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  1. #1
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    Sep 2008
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    Sales vs Trubleshooting, diagnostic and repair

    my question is this! what is more important to a service tech, sales or troubleshooting skills ? our new office manager interviewed several guys last week for a service tech position, while doing my take offs I heard the office manager dogging the techs on their sales abilities not so much on troubloshooting and repair skills, when asked why he was doing this ! his answer was!! sales is more importants than troubleshooting and repairs skill for a service tech, what do ya think,,, honestly?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baja500 View Post
    my question is this! what is more important to a service tech, sales or troubleshooting skills ? our new office manager interviewed several guys last week for a service tech position, while doing my take offs I heard the office manager dogging the techs on their sales abilities not so much on troubloshooting and repair skills, when asked why he was doing this ! his answer was!! sales is more importants than troubleshooting and repairs skill for a service tech, what do ya think,,, honestly?
    I think with the economy you better be ready and able to repair more than sell. The sell of equipment will come when the repair out weighs the equipment sell. I love to sell equipment, I love even more to repair equipment the last guy said could not be fixed.
    It's refreshing to pull your head out of the box when servicing a system.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2008
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    I think your new office manager is an idiot, to be blunt. (Feel free to print this and show it to him, if you'd like.)

    Sales ability is unimportant for someone whose job centers around being able to correctly diagnose and repair problems with equipment. That's not to say that a mechanic can be a horses butt and get the job done correctly. As long as that mechanic has a good "bedside manner" with the customers, his work will sell itself if he's a good tech, and street credibility will create more sales opportunities than anything else he can have. If your new idiot wants salesmen, why's he interviewin' mechanics? Do you possibly work for a company that tries to sell things that don't really need to be sold, just for the sake of increased profit margins?

  4. #4
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    Why would he not send some of his current techs to sales training? This would be the best answer I would think.
    It's refreshing to pull your head out of the box when servicing a system.

  5. #5
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    Dec 2003
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    Middle of Florida
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    2,159
    Unfortunately you have to be both sales and tech savey in today's A/C. commercial and residential.
    If common sense is so common how come so few of us have it!

  6. #6
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    A service tech is a salesman. I sell my services to every customer I meet. The problem most techs have is being able to sell things other than the broken part that needs replaced. Most techs feel that if they replace the contactor on a 30 year old condenser, charge them for the service call and the contactor, their doing a favor for the customer even though the coils completely clogged, the ductwork is leaking air, the ah leaking refrigerant and the drain pan leaks into the crawl space. To me that’s not helping the customer, helping the customer would be explaining all the problems with the system and offering a solution.
    And techs also have to remember that this is a business. What’s the difference between McDonalds asking you if you would like to try an apple pie and me asking a customer to buy a humidifier?

  7. #7
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by klove View Post
    I think your new office manager is an idiot, to be blunt. (Feel free to print this and show it to him, if you'd like.)

    Sales ability is unimportant for someone whose job centers around being able to correctly diagnose and repair problems with equipment. That's not to say that a mechanic can be a horses butt and get the job done correctly. As long as that mechanic has a good "bedside manner" with the customers, his work will sell itself if he's a good tech, and street credibility will create more sales opportunities than anything else he can have. If your new idiot wants salesmen, why's he interviewin' mechanics? Do you possibly work for a company that tries to sell things that don't really need to be sold, just for the sake of increased profit margins?
    I can't call him that,, but he will see this!!!! He is my partner son so I need to be gentle not the mean Baja,,, lol

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by clintkennon View Post
    What’s the difference between McDonalds asking you if you would like to try an apple pie and me asking a customer to buy a humidifier?
    Apple pie tastes better.
    If common sense is so common how come so few of us have it!

  9. #9
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    Sep 2008
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    Sure.

    Sales is more important. If you can't fix it in 10 minutes, just sell them a new one.

    That works in supermarkets ALL the time.

  10. #10
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    Dec 2008
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    Dixiana, AL
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    Quote Originally Posted by clintkennon View Post
    A service tech is a salesman. I sell my services to every customer I meet. The problem most techs have is being able to sell things other than the broken part that needs replaced. Most techs feel that if they replace the contactor on a 30 year old condenser, charge them for the service call and the contactor, their doing a favor for the customer even though the coils completely clogged, the ductwork is leaking air, the ah leaking refrigerant and the drain pan leaks into the crawl space. To me that’s not helping the customer, helping the customer would be explaining all the problems with the system and offering a solution.
    And techs also have to remember that this is a business. What’s the difference between McDonalds asking you if you would like to try an apple pie and me asking a customer to buy a humidifier?
    No truer words were ever spoken than these. They're saying the same thing that I mentioned earlier when I stated that having a good rapport with the customers and being street credible with your knowledge of what does and does not need to be done will create real sales opportunities, not a way to get someone to buy something that they don't need. Nothing at all is wrong with pointing out the deficiencies within a system and recommending the best thing to resolve those deficiencies, and if your customer has the confidence that you are a subject matter expert that also has their best interest at heart, it'll sell itself. But the first thing that has to happen is that you have to prove to them that you are a subject matter expert, and the best way to do that is to be one.


    p.s. Do I detect a note of sarcasm there, JP?

  11. #11
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  12. #12
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    Jan 2010
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    In a Pineapple Under the Sea
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    As far as diagnostic and troubleshooting skills, guys that can do and those who can't change parts.

    Those who honed their skills in this field have worked hard over years to do so and I believe they are an invalueable asset to their employer. Get in and get out, fix it right the first time, no call backs or customer complaints. There is nothing like walking into a customer's business when the crap is hitting the fan and seeing the reilef on their face as they see you walk in the door. They trust and respect your abilities from you being honest with them and providing them with good quality service throughout the years. Thats better than them thinking your gonna screw them over and try to sell them something they don't need any day.

    But then again what do I know, I have prided myself in this thinking for 30 years now but find myself out of work now. Previous employer was all about sales, even the service manager was a salesman and completely clueless about the field. Been there 7 years had an established customer base, new service manager hires a parts changer from the place he use to work in the fall. Customers complain about him but it falls on deaf ears and he lays me off. I am still going to stick to my guns until this all turns around and hopefully soon.

  13. #13
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    There is nothing like walking into a customer's business when the crap is hitting the fan and seeing the reilef on their face as they see you walk in the door.
    Well said.

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