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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    60

    Chiller Training

    My company has recently taken on a few contracts with some chillers, with what we had before, there is now a few Carriers, tranes, mcquays and multi-stacks, but by far the most Carriers. The "Chiller techs" we have are about to retire real soon. My company has offered me the oppurtunity to take in some chiller training.

    My question to you guys, who offers the best training, is there somewhere that offers a generalized course. Or is it better to get the manufacturers training? Can anyone suggest a course to take?

    Any help is much appreciated

    Thanks a lot!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    SouthEastern Virginia
    Posts
    1,075
    Take a factory school from each manufacturer if possible. A screw is a screw and a centrifugal is a centrifugal. It is the chiller controls and starters that differ from one to another and in order to learn each, specialized training is required.
    It might get loud!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,174
    How is it working for Larry.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    I am unsure myself
    Posts
    1,116
    Quote Originally Posted by duke of earl View Post
    Take a factory school from each manufacturer if possible. A screw is a screw and a centrifugal is a centrifugal. It is the chiller controls and starters that differ from one to another and in order to learn each, specialized training is required.

    Uh I don't think so. I have pulled apart about 70 Tranes 4 McQuays 2 Yorks and 2 Carriers centrifugals that is and let me tell you they are nowhere near the same. Starters and controils are the easy part imo

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Windsor, Ont.
    Posts
    489
    Factory schooling is good if you can get it. Some of them or at least 1 I can think of don't think you need to know service level passwords and try to keep them secret. I went to the Entech 1 week course in Texas for their microprocessors last year and would certainly reccomend it as it covers the 4 major manufacturers and isn't biased 1 way or the other. They also offer teardown courses.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    530
    Quote Originally Posted by mustardman View Post
    Uh I don't think so. I have pulled apart about 70 Tranes 4 McQuays 2 Yorks and 2 Carriers centrifugals that is and let me tell you they are nowhere near the same. Starters and controils are the easy part imo
    x2

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    SouthEastern Virginia
    Posts
    1,075
    The dynamics of a centrifugal compressor are all the same. They all work basically the same way. Some are bigger, some smaller. some run at 3600 rpm, some run at high speeds, some are oiless,some have oil management systems. They all have impeller wheels that draw refrigerant vapor into the wheels and compress the gas into discharge volutes. now how does that change from one manufacturer to another? The controls are the biggest difference period.
    It might get loud!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Surrey BC
    Posts
    118
    Hey Duke

    So with all the items you have listed how are they the similiar? How about the fact that trane uses a closed wheel where carrier uses an open wheel. Basically all you are saying is a compressor is a compressor period.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,876
    Centrifugal force, spin that sucker up. How the compressor is made has more to do with operating characteristics.

    Not that I know anything about compressors but I did look into centrifugal fan design at one time. Part basic physics, part aerodynamics (actually fluid dynamics but that scares people away more than saying it operates somewhat like a wing.) that determines the shape of the pressure/capacity curves.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    4,356
    Carrier centrifugal courses look to be canceled for some reason. However, you can still attend the screw class. Big bucks. You have to talk the boss into it. Good luck.

    http://www.new.hvacpartners.com/partnerportal/home.aspx

    Largest centrifugals in the world are produced by Mother Nature. Study up on typhoons and hurricanes.
    "Excellence is the gradual result of always striving to do better"
    -Pat Riley

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,876
    Quote Originally Posted by whec720 View Post
    Carrier centrifugal courses look to be canceled for some reason. However, you can still attend the screw class. Big bucks. You have to talk the boss into it. Good luck.

    http://www.new.hvacpartners.com/partnerportal/home.aspx

    Largest centrifugals in the world are produced by Mother Nature. Study up on typhoons and hurricanes.
    With built in humidifiers.

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