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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Skokie , IL near chicago
    Posts
    1,118

    regulator springs

    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    I would think that any spring would be fully compressed with the adjuster screwed all the way down. I could be wrong though.

    New one works great.
    the springs i was referring to are the different colored springs that you specify to be in that reg. when you buy it to match the inlet pressure and the cfh needed to match the firing rate of the unit attached to the reg. the reg was prob. bottomed out to get more pressure to the unit & the reg may not have had the right spring installed. check out the maxitrol website to download a spring chart for all their regs..........Jack

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    16,998
    Quote Originally Posted by rojacman View Post
    the springs i was referring to are the different colored springs that you specify to be in that reg. when you buy it to match the inlet pressure and the cfh needed to match the firing rate of the unit attached to the reg. the reg was prob. bottomed out to get more pressure to the unit & the reg may not have had the right spring installed. check out the maxitrol website to download a spring chart for all their regs..........Jack
    I'll have to download that chart for future reference.

    It seems counter-intuitive that the identity of a fully compressed spring could make a difference in the output of the regulator.

    I kept the thing, so now I'll have to grind off the rivets and open the thing up.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Skokie , IL near chicago
    Posts
    1,118

    Talking springs for gas regulators

    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    I'll have to download that chart for future reference.

    It seems counter-intuitive that the identity of a fully compressed spring could make a difference in the output of the regulator.

    I kept the thing, so now I'll have to grind off the rivets and open the thing up.
    if you will check out the various springs available you'll find they all have different colors for identity and they vary in their individual tension from very weak to very strong depending on how hard they have to push down on the diaphragm. no grinding needed , just remove the adjusting screw from the top of the reg & you'll see the spring is right under there............Jack

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Raleigh N.C.
    Posts
    263
    Belive it or not have actualy seen regulators under water on a roof "makin bathtub bubbles"
    Damn phosgene

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    16,998
    Quote Originally Posted by rojacman View Post
    if you will check out the various springs available you'll find they all have different colors for identity and they vary in their individual tension from very weak to very strong depending on how hard they have to push down on the diaphragm. no grinding needed , just remove the adjusting screw from the top of the reg & you'll see the spring is right under there............Jack
    I'm unclear. My bad.

    I know where the spring lives and how it is replaced. What I don't know is the manner of failure of the old regulator, in that it would not passs more than a trickle of gas with with the spring screwed all the way down.

    Both of the values listed for this regulator cover the desired output pressure, so we shopuld be good. I did not have to bottom out on the adjustment to get the pressure I wanted.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  6. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    278
    so i assume that no one ever pulled a permit when they installed that?
    If you can not do it right, Why even do it at all?

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    16,998
    Quote Originally Posted by luv2cruiserccl View Post
    so i assume that no one ever pulled a permit when they installed that?
    It's an upscale strip mall installed about six years ago. Maybe 60 units.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    DuPage County, IL
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    So, I get it all back together, and I'm ready for the burn-off. On the initial visit, the unit had fired, but not well. Due to the bad HX, it could not be operated long enough to fully delve into whatever problems might be present.

    I get out the Testo and find the gas pressure to the unit is not what it should be.

    I look at the regulator, and find the setting was screwed down ALL the way, in an effort to get more gas into the unit.

    Now, it has a nice new one. Not screwed down to the bottom, either.

    Attachment 69462

    Maybe these guys are a necessary part of the industry, to keep the rest of us working. It still bothers me, though.
    I thought vent limiters were for indoor use only. Shouldn't there be a goose neck on that regulator vent instead. Or better yet, Maxitrol now makes rubber regulator caps which around here, have greatly helped keep moisture from getting in and freezing up the regs
    Figman

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,050

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by german 8'er View Post
    I thought vent limiters were for indoor use only. Shouldn't there be a goose neck on that regulator vent instead. Or better yet, Maxitrol now makes rubber regulator caps which around here, have greatly helped keep moisture from getting in and freezing up the regs
    From Maxitrol:
    NOTE: Vent limiters are designed for use indoors and in
    spaces where limiting the amount of gas escapement due to
    diaphragm failure is critical. Vent limiters are not to be
    used outdoors if they are exposed to the environment.
    13A15 vent protector is available for outdoor use when vent
    protection is required.

    HTH,
    Hearthman

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    16,998
    Quote Originally Posted by hearthman View Post
    From Maxitrol:
    NOTE: Vent limiters are designed for use indoors and in
    spaces where limiting the amount of gas escapement due to
    diaphragm failure is critical. Vent limiters are not to be
    used outdoors if they are exposed to the environment.
    13A15 vent protector is available for outdoor use when vent
    protection is required.

    HTH,
    Hearthman
    Thanks for posting that excerpt. I saw that as well.

    This is out by route 1 and 202. I'm sure there was an appropriate inspection done when these units were piped in. At least, one would hope so.

    All of the other units for this strip mall are pretty much identical to this one.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  11. #24

    help

    been a while since i've been on this site. where do you find the link for the pic??

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