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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    5,491
    I knew a guy once that spent time in a Fla prison for auto theft. While there the old timers took him under their wing and taught safe cracking 101.
    Something about getting the knob off and drilling some brass do dads.
    It's good to know one can spend their prison time and still learning a trade.
    Tracers work both ways.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    1,241
    Lock picking and safe cracking have been a hobby of mine for a long time. I own lots of odd and high security locks and lots of opening tools. I even entered one of the major lock picking competitions a couple of years ago but was knocked out in the second round. Yes, there are lock picking competitions and some very unusual skills there.

    Once a combination lock has seized up, it's pretty unlikely that you'll be able to open it by operating the lock.

    If the lock's working, it's really pretty simple to open most safes. Most can be manipulated and almost all others can be drilled in some spot that lets the locksmith see the positions of the lock wheels.

    Now the catch is that you might need a drill bit or a couple of drill bits made to drill hard plate steel and you might need a drilling rig designed to apply enough pressure to the bit to cut hardplate. An angled bore scope might also be needed to see what you need to see and knowing where to drill is important and drill points are usually in about the same spot but you really need to know which exact lock is installed on the inside of the door and which position it is in to be sure. Safemen will have the reference books that tell them this for each safe.

    If the lock is damaged, and it sounds like yours is, there might be a whole differnt approach too, including resetting or drilling out relockers (devices that jamb a lock if a break in is attempted), driving back the bolts, and other stuff. Again, you really need to know where all this stuff is EXACTLY for your specific safe.

    If this was my safe, I would tackle this myself just for the fun if I didn't mind if I ruined the safe but if you want to safe the safe, hire a safeman.
    Ryan
    Maintenance Guy
    -----------------
    naysayer, skeptic, conspiracy theorist

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,863
    Quote Originally Posted by maintenanceguy View Post
    Lock picking and safe cracking have been a hobby of mine for a long time. I own lots of odd and high security locks and lots of opening tools. I even entered one of the major lock picking competitions a couple of years ago but was knocked out in the second round. Yes, there are lock picking competitions and some very unusual skills there.

    Once a combination lock has seized up, it's pretty unlikely that you'll be able to open it by operating the lock.

    If the lock's working, it's really pretty simple to open most safes. Most can be manipulated and almost all others can be drilled in some spot that lets the locksmith see the positions of the lock wheels.

    Now the catch is that you might need a drill bit or a couple of drill bits made to drill hard plate steel and you might need a drilling rig designed to apply enough pressure to the bit to cut hardplate. An angled bore scope might also be needed to see what you need to see and knowing where to drill is important and drill points are usually in about the same spot but you really need to know which exact lock is installed on the inside of the door and which position it is in to be sure. Safemen will have the reference books that tell them this for each safe.

    If the lock is damaged, and it sounds like yours is, there might be a whole differnt approach too, including resetting or drilling out relockers (devices that jamb a lock if a break in is attempted), driving back the bolts, and other stuff. Again, you really need to know where all this stuff is EXACTLY for your specific safe.

    If this was my safe, I would tackle this myself just for the fun if I didn't mind if I ruined the safe but if you want to safe the safe, hire a safeman.




    Good advice. I've got an older (1960's) round door Diebold.60" tall 53" wide & 30" deep, this thing is BIG.(And heavy!) There were only two guys in town that had the "key" to reset the combination. I remember seeing the guts of it when they changed the numbers. Not something for DIY. The smith told me if the door was locked, it was pretty much a boat anchor. I think they quoted around $800 if they had to drill it out. And that was ten years ago.
    I've got an old Mosler too. Changing the numbers on that one isn't quite as bad. But, it is a job for the pro. They also told me, that the mechanical lock, is safer than the electronic locks. Said a good computer hacker could probably open it in a short time.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    las vegas
    Posts
    1,505
    this safe was drilled about 20 years ago & not re welded
    have made an appt. with safe man for wed. he thinks he can be into it in about an hour with my knowing the combo.

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