslims everywhere, which supports enemies (of Islam) in Palestine, Philippines, Kashmir,'' wrote al-Moqrin.

    On Sunday, police continued their search for Johnson's body and the militants involved in his death.

    "We are still combing through neighborhoods. And we hope that eventually we'll find the body and restore it to his family,'' Adel al-Jubeir, the foreign affairs adviser of Crown Prince Abdullah in Washington, said on CNN's "Late Edition.''

    Police cars, armored vehicles and a large contingent of emergency forces blockaded the al-Malaz area Sunday in a search for suspects, security officials said. Witnesses saw suspects fleeing into a house in the neighborhood after police fired at them at a traffic light.

    Hours later, the blockade was lifted and security forces left. It was unclear whether anyone was arrested.

    On Sunday night, scores of Saudi men, mostly in their 20s and 30s, paid visits to the gas station where al-Moqrin and the three others were killed.

    "This should be turned into a national monument,'' said Mohamed Ibrahim Shakir. "Every Saudi should come here and pray to God. We got rid of these terrorists.''

    The men counted more than two dozen bullet holes in the facade of the run-down shop. Shopkeeper Ibrahim al-Shamari said the militant leader was shooting at security forces from behind a refrigerator when he was killed.

    "Every Saudi should be proud of this. I should have brought my wife and children to see the end of this man,'' Khalil bin Othman said.

    One security officer was killed and two were wounded in the shootout, the official Saudi news agency reported.

    Al-Moqrin is believed to have had a leading role in the stepped-up campaign of militant violence in the kingdom, which in recent months has seen bombings and gun attacks on foreigners.

    Saudi King Fahd said Sunday that militants would not succeed in their aim to harm the kingdom.

    "The perpetrators of these attacks aimed at shaking stability and crippling security - and it is a far fetched aim, God willing,'' he said in a speech to the advisory Shura Council. "We will not allow this destructive bunch, led by deviant thought, to harm the security of this nation or affect its stability.''

    Johnson was seized June 12, the same day Islamic militants shot and killed Kenneth Scroggs of Laconia, N.N., in his garage in Riyadh. Earlier that week, militants in the capital also shot and killed Irish cameraman Simon Cumbers, who was filming for the British Broadcasting Corp., and another American, Robert Jacobs, of Murphysboro, Ill.

    Johnson's captors said they would kill him on Friday unless Saudi Arabia released jailed al-Qaida militants.

    Sunday's al-Qaida article said the militants decided to behead Johnson when Adel al-Jubeir, foreign affairs adviser to Crown Prince Abdullah in Washington, declared that Saudi Arabia would not negotiate with the kidnappers.

    "The stupid Saudi government took the initiative and announced by the Americanized tongue Adel Al-Jubeir that it will not submit to the conditions of the mujahedeen,'' the statement read.

    The group said it beheaded Johnson, 49, of Eagleswood Township, N.J., when its deadline expired Friday.

    Asked about the al-Qaida statement on CNN's "Late Edition,'' al-Jubeir said, "We have never negotiated with terrorists. We don't intend to do so.

    "I believe what the al-Qaida people were trying to do is trying to justify a murder that is unjustifiable under any faith or under any principle of humanity.''


    06/21/04 03:07 EDT

    Copyright 2004 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.


  9. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    Thumbs down Sickening



    Militants Kill South Korean Hostage in Iraq
    U.S. Launches Airstrikes on Building Used by Followers of Terrorist
    By TODD PITMAN, AP



    AP
    Kim Sun-il pleaded for his life in a video that Arab television aired Sunday.

    (June 22) -- Islamic militants beheaded a Korean hostage Tuesday after South Korea refused to cancel a troop deployment to Iraq, and the U.S. military launched an airstrike against a safehouse used by the kidnap group, which is led by the country's most wanted terrorist.

    Hostage Kim Sun-il died just hours after a go-between said the killing had been delayed and there were negotiations for his release.

    Hours later, the United States launched an airstrike in Fallujah building used by followers of Jordanian terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi - the second strike against the terror network in three days, the U.S. military said.

    Al-Zarqawi's Monotheism and Jihad movement was believed to be behind the beheading of Kim.


    The South Korean Foreign Ministry confirmed that Kim had been killed but did not say he was beheaded. However, Brig. Gen. Mark Kimmitt, coalition deputy operations chief, said the body of an Asian male was found west of Baghdad on Tuesday evening.

    ''It appears that the body had been thrown from a vehicle,'' Kimmitt said in a statement. ''The man had been beheaded, and the head was recovered with the body.''

    Kimmitt said the strike involved precision weapons to ''target and destroy'' the safehouse and was based on ''multiple confirmations of actionable intelligence.''

    Large explosions rocked the restive Sunni Muslim city west of Baghdad. Ambulances raced to the area after the 10:30 p.m. blasts. Wounded and dead were being evacuated, said Iraqi Police Col. Mekky Zeidan. Al-Jazeera TV reported that three people were killed and six were wounded.

    Kim's body was found by the U.S. military between Baghdad and Fallujah, 22 miles west of the capital, at 5:20 p.m. Iraq time, said South Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman Shin Bong-kil.


    Talk About It


    Chat
    Top News Boards

    After news of Kim's death broke, South Korean television showed Kim's distraught family members weeping and rocking back and forth with grief at their home in the southeastern port city of Busan.

    ''I don't want to die, I don't want to die,'' Kim pleaded in a first video released by his captors Sunday as he begged his government to end its involvement in Iraq.

    The South Korean embassy in Baghdad confirmed that the body was Kim's by studying a picture of the remains it received by e-mail, Shin said.

    ''It breaks our heart that we have to announce this unfortunate news,'' Shin said.

    Kim, 33, worked for Gana General Trading Co., a South Korean company supplying the U.S. military in Iraq. He was abducted last week, according to the South Korean government.

    The videotape of Kim, apparently made shortly before his death, showed him kneeling, blindfolded and wearing an orange jumpsuit similar to those issued to prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

    Five hooded men stood behind Kim, one reading a statement and gesturing with his right hand. Another captor had a big knife slipped in his belt.

    One of the masked men said the message was intended for the Korean people. ''This is what your hands have committed. Your army has not come here for the sake of Iraqis, but for cursed America.''

    The video as broadcast did not show Kim being executed.

    Al-Jazeera said the video claimed the execution was carried out by the al-Qaida-linked group Monotheism and Jihad.

    President Bush condemned the beheading of a South Korean hostage as ''barbaric'' Tuesday and said he remained confident that South Korea would go ahead with plans to send thousands of troops to Iraq.

    ''The free world cannot be intimidated by the brutal actions of these barbaric people,'' the president said.

    The grisly killing was reminiscent of the decapitation of American businessman Nicholas Berg, who was beheaded last month on a videotape posted on an Al-Qaida-linked Web site by the same group, which claimed responsibility for Kim's death.

    In Saudi Arabia, American helicopter technician Paul M. Johnson Jr., 49, was kidnapped by al-Qaida militants who followed through on a threat to kill him if the kingdom did not release its al-Qaida prisoners. An al-Qaida group claiming responsibility posted an Internet message that showed photographs of Johnson's severed head.

    Al-Jazeera did not say when Kim was killed.

    Kim's kidnappers had initially threatened to kill him at sundown Monday unless South Korea canceled a troop deployment to Iraq. The Seoul government rejected the demand, standing firm with plans to dispatch 3,000 soldiers starting in August.

    Kim Chun-ho, president of Gana General Trading, the company that employed the victim, were traveling to the site to collect the remains, Shin said.

    South Korea convened its National Security Council at 2 a.m. to discuss the government's reaction, Shin said. Later, the government reaffirmed it would send troops to Iraq as planned, but ordered all its nonessential civilians to leave Iraq as soon as possible.

    NKTS, a South Korean security firm doing business in Iraq, told the AP in Baghdad earlier Tuesday that Kim was still alive and that negotiations for his release continued, with the company president expected to arrive in Baghdad from Seoul by Wednesday.

    In a dispatch from Baghdad, South Korea's Yonhap news agency quoted an ''informed source'' as saying that negotiations with the kidnappers collapsed over the South Korean government's refusal to drop its plan to send troops.

    ''As a condition for starting negotiations for Kim's release, the kidnappers demanded that South Korea announce that it would retract its troop dispatch plan,'' the source was quoted as saying. ''This was a condition the South Korean government could not accept. As the talks bogged down, the kidnappers apparently resorted to an extreme measure.''

    Also Tuesday, gunmen opened fire on a U.S. military convoy north of the capital, killing two American soldiers and wounding a third, the military said.

    The convoy was attacked by small arms fire at 12:45 p.m. near Balad, 50 miles from Baghdad, the military said in a statement.

    U.S. officials, meanwhile, said they would hand legal custody of Saddam Hussein and an undetermined number of former regime figures to the interim government as soon as Iraqi courts issue warrants for their arrest and request the transfer.

    However, the United States will retain physical custody of Saddam and the prisoners, while giving Iraqi prosecutors and defense lawyers access to them, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

    A car bomb exploded in a Baghdad residential neighborhood near the international airport Tuesday, killing three people, including a 3-year-old girl, and wounding six other Iraqis, said Maj. Phil Smith, a U.S. military spokesman.

    U.S. troops sealed off the area after the late afternoon explosion, but neither American nor Iraqi security forces were in the area at the time of the blast, witnesses said. Three cars were burned and several shops were damaged in the Amiriya neighborhood.

    On Monday, a mortar attack in Baghdad and two assaults on U.S. forces northeast of the capital killed one soldier and wounded nine others, the military said, as militants showed no sign of easing their attacks ahead of next week's transfer of sovereignty.

    The recent abductions and attacks appear aimed at undermining the interim Iraqi government set to take power June 30, when the U.S.-led occupation formally ends.

    Coalition spokesman Dan Senor said that by week's end, all Iraqi government ministries would be under full Iraqi control.

    The coalition official who briefed reporters about the prisoner custody issue said the Americans will keep Saddam and others under U.S. guard even after the June 30 handover because the Iraqi government does not yet have capacity to hold such prisoners, the official said.

    U.S. troops captured Saddam in December near his hometown of Tikrit.

    U.S. authorities Tuesday released three busloads of prisoners from the notorious Abu Ghraib detention center, bringing the total number set free in the last two months to more than 2,000. The prison is at the center of a scandal over abuse of inmates by U.S. troops.


    06-22-04 17:19EDT

    Copyright 2004 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.


  10. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    Somebody please press the N button


    Search for
    Top News:

    Al-Jazeera Airs Tape of Marine Reportedly Held in Iraq
    By ROBERT H. REID, AP

    BAGHDAD, Iraq (June 27) - An Arab satellite TV network broadcast a videotape Sunday showing a blindfolded man in military fatigues and said he was a U.S. Marine taken
    There was no immediate comment from the U.S. military, but the video showed a card identifying the man by a Pakistani name and as an ''active duty'' Marine. The man had a trimmed moustache and his eyes were covered with a white blindfold.

    The Al-Jazeera network said the group claimed it infiltrated a Marine outpost, lured the man outside and abducted him. The station said the group demanded the release of all Iraqis ''in occupation jails'' or the man would be killed.

    The group identified itself as ''Islamic Response,'' the security wing of the ''1920 Revolution Brigades'' referring to the uprising against the British after World War I.

    Earlier Sunday, another Pakistani hostage was shown on a tape broadcast by a different Arab television station, Al-Arabiya. Four masked gunmen threatened to decapitate him if American troops don't release prisoners in several areas of central Iraq within the next three days.

    It was unclear how either set of kidnappers was linked to Jordanian terror mastermind Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who claimed responsibility for the decapitation deaths of American Nicholas Berg and South Korean Kim Sun-il last week.

    Also Sunday, Turkey refused demands by militants to cease business with Iraq's U.S. occupiers or three Turkish hostages would be decapitated.


    AP-NY-06-27-04 1618EDT

    Copyright 2004 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.


  11. #76
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,065

    Rob 10

    I guess the only reason we do not give those backwards, barbaric dickheads a taste of uranium is because we just cant bring ourselves to kill innocent men, women and children.

    I wonder where Truman found the nerve to bring WWII to an end?
    I pray not for an easy life but that I be a strong person.

  12. #77
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    Truman realized

    That to save American lives, a large amount of enemy non-combatants would have to die. Truman truly upheld his oath of President to defend the Constitution and its people. We don't have that same leadership in this day and age!!

  13. #78
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    9,871

    This **** has got to stop!!!



    Al-Jazeera: Militants Have Killed Soldier Held Hostage
    By JIM KRANE, AP

    BAGHDAD, Iraq (June 28) -- Iraqi militants killed an American soldier they have held hostage for nearly three months, saying the killing was because the U.S. government did not change its policy in Iraq, Al-Jazeera television reported Tuesday.

    Pfc. Keith Matthew Maupin was taken hostage in April.

    News of the killing of Spc. Keith M. Maupin, 20, of Batavia, Ohio, came hours after the United States returned sovereignty in Iraq to an interim government. The report did not say when Maupin was killed.

    Maupin was captured during an ambush on a convoy west of Baghdad on April 9.

    The Arab satellite station aired video showing a blindfolded man sitting on the ground. Al-Jazeera said that in the next scene, gunmen shoot the man in the back of the head, in front of a hole dug in the ground. It did not show the killing.

    Maj. Willie Harris, public affairs spokesman for the Army's 88th Regional Readiness Command, said the videotape is being analyzed by the Department of Defense.

    ''There is no confirmation at this time, that the tape contains footage of Matt Maupin or any other Army soldier,'' he said, adding that the Maupin family was briefed ''as to the existence of a videotape.''

    Al-Jazeera said a statement was issued with the video in the name of a group calling itself ''The Sharp Sword against the Enemies of God and His Prophet.'' In the statement, the militants said they killed the soldier because the United States did not change its policies in Iraq and to avenge ''martyrs'' in iraq, Saudi Arabia and Algeria.

    Maupin was among nine Americans, seven of them contractors, who disappeared after the April 9 attack.


    The bodies of four civilian employees of Kellogg Brown & Root - a subsidiary of Vice President Dick Cheney's former company Halliburton - were later found in a shallow grave near the site of the attack. The body of Sgt. Elmer Krause, of Greensboro, N.C. was later found.

    One civilian driver, Thomas Hamill of Macon, Miss, was kidnapped but escaped from his captors nearly a month later. The others are missing.

    Maupin was promoted in absentia on May 1 from private first class to the rank of specialist, said Maj. Mark Magalski, a spokesman for the 633rd QM Ballation, based in Cincinnati.


    06-28-04 18:51EDT

    Copyright 2004 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.


Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event