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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    8

    This Gal needs heat for her shop

    Hey guys, I'm totally new here so I've come to ask for some advice. First a little background info. I have a small woodworking business and I'm currently building a new shop behind my home. It'll be around 1132 sq. feet. It's basically a 4 stall garage with the middle portion (2 stalls worth) having cathedral ceilings at about 14' high. The two outer stalls will have 9' ceilings. My walls are 2 x 6 with R19 insulation and the ceilings will have R38 insulation. I decided to insulate under my slab of concrete - some say that's not necessary but I've talk to many guys who said it will help keep the place warmer.
    My insurance company said they'd approve a wood burning stove as long as it's professionally installed. I'm well aware of the work that's involved with the stove (cutting, hauling, stacking wood) so this is something I'll have to weigh as I make my final decision. I've also looked into a heating/cooling forced air system too. If I decide on the stove option is there something I could add along with the stove to keep the temprature at say 50 when the fire goes out or before I could add more wood? My time in the building is limited at times as I lost my husband last year to cancer and am left to raise 2 young boys on my own. Depending on their activities there may be days when I'm not able to spend time in there. I kind of hate to spend 6K for a forced air system when it's just a small time business/hobby shop.
    I've looked into a PTAC unit but I worry one of those wouldn't be big enough for that size of shop, especially the AC part of it. I'd love to hear your suggestions if you have any. Thanks in advance!

    Almost forgot...I live in Central Iowa.
    Last edited by The WoodGal; 01-23-2010 at 10:31 AM. Reason: Removed price

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    97
    I'd shop around for a cheaper forced air install, K is way to high for that size of shop. Good Luck P.S outside wood furnace another option for heat.
    Last edited by beenthere; 01-22-2010 at 11:42 PM. Reason: Removed price

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    6,696
    If heat was all I was worried about Id just buy an electric or gas furnace and set it in a central location of the shop with minimal ductwork. No AC.

    Or you could add ac to it also but you seem more concerned with heating.

    Anyhow... you need to get plenty of free estimates. Ask friends, neighbors, coworkers etc... for info on their heating and air guys and find one who comes highly recommended.

    Also let the people giving you estimates lay out several different scenarios for you..... heat only...not a lot of ductwork..... to say a more elaborate system with cooling.

    Ive seen a lot of situations where they is just a furnace sitting in a corner with a few feet of duct on top of it blowing the air out in a couple of different directions. Usually sitting on a metal plenum box with a place for the filter and grille to keep junk out of it.

    Whatever you decide on....if you go forced air you need to make sure and have your return to the furnace sealed up good so that no sawdust or other dust can get into furnace and collect on the heaters, any ac coils....or the fan itself..
    "I believe this is a sovereign state of Nevada, I abide by all of Nevada state laws. But I don't recognize the United States government as even existing."

    Cliven Bundy.... Patriot ???

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold.calm
    Posts
    4,856
    Im surprised the insurance company would allow any open flames in a wood working shop. Between the dust and volatile chemicals Its a potential accident waiting to happen but thats there call

    Because of the dust and chemicals any forced air unit will develop problems down the road. Changing filters almost daily, cleaning the unit once or twice a year. That dust will get past the filter and shorten the life of the equipment. Personally I would consider in floor radiant tubing with a boiler outside of the work area. A bit pricy up front but the maintenance costs down the road will more then make up for it. No dust and chemicals getting into the heat exchanger plus standing on a warm floor is much easier then cold concert.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,260
    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    Im surprised the insurance company would allow any open flames in a wood working shop. Between the dust and volatile chemicals Its a potential accident waiting to happen but thats there call

    Because of the dust and chemicals any forced air unit will develop problems down the road. Changing filters almost daily, cleaning the unit once or twice a year. That dust will get past the filter and shorten the life of the equipment. Personally I would consider in floor radiant tubing with a boiler outside of the work area. A bit pricy up front but the maintenance costs down the road will more then make up for it. No dust and chemicals getting into the heat exchanger plus standing on a warm floor is much easier then cold concert.
    I'll second that and add that you could easily have a hydro air coil(outdoor boiler sends hot water through a radiator with a fan blowing across it) and this way it is easy to add AC later. Minimal duct and you can find all sorts of options for dual fuel outdoor boilers
    I r the king of the world!...or at least I get to stand on the roof and look down on the rest of yall

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    12,896
    Twilli says you've got to love a gal that works with wood. Twilli says that is a lost art.
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    16,158
    Quote Originally Posted by twilli3967 View Post
    Twilli says you've got to love a gal that works with wood. Twilli says that is a lost art.


    Once again Twilli is guilty of double entendre.



    Moved to the "Residential Forum" where it belongs.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    3,823
    In a woodworking shop you need to be careful. Of cousre from the perspective of safety, but your wallet as well. The chemical reaction that happens when a flame/heat mixes with glue, varnish, paint will rot out the heat exchanger very fast.
    Always here

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    duct in a split system heat pump with electric backup

    no need to chop or buy wood "ever"



    .

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    1,213
    Using a forced air system in a woodwork shop is not advisable..... moving air picks up the wood dust & will cause issues with your finished product. Much better to use floor or ceiling radiant. You will have 4 small zones (apparently) that can be controlled independently if required. A boiler of choice (electric/gas/oil, or outdoor wood) can be used. Alternate option is radiant tube heaters (gas/oil). AC is perhaps an add-on for later, as required.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by Moose View Post
    Using a forced air system in a woodwork shop is not advisable..... moving air picks up the wood dust & will cause issues with your finished product.
    good point;

    however, a good vacuum system should be a part of any wood shop

    also a paint/varnish room is usually appropriate and would avoid the issues you bring up

    that being said, a "special" air filtration set-up would be advised with a forced air system



    .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    122

    Talking Heating options

    WoodGal,

    There are many woodworking web sites out there that have discussions or articles on heating a wood shop. Some of these include plans for installation. Being in the business you may already be familiar with some of these, "woodweb" "finewoodworking" "lumberjocks" (No disrespect intended) There are a lot of others as well. I hope this will give you some insight and/or helpful information. Good luck. ibis1

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Fox Lake IL
    Posts
    428
    My vote is infloor heat.that is you have not poured the floor yet. add ptac for ac

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