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  1. #1
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    Jul 2007
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    Honeywell TH8320U1016 VS Lennox Comfortsense 7000

    I am in process of having installed a Lennox furnace and heat pump, G71MPP furnace + XP15 heat pump, no humidifier. When I asked I was told it would come with a Lennox Comfortsense 7000 t-stat, I came home tonight to see a Honeywell Visionpro TH8320U1016 on the wall. So, I am wondering what the difference is, and what, if any effect it will have on expected performance of this system?

    There are a few threads that ask similar questions, but I didn't want to hi-jack, and there are some differences in situations, so hope this isn't too repetitive!

    Thanks in advance....

    Chris

  2. #2
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    Dec 2007
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    4,709
    find out what you were quoted cost wise, one may be more expensive than the other.

    the 7000 is more feature packed and stage specific on timing.

    if they have not installed one before it can be confusing.

    ask why that stat over the other and listen carefully to explanation.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2007
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    Interior BC, Canada
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    Thanks for your response pacnw! The quote didn't specify, when I emailed for clarification I was told the Lennox Comfortsense 7000, the installer has no problem with changing it, but felt the Honeywell VisionPro8321 was preferred.

    The explanation was that between the 2 the Lennox Comfortsense 7000 one would automatically turn to heat or cooling if ambient temps changed from what was set, ie would call for cooling if the temp rose above what was set, if the fireplace brought the temp up past what was set for example. Can't figure why the heat pump would change modes like that to keep the temps stable, after all, setting the temp back before going out would cause the same thing?? The other reason was battery backup, which this one has, but the Lennox one has a non volatile memory for settings and a l-ion battery for the clock, so.... When he explained it, it sounded a lot more reasonable than what I just wrote

    Can you explain stage specific please? or send me to a place where I can get a clue? lol

  4. #4
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    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airfun View Post
    Thanks for your response pacnw! The quote didn't specify, when I emailed for clarification I was told the Lennox Comfortsense 7000, the installer has no problem with changing it, but felt the Honeywell VisionPro8321 was preferred.

    The explanation was that between the 2 the Lennox Comfortsense 7000 one would automatically turn to heat or cooling if ambient temps changed from what was set, ie would call for cooling if the temp rose above what was set, if the fireplace brought the temp up past what was set for example. Can't figure why the heat pump would change modes like that to keep the temps stable, after all, setting the temp back before going out would cause the same thing?? they both will do this, if I understand the comment. just put the system in the AUTO mode.The other reason was battery backup, which this one has, but the Lennox one has a non volatile memory for settings and a l-ion battery for the clock, so....and what does the battery back-up do that the 7000 does NOT do? When he explained it, it sounded a lot more reasonable than what I just wrote

    Can you explain stage specific please? or send me to a place where I can get a clue? lol
    I also believe the 7000 can be fine tuned more than the 8000 as far as when the stages change.

    it does sound like they are not quite sure of the capabilities of the 7000 and I might say changing to it may cause more issues than it is worth. You would have to be the judge of that.

  5. #5
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    Jul 2007
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    Interior BC, Canada
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    Do you mean then that if it (the Lennox CS 7000) is in auto mode it wouldn't call for cooling in my example with the fireplace? The installers preference was that the VP8321 could have that call for cooling to bring the temp down to the set point switched off and the Lennox could not.

    The battery aspect, well, if there was no battery backup with the Lennox, that could be a benefit to keeping the Honeywell as the power does go out enough to be annoying, but when I looked in the Lennox manual, it does retain the settings, so it's irrelevant.

    A lot of my problem in weighing the pros and cons is that I don't know what I am getting and/or missing, when I get a tidbit of info, I can go looking and gain some knowledge, but at this point I don't even know what I am looking for to compare. I am getting the impression from reading different forum posts that the Honeywell is not going to enable me to get the best benefit out of this system, I bought it for the benefits, so I know, I have a pile of learning to do It won't be more trouble than it's worth to get the right equipment to start, better that than find out I ok'd something now that I realize later isn't meeting my expectations.

    If this was buying a camera,lens, shrub, tree I'd know how to compare all the aspects that are important to me, AND know what's important to me! but in this case, I'm still learning the basics - it's not just light the pilot light and move the lever on the thermostat anymore (and yeahaw for that!).

    Thanks again

    Chris

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airfun View Post
    Do you mean then that if it (the Lennox CS 7000) is in auto mode it wouldn't call for cooling in my example with the fireplace? The installers preference was that the VP8321 could have that call for cooling to bring the temp down to the set point switched off and the Lennox could not.on BOTH of these stats, there are modes/system selections. if you select"AUTO" it will switch between heat and cool as per the set points. if in heat OR cool mode, it will only do that function. function wise both stats will do the same, with the 7000 being more specialized/customizable.

    The battery aspect, well, if there was no battery backup with the Lennox, that could be a benefit to keeping the Honeywell as the power does go out enough to be annoying, but when I looked in the Lennox manual, it does retain the settings, so it's irrelevant.yes/correct, irrelevant!!

    A lot of my problem in weighing the pros and cons is that I don't know what I am getting and/or missing, when I get a tidbit of info, I can go looking and gain some knowledge, but at this point I don't even know what I am looking for to compare. I am getting the impression from reading different forum posts that the Honeywell is not going to enable me to get the best benefit out of this system, I bought it for the benefits, so I know, I have a pile of learning to do It won't be more trouble than it's worth to get the right equipment to start, better that than find out I ok'd something now that I realize later isn't meeting my expectations.

    If this was buying a camera,lens, shrub, tree I'd know how to compare all the aspects that are important to me, AND know what's important to me! but in this case, I'm still learning the basics - it's not just light the pilot light and move the lever on the thermostat anymore (and yeahaw for that!).

    Thanks again

    Chris
    if they will give you the 7000 for nothing, then do it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    59
    See, that's what I don't get is why the installers don't read the manual before stating these things as facts.

    I had Honeywell RTH7600 and in auto mode it worked according to schedule. The schedule said to heat to 72 degrees and to cool to 76 degrees. If the temp rose above 72 it wouldn't turn the system on, heck it could be 76 when I had thanksgiving cooking going on, it wouldn't turn the system on too cool it. If it got to 77 (never did cause I cracked open the windows) then it would turn the system on to cool the house.

    Maybe it would turn to cooling if you did not run in schedule but rather if you ran in permanent hold mode. But in schedule mode the best method to use is automatic. Hope that helps.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dandar View Post
    See, that's what I don't get is why the installers don't read the manual before stating these things as facts.

    I had Honeywell RTH7600 and in auto mode it worked according to schedule. The schedule said to heat to 72 degrees and to cool to 76 degrees. If the temp rose above 72 it wouldn't turn the system on, heck it could be 76 when I had thanksgiving cooking going on, it wouldn't turn the system on too cool it.that is CORRECT functioning of the stat! If it got to 77 (never did cause I cracked open the windows) then it would turn the system on to cool the house.

    Maybe it would turn to cooling if you did not run in schedule but rather if you ran in permanent hold mode. But in schedule mode the best method to use is automatic. Hope that helps.
    .

  9. #9
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacnw View Post
    that is CORRECT functioning of the stat!
    I know. That's what I'm saying. The installers though keep telling people that in auto if you're cooking and the temp goes up the t-stat will turn on A/C. That's simply not true. There is a range you set in schedule mode and if you're in that range the system will stay off.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dandar View Post
    I know. That's what I'm saying. The installers though keep telling people that in auto if you're cooking and the temp goes up the t-stat will turn on A/C. That's simply not true. There is a range you set in schedule mode and if you're in that range the system will stay off.
    I am not sure we are talking the same thing, this is not a set up/installer setting thing, it is a user programming setting.

  11. #11
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    Interior BC, Canada
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    It may not be installer settings, but the installer is stating a restriction of what the thermostat will do that I'm thinking doesn't exist as the problem they are stating it is. Wow, I know that doesn't make sense! From what I can gather in the manuals for both, and what you wrote pacnw - the heat/cool temps are decided by the user - for either thermostat, if the heat vs cool temps are far enough apart the issue that was put to me doesn't exist - no worries that the fireplace is going to cause the heat pump to cool or anything like that.

    I have to clarify what I was told, because what I was told just doesn't make sense now.....

    Chris

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    523
    I would prefer the CS7000. It has de humidify options that your furnace can utilize. Only problem with it is the amount of conductors required to get all the functions out of it. You'll need an 11 conductor thermostat wire to hook up every option/feature. 12 if you ever got a humidifier.

    Then the furnace basically needs to be configured for the thermostat. So its more then just popping a stat on the wall.

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